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Monster Details A through C




Monster Details A through C

Contents

Aardvark, Giant

Giant aardvarks resemble their smaller cousins, with a long, pig-like snout, rabbit-like ears, and a kangaroo-like tail. Instead of digging for termites like the normal aardvark, giant aardvarks, which can measure as large as twenty feet in length, tend to dig into cottages and subterranean burrows for large prey such as humans, goblins, and ankhegs. The giant aardvark’s tongue is ten feet long, and is used to suck prey into the aardvark’s mouth.

A successful hit with the tongue forces the target to make a saving throw or be yanked into the aardvark’s mouth and swallowed. The monster can be attacked from within (at an AC of 9 [10]) but only with a short weapon such as a dagger. Anyone inside the aardvark’s stomach takes 1d6 points of damage per round as he is digested. Giant aardvarks don’t eat more than a couple of people before they lose interest. (Author Matt Finch)

  • Giant Aardvark: HD 9; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 tongue (swallows), 2 claws (1d8); Save 6; Move 6; AL N; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Swallow whole.

Source: Monstrosities

Aaztar-Ghola

Aaztar-gholas are ancient creatures originating from some other dimension, foul things that have established themselves in the prime material plane. They are tall, and attire their hideous bodies in flowing, richly embroidered robes, adorning themselves with strange, baroque jewelry. Aaztar-gholas find human flesh delectable, especially when it is cooked with the strange spices with which they flavor their food. An aaztar-ghola lair often contains cauldrons, skewers, and several more alien and disturbing culinary implements.

Aaztar-gholas have a particular necromantic affinity with ghouls, which for some reason obey their commands without any perceptible reluctance. The lair of an aaztar-ghola is likely (90% chance) to be guarded by a pack of 2d6+6 of these undead. In the presence of an aaztar-ghola, ghouls are highly resistant to being turned; treat them as vampires for this purpose. Ghasts are also willing to serve aaztar-gholas, but they do so for their own purposes; they are unaffected by the strange control that aaztar-gholas have over ordinary ghouls. Aaztar-gholas themselves are not undead and thus cannot be turned, although as creatures not inherently native to the prime material plane they are affected by protection from evil.

These horrid creatures are natural adepts of the necromantic arts, and all of them have spellcasting powers. Once per day, an aaztar-ghola can cast the following spells: cause light wounds x2 (at a range of 50ft), fly, detect invisibility, dispel magic, and finger of death. They are capable of speaking with any sort of undead creature, even those such as zombies that have no intellect at all. This ability to communicate with the undead does not imply the ability to control; ghouls are the only undead creatures that automatically follow commands given by an aaztar-ghola. (Author Matt Finch)

  • Aaztar-Ghola: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 swords (1d8); Save 11; Move 12; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Spells, magic resistance 25%

Source: Monstrosities

Aberrant

Aberrants are hideous giants standing about 14 feet tall, with deformed bodies and limbs. Aberrants are covered in coarse, dark hair or blisters (for those without body hair). They make their homes in caves, abandoned mines, or deep underground away from civilization. Many have physical deformities, such as a misplaced or extra arm (an extra attack), eyes on the sides or back of their head (to see people sneaking up on them), flapping ears (to better hear) or a huge nose (to smell creatures).

  • Aberrant: HD 8; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 great club (2d8); Save 8 Move 12; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Physical deformity

Source: Aberrant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Aboleth

The aboleth is a revolting fish-like amphibian, primarily subterranean, roughly the size of a killer whale. It vaguely resembles a catfish, but has four long tentacles and four orifices along its belly. The tentacles can be used to drag its bulk across dry land. These horrid abominations are extremely intelligent: an aboleth can cast charm monster three times per day, and create a phantasmal force three times per day. In the water, an aboleth surrounds itself with a cloud of mucus that requires anyone inhaling it to make a saving throw or become unable to breathe air for 3 hours.Finally, the slime on an aboleth’s tentacles causes disease if a saving throw fails. Those afflicted suffer a change to their skin, which must be immersed in water every hour, or the victim suffers 1d6 points of damage.

  • Aboleth: HD 9; AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 tentacles (1d6 + slime); Save 6; Move 9 (swim 12); AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Charm monster (3/day), Phantasmal force (3/day), Mucus cloud in water (save or cannot breathe air for 3 hours), special disease upon successful hit (save or must be immersed in water every hour).

Source: Monstrosities

Abomination

Abominations (often called hybrids) are fusions of two normal creatures that are just as often intelligent as they are rampaging beasts. No one knows how abominations came to be: perhaps the result of experimentation by a mad wizard or druid, a wish spell gone awry, or the wrath of a deity. The end result that fuses two creatures together often destroys the mind of the hapless beings, forcing them into madness and evil. The most well known examples of abominations are hippogriffs, griffons, gorilla-bears, and the terrible owlbear.

Owlephant

This massive creature looks like an elephant with the head of a giant owl. Beneath its tusks, two clawed arms protrude from its body, one to each side of its elephantine trunk. Its feathered owl head is dark brown, fading to gray as it blends into its elephant-like body. An owlephant can trample opponent simply by moving over them. Those who fail a saving throw suffer 2d8 points of damage each. Those who pass a saving throw leap to the side to avoid the beast. Folk who choose not to avoid the trample attack can make a counter attack at a +1 bonus to hit.

  • Abomination (Owlephant): HD 10; AC 4 [15]; Atk Slam (2d6) and 2 claws (2d8) or gore (2d8); Save 5; Move 12; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Trample

Tigrilla

This creature looks like a gorilla with the head of a tiger. Its arms end in sharpened claws and its fur is orange-brown. Its head is striped like that of a normal tiger.

A tigrilla attacks by raking with its claws and biting with its fangs. If it hits the same opponent with both claws attacks it rakes with the claws, inflicting an additional 1d8 points of damage.

  • Abomination (Tigrilla): HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d8); Save 12 Move 15 (Climb 9); AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Rake with claws

Source: Abomination from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Erica Balsley and Scott Greene.

Abyssal Harvester (Fourth-Category Demon)

This gigantic beast stands nearly 40 feet tall. It is a squat, bloated mass of grayish, leathery flesh, somewhat in an oval shape with six long, serpentine tentacles. A massive gaping maw dominates its top surface. Hundreds of smaller tentacles allow the creature to move. The tentacles, if they hit, constrict for automatic damage after the initial hit. An abyssal harvester – which normally resides in the Abyss – can push up to four tentacles into the world. These tentacles appear out of thin air and can attack and grab victims to “harvest” by dragging them back through the rift to the Abyss.

  • Abyssal Harvester (Fourth-Category Demon): HD 15; AC 1 [18]; Atk 6 tentacles (2d6); Save 3 Move 6; AL C; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Constrict, harvest

Source: Abyssal Harvester (Fourth-Category Demon) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Abyssal Larva

Abyssal larva look like puffy, bloated human-sized whitish-yellow maggots with purplish veins pulsating under their fleshy forms. A vaguely humanoid head sits atop its body and its facial features are twisted and distraught, as if the creature was in a constant state of pain. A pair of large, downward-curving horns juts from its head, just above its sunken eyes. Its mouth is lined with filthy, sharpened fangs. Once per day, an abyssal larva can regurgitate and spray a stream of maggots at a victim within 10 feet. If the creature fails a save, it is sickened.

  • Abyssal Larva: HD 3; AC 8 [11]; Atk acidic bite (2d4); Save 14 Move 6; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: maggot spray

Source: Abyssal Larva from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Adherer

The adherer is a subterranean humanoid whose folds of filthy, pale skin cause it to resemble a mummy. It exudes sticky, sour smelling glue from its skin that sticks to anything other than stone, including melee attacks. Each successful melee attack requires a saving throw to avoid it sticking fast to the weird creature. Once a creature is stuck, it suffers 1d4 damage per round from the grapple. The glue is dissolved by boiling water, and it breaks down 1 hour after the creature dies.

  • Adherer: HD 4; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 slams (1d4); Save 13 Move 12; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Adhesive, double damage from fire, resistance to blunt weapons (50%), surprise on 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Adherer from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Guy Shearer.

Aerial Servant

Aerial servants are semi-intelligent creatures from the Elemental Plane of Air that often roam the Astral and Ethereal planes. They normally are only found on the Material Plane as a result of being summoned by a cleric using the aerial servant spell and commanded to perform some task, often being required to use their immense strength to carry objects or aid the summoner. Though an aerial servant performs whatever task is asked of it, it resents being summoned and forced to do another’s bidding; therefore, it attempts to pervert the conditions of the summoning and its mission. An aerial servant that fails or is thwarted in its mission becomes insane and immediately returns to the caster who summoned it, either killing the caster or carrying the caster back to the Elemental Plane of Air with it. Aerial servants are naturally invisible, and thus remain invisible even while attacking. Aerial servants can only be killed on their native plane. If slain elsewhere, they simply dissolve into wisps of vapor and return to their home plane.

Aerial servants attack by using a shearing blast of wind as a weapon or by grabbing an opponent and crushing it within their powerful grasp. An aerial servant can use its wind blast once every 1d4 rounds. The wind blast has a range of 80 feet and can be used against a single target, inflicting 4d8 points of damage and knocking them back 2d10 feet. The target can roll a saving throw to halve the damage and avoid being knocked back. An aerial servant grapple inflicts 4d4 points of damage each round and is notoriously difficult to break.

  • Aerial Servant: HD 16; AC 3 [16]; Atk Slam (4d4); Save 3 Move 24 (Fly 24); AL N; CL/XP 20/4400; Special: Throttle, invisibility, only harmed by magic weapons, wind blast

Source: Aerial Servant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Afanc

An afanc is a massive, gray-skinned whale with a bulbous head similar to a catfish. Its eyes are sullen and blue and its huge pectoral fins are serrated. These omnivorous hunters roam the deep sea. If an afanc rolls a 15 or above on its bite attack, it grasps a victim in its toothy maw and swallows the creature whole on the next round. When facing surface ships, an afanc can raise its entire body out of the water and crash down on the surface to generate a 30-foot-tall wave to swamp vessels.

  • Afanc: HD 21; AC 2 [17]; Atk Bite (5d6), 2 claws (2d8); Save 3; Move 3 (Swim 30); AL C; CL/XP 23/5300; Special: Swallow whole, sea swell

Source: Afanc from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Ahlinni (Cackle Bird)

The ahlinni, or cackle bird (so called because of its breath weapon) is a 5-foot-tall flightless bird that dwells in thick forests. It is covered in greenish feathers, and is nearly invisible when it lies motionless in its leafy surroundings. The bird’s beak is half the length of its body, and as straight and strong as a long sword (2d8 damage). Wicked claws also sprout from its wings. Once every three rounds, an ahlinni can expel a pinkish gas that causes creatures that fail a save to fall to the ground laughing manically for 1d3 rounds.

  • Ahlinni: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d8) or impale (2d8), 2 claws (1d4); Save 13; Move 15; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Breath weapon, impale

Source: Ahlinni (Cackle Bird) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Erica Balsley.

Air Gust

These minor elementals from the plane of Air resemble little whirlwinds. Although no more than a few feet in height and width, these tiny tornadoes can easily send the bulkiest adventurer flying in a range of up to 15-ft. The victim of a successful hit by an air gust has a 2 in 6 chance of being knocked down (the referee may wish to modify the roll to take into account exceptional strength).

The violent air gusts that make up this elemental’s form (and give it its name) make missile/ranged attacks difficult and afford the elemental a bonus of 2 to AC. (Author: Skathros).

  • Air Gust: HD 3; AC 4 [15]; Atk Wind Blast (1d6+1 + Knockdown – Range up to 15 ft.); Save 14; Move 12 (18 fly); AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: -2 [+2] to AC vs. missile attacks.

Source: Monstrosities

Algoid

The algoid is a living colony of algae that has developed some semblance of intelligence and mobility. It roughly resembles a green humanoid. Algoids make their lairs in marshes and swamps. They are often encountered with other marsh-dwelling sentient plants; though never with shambling mounds (they hate them and usually attack them on sight). In its natural surroundings, it is nearly invisible until it attacks and uses this to its advantage when prey is nearby. Algoids can “wake” trees as do treants. Once per day, an algoid can use a mind blast in a 60-foot cone. Any creature caught in the cone must succeed on a saving throw or be stunned for 3d4 rounds. Control water spells deal 1d6 points of damage per caster level to algoids, with no saving throw allowed.

  • Algoid: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 slams (1d10); Save 12; Move 9; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Immunity to electricity and fire, resistance to blunt weapons (50%), mind blast, surprise on 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Algoid from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Mike Ferguson.

Allip

Allips are shadowy, incorporeal undead that mutter and speak with the voice of madness from beyond the grave. The voice acts as a Suggestion spell upon anyone hearing the quiet mutterings: the suggestions of an allip are usually senseless but sinister. The allip’s touch does not deal damage, but causes the victim to lose 1d4 points of wisdom. If a victim’s wisdom falls to 0, it dies and will become an allip within 2d6 days. Allips can only be hit with magical or silver weapons.

  • Allip: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 strike (no damage, 1d4 points of wisdom lost); Move (fly 6); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: drains wisdom, hypnosis.

Source: Monstrosities

Al-mi’raj

The al-mi’raj is a large rabbit with white, pink, yellow, or light green fur and a long golden or black horn. Al-mi’raj can blink (as the spell) and use a dimension door effect once per round. Rare al’mi’raj are more intelligent than their kin and have the following psionic powers: Control winds, darkness 15-ft. radius, levitate and telekinesis. These psionic al-mi’raj have a challenge level of 3.

  • Al-mi’raj: HD 1d6; AC 5 [14]; Atk Horn (1d6); Save 18; Move 24; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Blink, dimension door, immune to poison, magic resistance 30%

Source: Al-mi’raj from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Roger Musson.

Amphisbaena

The amphisbaena is a giant poisonous snake about 10 feet long. It is often found lairing near a water source or in dark, damp locations. An amphisbaena moves on land by grasping one of its necks with its other head and rolling across the ground like a hoop. The amphisbaena’s poison is deadly unless the victim passes a saving throw. Each of the amphisbaena’s heads functions independently of the other. An amphisbaena that is cut in half continues to function normally (each with half its current hit points) and reattaches its body together in 1d2 days.

  • Amphisbaena: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 bites (1d6 plus poison); Save 11; Move 9 (Climb and Swim 9); AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Resistance to cold (50%), split, cannot be surprised

Source: Amphisbaena from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Amphisbaena Basilisk

An amphisbaena basilisk is a single great lizard composed of two normal basilisks conjoined in the middle. Each head’s gaze can turns to stone anyone meeting its eye. Fighting without trying to look at the creature incurs a -4 penalty to hit. If the amphisbaena basilisk’s gaze is reflected back at it, it has a 10% chance to force the basilisk into a saving throw against being turned to stone itself.

  • Amphisbaena Basilisk: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 bites (2d6); Save 11; Move 12; AL N; CL/XP 10/1,400; Special: Petrifying gaze

Source: Amphisbaena Basilisk from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Amphorons of Yothri

Amphorons of Yothri are mechanisms created by the Artificers of that plane (see, “Artificers of Yothri”) using their strange magic-science. Amphorons on the material plane are physical projections of a model that remains on Yothri – the Artificer’s mind, possibly using a lens apparatus of some kind, projects the device into the material plane, where it has a physical reality.

These projections can fail, and, moreover, the Artificer’s control of more than one Amphoron at a time depends on his mental connection to a single, controlling Amphoron. If the Artificer attempts to switch his mental connection from one Amphoron to another, the process takes 1d6 rounds to complete.

In any given round, any Amphoron has a 1 in 6 chance to “flicker,” due to a momentary interruption of the connection across time and space. While flickering, the Amphoron cannot be attacked, and cannot inflict damage. However, it regains 1 hit point when it rematerializes. A flickering Amphoron is visible as a faint, static-shrouded shape. In the following round, the Amphoron reappears (unless it fails a second roll of the d6).

The controlling Amphoron has only a 1 in 20 chance of flickering, but if it does so, all of the Amphorons under its control will flicker. Any Amphoron can be used as the controller, but a single controller cannot control more than six other Amphorons, and an Artificer can only project his mind to one controller at a time. Thus, unless the Artificer has projected some apparatus (the possibilities are many, and left to the Referee’s creativity) to allow remote controllers or auto-controls, the maximum number of Amphorons encountered at time is seven (six controlled and one controller). When the Artificer’s nefarious schemes on the material plane are complete, he will likely not bother to disintegrate his Amphorons, so their material substance will remain on the material plane, operating randomly, remaining completely inert, or proceeding independently with their rudimentary intelligence.

All Amphorons have a metallic, jointed shell; their insides are filled with wires and a gel-like flesh which allows the mental connection with the distant reality of Yothri, and also gives the creature its basic intelligence. There are three varieties of Amphoron, although the Referee could design others with little effort. (Author Matt Finch; first appeared in Knockspell Magazine #1).

Worker Amphoron

Worker Amphorons are just smaller than a human, and move with crab-like legs (although they can levitate for up to 3 rounds once per day, if need be). As with other Amphorons, they have a 1 in 6 chance of flickering unless used as a controller by the Artificer. In addition to the chance of flickering, a worker Amphoron may randomly belch out arcs of electricity, inflicting 1hp damage to anyone within 10ft (in addition to its other actions).

  • Amphoron (Worker): HD 2; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 pincer-arms (1d6); Save 16; Move 9; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: magic resistance 25%, immune to piercing weapons, chance of flickering, chance of electrical belch.

Warrior Amphoron

Warrior Amphorons are usually used to protect Worker Amphorons, or in situations where the Artificer’s schemes involve violence. They have a flamethrower which is in constant operation, allowing the Amphoron to shoot a line of flame at a single target up to 100ft away in addition to its other attacks. The flame inflicts 1d6 damage (saving throw for half damage).

  • Amphoron (Warrior): HD 5; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 pincer arms (1d6+2); Save 12; Move 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: magic resistance 25%, immune to piercing weapons, chance of flickering, flamethrower.

Juggernaut Amphoron

The Juggernaut Amphoron is a harvester/processor the size of a semi-attached trailer truck, with a moving crane mounted on its back and two huge circular saws mounted on its articulated arms. If the Juggernaut’s crane hits an opponent, the victim is lifted up into the air over the Juggernaut’s processing hatch, and dropped automatically in the following round. If the crane hits, a saving throw is permitted to escape the its grasp unless the target is wearing metal armor, in which case no saving throw is allowed (the crane contains a backup magnet). Anyone dropped into the processing hatch is processed within 1d4 rounds into a small brick.

  • Amphoron (Juggernaut): HD 10; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 whirling blades (2d6+2) or crane; Save 5; Move 9; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: magic resistance 25%, crane, chance of flickering.

Source: Monstrosities

Anemone, Great (Giant) Sea

This gigantic flowerlike creature has a dark green to gray trunk and a brightly colored interior. At the center of the creature’s front is a circular opening that leads into its interior. An anemone attacks any creature that swims into its many tendrils with a paralytic poison that immobilizes prey so it can be swallowed whole. A victim caught in the tendrils can save to resist the paralysis. If a creature fails, the anemone swallows the prey whole in the next round. If provoked, an anemone ejects the contents of its stomach in an acidic cloud that deals 1d8 damage to all creatures within 20 feet for 1d3 rounds.

  • Anemone, Great (Giant) Sea: HD 11; AC 8 [11]; Atk tendrils (paralysis); Save 4; Move 0 (immobile); AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Acid cloud, swallow whole

Source: Anemone, Great (Giant) Sea from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Angels

Angels are a race of celestials native to the lawfully-aligned outer planes.

Angel, Chalkydri

This angelic figure resembles a muscular humanoid with coppery skin and eyes. It has four large feathery, white wings and carries a longsword swathed in fire. Chalkydri take their role as protectors of good very seriously, and shift planes with ease, jumping from one reality to the next to do so. They are powerful spell casters (at will—bless, detect evil, dispel magic, invisibility (self only), polymorph self, remove curse, cure disease, see invisible; 3/day—cure serious wounds, flame strike; 1/day—restoration, raise dead)

  • Angel, Chalkydri: HD 9; AC 0 [19]; Atk +2 flaming long sword (1d8+2 + 1d6 fire); Save 7; Move 9 (Fly 18); AL L; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Plane shift, spells

Angel, Chalkydri from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Angel, Empyreal

Empyreals are powerful angelic warriors about 9 feet tall with silver hair, blue eyes and dressed in shining armor. They have large, feathery, silver wings and milk-white skin. Empyreals are fiery, quick-tempered, and forceful, but always fair. To non-Lawful beings and Lawful creatures with fewer HD, the empyreal appears as a column of white fire. Once per day, an empyreal can increase its radiance to deal 8d6 damage to creatures within 60 feet, and blind them for 3d6 minutes (save for half damage, avoid blindness). An empyreal also radiates an aura in a 30-foot-radius that forces Chaotic creatures to save before they can attack the angel. This aura grants Lawful creatures a -2[+2] armor bonus.

Empyreals have a number of spell-like abilities: at will—continual light, detect evil, dispel magic, invisibility (self only), remove curse; 2/day—blade barrier, cure disease, cure serious wounds; 1/day—resurrection, raise dead. Many can also cast spells as an 8th-level Cleric

  • Angel, Empyreal: HD 12; AC -1 [20]; Atk 1 weapon (2d6); Save 3; Move 15 (Fly 25); AL L; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Radiant blast; immune to acid, cold and petrification; resists electricity and fire; spell-like abilities

Source: Angel, Empyreal from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Angel, Monadic Deva

Monadic devas are angels with silvery wings that patrol the Ethereal and Elemental planes. They serve as leaders and officers in celestial armies. Monadic devas wield two maces +3/+5 vs. constructed creatures. They are immune to acid and cold damage and death effects and suffer only half damage from electricity and fire. Monadic devas can use the following spells: charm elemental (per charm monster, but only affects elementals), continual light, cure disease, cure light wounds (7/day), detect evil, dispel magic, hold monster (1/day), holy word, invisibility (self only), mirror image (7/day), polymorph self and remove curse.

  • Angel, Monadic Deva: HD 10; AC -2 [21]; Atk 2 weapons (3d6); Save 5; Move 18 (Fly 36); AL L; CL/XP 18/3500; Special: Immunities, +1 weapon to hit, magic resistance (60%), magical abilities

Source: Angel, Monadic Deva from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Angel, Movanic Deva

Movanic devas resemble broad-shouldered humans with silver hair, white eyes, and large feathery silver wings. Relatives of the monadic devas, they are usually found wandering the Positive or Negative Energy Planes or the Material Plane. Movanic devas directly aid powerful mortals when evil threatens the balance of the planes. In the celestial armies, movanic devas serve as soldiers.

Movanic devas wield +1 flaming greatswords. Animals do not willingly attack movanic devas, and plant creatures cannot and do not attack them unless attacked first. Movanic devas can shift between planes at will. They can also use the following spells: Anti-magic shell (3/day), continual light, cure disease, cure light wounds (7/day), detect evil, dispel magic, invisibility (self only), plane shift, polymorph self, protection from normal missiles (1/day) and remove curse.

  • Angel, Movanic Deva: HD 8; AC -1 [20]; Atk weapon (3d6); Save 8; Move 18 (Fly 36); AL L; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Immunities, +1 weapon to hit, magic resistance (55%), magical abilities

Source: Angel, Movanic Deva from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Animal Lords

For every animal species, there is a single ruler or lord, looked upon by those animals as a minor deity of sorts. The animal lord is the master of that species; for example, there is a fox lord, mouse lord, and a cat lord. Each animal can assume two forms: human and animal. Its animal form is always of a member of the species it represents. Animal lords are seen as protectors of nature and animals. They may step in and prevent hunters from destroying a race of animals or foresters from completely decimating a forest. They do not, however, interfere with nature itself (i.e., animals die, they are killed for food or clothing)—such is the way of the universe.

Cat Lord

There is only one. The Cat Lord is the Lord of All Felines. His natural form is that of a black panther with dark, ruby eyes. He can assume a human form, and in this form, he appears as a dark-skinned human with black hair, chiseled features, and ruby eyes. In human form, he almost always dresses in black. The Cat Lord spends his days roaming the planes. The Cat Lord can speak the secret language of druids.

When the Cat Lord howls, all creatures except felines within a 20-foot spread must succeed on a saving throw or be stunned for 1d2 rounds. Once every 1d4 rounds the Cat Lord can spit a line of caustic saliva at a single target to a range of 30 feet. A creature hit must succeed on a saving throw or be blinded.

Twice per day, the Cat Lord can automatically summon 1d4+2 lions or tigers, 1d4+4 leopards or cheetahs, 1d2 smilodons, 1d2 weretigers, or 30 + 1d20 (normal) cats. No felines, including chimeras, caterwauls, sea cats, kamadans, tabaxis or feline lycanthropes willingly attack the Cat Lord. The Cat Lord can speak to all such creatures.

Nine times per day, the Cat Lord can lick his wounds, curing 2d4 points of damage. The Cat Lord can use the following spells: Astral spell (1/day), detect evil, dimension door, ethereality (2/day, as the potion), haste (2/day, self only), invisibility and teleport (1/day).

The Cat Lord sees five times as well as a human in shadowy illumination and normal light and can leap up to 30 feet forward, backward or laterally with minimal effort. The Cat Lord can communicate telepathically at a range of 100 feet.

  • Cat Lord: HD 19; AC -5 [24]; Atk 2 claws (2d6) and bite (1d6); Save 3; Move 24 (Climb 12); AL N; CL/XP 26/6200; Special: Change shape, howl, lick wounds, magic resistance (95%), magical abilities, immune to mind-affecting effects, surprise on 1-4 on 1d6, +1 or better weapon to hit

Source: Cat Lord from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Mouse Lord

Special: Change shape, disease, magic resistance (95%), magical abilities, immune to mind-affecting effects (including illusions), surprise on 1-5 on 1d6, +1 or better weapon to hit

Like the Cat Lord, there is only one Mouse Lord, and she is the Lord (or Lady) of all rodents. Her natural form is that of a large black-furred dire rat with copper eyes. She can assume a human form and this form is almost always of a female with darkened skin, raven-black hair, and copper eyes. She dresses in robes of flowing silver or gray. The Mouse Lord spends her days roaming the planes. She can speak the secret language of druids.

The Mouse Lord’s bite causes black fever, which kills in 1d3 days unless cured.

Twice per day, the Mouse Lord can automatically summon 10-100 rats or mice, 2d8 brain rats* or shadow rats*, 2d6 dire rats or barics*, or 1d4 dire shadow rats*, ethereal rats*, or wererats, or 1d4+1 rat swarms. The Mouse Lord can speak to all of these creatures, and none of these creatures will willingly attack the Mouse Lord, although they can be compelled to do so using magic.

The Mouse Lord sees four times as well as a human in shadowy illumination and twice as well in normal light.

The Mouse Lord can use the following spells: Astral spell (1/day), confusion, detect evil, ethereality (2/day, as the potion), teleport (1/day).

* These creatures may be found in this book.

  • Mouse Lord: HD 15; AC -5 [24]; Atk Bite (2d6 + disease); Save 3; Move 24 (Climb 12); AL N; CL/XP 21/4700; Special: Change shape, disease, magic resistance (95%), magical abilities, immune to mind-affecting effects (including illusions), surprise on 1-5 on 1d6, +1 or better weapon to hit

Source: Mouse Lord from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Erica Balsley.

Animated Objects

Animated objects generally do not have minds of their own, being animated by a spell rather than by a spirit of some kind.They may follow programmed instructions, or might follow the orders of a master if the master is actually present. Since there are so many possible types of objects, and so many different ways in which an object might be animated, the exact details of the object are left to the Referee. Two examples are provided, although even with animated chairs and tables the exact details can (and should) occasionally differ.

Animated Carpet

This version of an animated carpet attacks for no damage, but if the target is hit and fails a saving throw, the carpet holds the character, struggling, until a saving throw is successful.

  • Animated Carpet: HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 (no damage); Move 6; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Grab.

Animated Chair

This version of an animated chair bumps against its opponents, with a successful hit causing the target to fall to the ground and take 1hp damage.

  • Animated Chair: HD 1; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bump (save or fall); Move 12; Save 18; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Knocks over.

Source: Monstrosities

Ankheg

Ankhegs are huge insects, 10 to 20ft long, resembling grasshoppers with vicious mandibles. They burrow through the ground, often in farmlands as well as in caverns. Once per day, an ankheg can squirt digestive acids for 5d6 points of damage (save for half), but this is a defense not used in normal hunting.

  • Ankheg 3 HD: HD 3; AC 2 [17] underside 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (3d6); Move 12 (burrow 6); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120XP; Special: Spits acid 5d6 (1/day, save for half)
  • Ankheg 4 HD: HD 4; AC 2 [17] underside 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (3d6); Move 12 (burrow 6); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240XP; Special: Spits acid 5d6 (1/day, save for half)
  • Ankheg 5 HD: HD 5; AC 2 [17] underside 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (3d6); Move 12 (burrow 6); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400XP; Special: Spits acid 5d6 (1/day, save for half)
  • Ankheg 6 HD: HD 6; AC 2 [17] underside 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (3d6); Move 12 (burrow 6); Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 7/600XP; Special: Spits acid 5d6 (1/day, save for half)
  • Ankheg 7 HD: HD 7; AC 2 [17] underside 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (3d6); Move 12 (burrow 6); Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800XP; Special: Spits acid 5d6 (1/day, save for half)
  • Ankheg 8 HD: HD 8; AC 2 [17] underside 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (3d6); Move 12 (burrow 6); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100XP; Special: Spits acid 5d6 (1/day, save for half).

Source: Monstrosities

Ant, Giant

Giant ants live in vast subterranean hives tunneled through soil and even stone. A hive can hold as many as 100 ants, in a worker-to-warrior ratio of 5:1. The poison of a warrior ant does 2d6 points of damage if a saving throw is failed, 1d4 points of damage if the saving throw succeeds.

Ant, Giant (Worker)

Giant Ant (Worker): HD: 2; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d6); Save 16; Move 18; AL N; CL/XP 2/30

Ant, Giant (Warrior)

The poison of a warrior ant does 2d6 points of damage if a saving throw is failed, 1d4 points of damage if the saving throw succeeds.

Giant Ant (Warrior): HD: 3; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d6 + poison); Save 14; Move 18; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Poison 2d6 (save for 1d4 only).

Ant, Giant (Queen)

The queen of a giant ant colony is larger, tougher, and slower than the average giant ant.

Giant Ant (Queen): HD: 10; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d6); Save 5; Special None; Move 3; AL N; CL/XP 8/800

Source: Monstrosities

Ant Lion

The ant lion is a vicious insect-like creature that resembles a giant gray or brown ant with leathery skin covered in coarse, black bristles. Its deep, inset eyes are black and its mouth is filled with rows of jagged teeth. Two large silver mandibles protrude just above its mouth. Each mandible has a barb on its inside midway between the creature’s mouth and the end point of the mandible. The ant lion lurks in the bottom of pits and holes feeding on those unfortunates that fall in.

Ant lions dig deep, funnel-shaped pits in which to trap their prey. An ant lion pit is about 60 feet across and about 20 feet deep. A creature that steps on the pit must succeed at saving throw or slip and fall down into the center of the funnel. It is there the ant lion waits, buried just under the surface of the ground. When prey falls to the center of the funnel, the ant lion surfaces and attacks, using its mandibles to grab and tear its prey. An ant lion that gets a hold does not release its prey until either it or the prey is dead.

  • Ant Lion: HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk Bite (2d8); Save 8; Move 12 (Burrow 6); AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Trap

Ant Lion from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Ape, Flying

Flying apes are somewhat larger and more muscular than gorillas. Most have bat wings, but some have feathered bird-wings. If a flying ape hits with both arms, it can either rend its foe for an additional 1d6 points of damage or gain a good enough hold to carry the foe into the air (to drop later, or deliver the victim to an evil overlord, as applicable). As with gorillas, most flying apes are of far less than human intelligence, but more intelligent (and often chaotic) ones are not uncommon.

  • Flying Ape: HD 5; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 hands (1d4), 1 bite (1d6); Move 9 (fly 18); Save 12; AL N (or C) CL/XP 6/400; Special: Rend or carry airborne.

Source: Monstrosities

Ape, Gorilla

If a gorilla hits with both arms, it will crush and rend the victim for an additional 1d6 points of damage. Some gorillas, especially those living near places of eerie magic, might become carnivorous and seek out human prey with abnormal cunning and rudimentary intelligence. Such carnivorous apes would be of chaotic alignment.

  • Gorilla: HD 4; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 hands (1d3), 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 13; CL/XP 4/120; AL N; Special: Hug and rend.

Source: Monstrosities

Apparition

Apparitions are undead spirits of creatures that died as the result of an accident. The twist of fate that ended their life prematurely has driven them totally and completely to the side of evil. An apparition is often mistaken for a ghost or spectre. Apparitions hate all living creatures and attack them on sight. Apparitions are ethereal creatures and they exist mainly on the Ethereal Plane.

An apparition has no physical attacks and attacks by fear alone. By implanting a suggestion in a victim’s mind, it attempts to actually scare the life out of its opponent. Once the apparition selects a target, it shifts into the Material Plane and uses its spectral strangulation ability. If the target fails a saving throw made to disbelieve in the attack, it dies of fright. If the target succeeds at the saving throw, they are merely affected by the fear spell. Any humanoid slain by an apparition becomes an apparition in 1d4 hours. Apparitions are utterly powerless in natural sunlight and flee from it. An apparition caught in sunlight cannot attack.

  • Apparition: HD 8; AC 4 [15]; Atk Spectral strangulation (see text); Save 8; Move 12 (Fly 24); AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Strangulation, detect living, incorporeal, sunlight powerlessness

Source: Apparition from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Underworld Oracle.

Aqueous Orb

Aqueous orbs are bubble creatures that levitate above the surface of the water, leaving a long, tube-like feeding tail dangling into the water below. Liquid and nutrients are pulled up through the tail to the bubble-like body, which thrives on rotting carrion in the surrounding water. An aqueous orb glows with green luminescence when attacking: those who fail a saving throw will walk toward the orb, enter the water, and most likely drown. The feeding-tail can also be used as a weapon, piercing foes for 1d4 hit points of damage and inflicting 1d4 points of damage automatically thereafter, as it sucks blood from the victim. An aqueous orb is immune to all but piercing weapons; the feeding-tail is immune to all but slashing weapons. (Author: Matt Finch).

  • Aqueous Orb: HD 3; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 feeding-tail (1d4); Save 15; Move 3; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Sucks blood, luminescence, immune to weapon types.

Source: Monstrosities

Arach

This six-armed humanoid has a lithe build and stands just under seven feet tall. They have narrow aquiline faces and bony plates protruding from their thoraxes and limbs. Arach inject a poison with their bite, and may coat their weapons with the same substance. About 30% of arach are spell casters, able to cast spells as a 6th-level Magic-user.

  • Arach: HD 8; AC 5 [14]; Atk 6 slams (1d6) or 6 short swords (1d6), 1 bite (1d4 plus poison); Save 8; Move 12 (Climb 6); AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special:Poison, summon spiders, spells

Source: Arach from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Aranea

An aranea is an intelligent, shapechanging spider with sorcerous powers. In its natural form, an aranea resembles a big spider, with a humpbacked body a little bigger than a human torso. It has fanged mandibles like a normal spider. Two small arms, each about 2 feet long, lie below the mandibles. Each arm has a hand with four many-jointed fingers and a double-jointed thumb. An aranea weighs about 150 pounds. A hump on its back houses its brain.

Aranea can cast webs at a single opponent at a range up to 40ft (saving throw). The victim is entangled, but can break free within 1d6 rounds. These horrid creatures are spellcasters, able to cast one second level and two first level magic-user spells. Usually, an aranea is prepared with 2 charm person spells and a mirror image spell; or, alternatively, with 1 charm person, 1 sleep spell, and invisibility.

  • Aranea: HD 4; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d6 + poison); Move 12; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Webs, Spells.

Source: Monstrosities

Arcanix

Arcanixes (also known as Spell-Stealers), resemble tall, gaunt humans with bluish skin and pointed ears. They are extraplanar creatures that foray into the mortal realms in their obsessive search for magic. They prize magical items above all else, but spellbooks and arcane lore (as well as spellcasters themselves) are also sought to take back to their home plane.

There are three types of Arcanix: Arcanix Minor (3HD), Arcanix Major (6HD) and Arcanix Greater (12HD). If an arcanix is encountered bearing a weapon, it is a near certainty that the weapon is magical in nature (the referee should base the weapon in accordance with the type of arcanix).

An arcanix that can successfully touch a spell-caster may steal spell levels up to its own number of hit dice. Example: An Arcanix Minor (3HD) may steal a third level spell from a magic-user, or three 1st level spells, or a 2nd and a 1st level spell. The spell-caster is allowed a saving throw to negate this effect. If the attack is successful (and the save fails) the stolen spells leave the magic-user’s memory (until he can re-memorize them again), and the arcanix may use them as if he had memorized them. The number of times per day that an Arcanix may use this ability depends on the type of Arcanix; Minor 1/day, Major 3/day, Greater 6/day.

Arcanixes possess the following spell-like Abilities: Detect Magic 3/day, Read Magic 3/day, Dispel Magic 2/day, Dimension Door 1/day. An arcanix may teleport to or from its home plane once (3HD), twice (6HD), or 3 times (12HD) per week.

(Contributed by Skathros).

  • Arcanix (Minor): HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon, or special ability, or spell; Save 14; Move 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Spells, Spell-Stealing, Teleport.
  • Arcanix (Major): HD 6; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon, or special ability, or spell; Save 11; Move 12; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Spells, Spell-Stealing, Teleport.
  • Arcanix (Greater): HD 12; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon, or special ability, or spell; Save 3; Move 12; AL N; CL/XP 14/2600; Special: Spells, Spell-Stealing, Teleport.

Source: Monstrosities

Arcanoplasm

Arcanoplasms resemble giant pale yellow amoebas with “veins” of dark gray striping. Arcanoplasms are “tuned” to arcane magic and can detect magic-users within 100 feet. They can mimic any 5th-level or lower magic-user spell cast within 30 feet on their next action. Any arcane spell cast is automatically absorbed to heal 1 point for every 3 points of damage otherwise done (non-damaging spells heal 1 point per spell level of the spell). Spells that affect an area are not absorbed, but also don’t affect the arcanoplasm. Cleric spells affect the ooze normally. Arcanoplasms are immune to poison, sleep effects, paralysis and polymorph.

  • Arcanoplasm: HD 5; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 acid slam (2d4 plus 1d6 acid + grab); Save 12; Move 3; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: acid (1d6), absorb spells, spell mimicry, immunities

Source: Arcanoplasm from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Archer Bush

The archer bush is a subterranean, semi-mobile plant that looks like a small mound of brownish-green leaves with pale buds of gold and purple. It takes sustenance from the blood of living creatures. Hidden beneath its trunk is the archer bush’s mouth, which appears to be nothing more than a dark recess or cavity. It attacks by firing a cluster of thorns at a single creature that comes within 20 feet of its location. These thorns inflict 1d8 points of damage and impose a -1 penalty to hit and to saving throws until removed.

  • Archer Bush: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk Thorns (1d8); Save 16; Move 3; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Thorns

Source: Archer Bush from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Jean Wells.

Archer-Tree

Archer-trees are a species of walking pine tree. Some of the tree’s needles are extremely long, although this is not easy to notice from afar. The tree’s animated branches can throw 1d4 of these longer needles per round to a range of 100ft. The needles contain a sedative poison that paralyzes victims for 3d6 turns (saving throw negates).

  • Archer-Tree: HD 7; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1d4 needles (1d6 + paralyze); Move 1; Save 9; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Paralysis.

Source: Monstrosities

Artificer of Yothri

The artificers of Yothri are tall and skeletal, a construction of dark-hued metalloid bones acting as the framework for artificial tubes and organs. They wear hoods and long, black robes – perhaps a necessity of the dead world they inhabit in a distant and eroding reality. Their palaces are of baroque green glass and alien metals, twisting in unnatural shapes, domes, and bubbles. The artificers are mutually hostile, each coveting the others’ resources and knowledge. It is remotely possible that player characters might be kidnapped to serve an artificer by attacking the citadel of one of the others in the barren, suppurating wastelands of Yothri itself.

An artificer employs the Science of Yothri, which is a mix of psychic powers, magic, and technology impossible to achieve outside the physical realities of Yothri itself. Rather than manifesting in spells, the Science of Yothri allows the Artificer to use certain powers, some mental, some magical, as follows:

Psychic powers: at will, (in conjunction with a physical attack if desired), the artificer can use telekinesis to lift up to 300 pounds of weight, create or maintain a “double vision” effect similar to a single mirror image per the spell, increase magic resistance to 80%, maintain a mental connection with an amphoron in another plane, or work to establish a connection with an amphoron in another plane (the mental connection with amphorons is described below).

Magical powers: in conjunction with a psychic power (but not with physical attacks), the Artificer may create one of the following effects using the Science of Yothri: (1) once per day, the Artificer can cast charm person in a cone shape 60ft long and reaching 60ft wide at extreme range, (2) three times per day, the Artificer can cast a spell to cause metal poisoning in the target’s bloodstream (a saving throw applies), rendering the victim helpless with pain and causing death within 2d6 rounds unless the poison is counteracted. (Author: Matt Finch; first appeared in Knockspell Magazine #1)

  • Artificer of Yothri: HD 10; AC 2 [17]; Atk claw (1d10+1); Save 5; Move 15; AL C; CL/XP 14/2600; Special: Magic Resistance 50% (80%), psychic powers, magic powers.

Source: Monstrosities

Ascomoid

Ascomoids are subterranean fungus monsters that exist on a diet of living creatures. They appear as 10-ft. diameter brownish-green puffballs pocked by small dots that function as sensory organs. Ascomoids feed by sitting atop a slain creature and absorbing its body fluids into its own form. Creatures slain in this manner appear as rotting husks. Ascomoids generally avoid light and the surface world, though they have no adverse reaction to sunlight or bright light. They attack by rolling over its opponents or slamming into them. Creatures that are run over or slammed must pass a saving throw or be knocked prone. Ascomoids can also fire spores at attackers. The spores have a range of 30-ft. and billow into a cloud with a 20-ft. radius and 20-ft. height. Creatures caught in the cloud must pass a saving throw or suffer 2d6 points of damage. All creatures, whether they save or not, are blinded and nauseated for 1d4 rounds.

  • Ascomoid: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk Run over or slam (1d8); Save 11; Move 15; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Run over, spores, resistance to blunt weapons, fire and electricity (50%)

Source: Arscomoid from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Asrai

An asrai is a 1-foot tall female fey with long golden hair, slightly pointed elf-like ears and pale blue skin. Her eyes are emerald or gold and her features are delicate. Male asrai are thought to exist, though none have ever been encountered. Asrai can’t leave their watery homes for more than an hour. An asrai’s touch chills opponents for 1d6 points of damage. Asrai cast spells as 5th-level Magic-Users. Twice per day, they can also cast create water and obscuring mist.

  • Asrai: HD 1; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 cold touch (1d6); Save 17; Move 12 (Swim 24); AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Chill touch, spells, water dependent

Source: Asrai from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Assassin Bug, Giant

A giant assassin bug has a narrow head ending in a segmented beak or proboscis. The 5-foot-tall creature’s carapace is dull brownish-black and its front jackknife legs are covered in thousands of small hairs. Two long segmented antennae jut from its head. Assassin bugs are predatory insects that feed on the blood and tissue of living creatures. An assassin bug has two pairs of wings that it keeps folded against its back when not using them to fly. The bite of an assassin bug injects a corrosive poison that liquefies its prey’s insides (save to resist).

  • Asrai: HD 6; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d6) and 1 bite (1d8 + liquefy organ); Save 11; Move 9 (Climb 6, Fly 12); AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Liquefy organs

Source: Asrai from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Assassin Vine

The assassin vine is a semi-mobile plant that collects its own grisly fertilizer by grabbing and crushing animals and depositing the carcasses near its roots. A mature plant consists of a main vine, about 20 feet long. Smaller vines, up to 5 feet long, branch off from the main vine about every 6 inches.

An assassin vine can move about, albeit very slowly, but usually stays put unless it needs to seek prey in a new vicinity.

An assassin vine growing underground usually generates enough offal to support a thriving colony of mushrooms and other fungi, which spring up around the plant and help conceal it.

An assassin vine can animate plants in the near vicinity (about 30ft), and these plants will immobilize anyone failing a saving throw.

  • Assassin Vine: HD 7; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 vine (1d6+1); Move 1; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Animate plants.

Source: Monstrosities

Astral Moth

Astral moths are large, moth-like creatures with the bizarre ability to carry other creatures between planes of existence, or into other dimensions. The origins of these rare creatures are lost in the sands of time, but three varieties are now known. The dark and the white varieties are both semi-intelligent, the dark-colored moths being Chaotic in alignment and the white ones being aligned with Law. There is also a grey variety which is apparently closer to the original breeding stock, having only animal intelligence and a Neutral alignment. All three varieties are capable of planar travel, taking their instructions by means of a rudimentary mental telepathy. Poorly trained and untrained astral moths may attempt to throw off a rider mid-journey, which is a significant hazard.

Once an astral moth is airborne, it can begin flying into the spaces between realities on the way to other planes of existence or other dimensions. The time required for such travel will vary in accordance with the intended destination.

The creatures themselves are relatively harmless; the threat of an astral moth is whatever strange being might be riding it as a mount. Astral moths have been used by many ancient, non-human civilizations existing in different times, planes, or dimensions. They are, of course, greatly prized by wizards, and the egg of an astral moth is worth 5,000 gp if sold. Capturing a wild adult is possible, but care must be taken in order to keep it from getting airborne: if the creature is able to take wing, it will escape into the unknown dimensions. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Astral Moth: HD 4-2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 3/90 (flying); Save 13; AL (any); CL/XP 5/240; Special: Dimensional Flight.

Source: Monstrosities

Astral Shark

Astral sharks are sleek, piscean creatures with blotchy skin of sickly white and pink. They measure between 12 and 30 feet in length. Astral sharks have jagged, slightly curved dorsal fins and large, bulbous, lidless eyes that show no trace of pity. Astral sharks dwell on the Astral Plane, sitting atop that weird dimension’s food chain. They seem to be drawn to the strange energies of visitors to the Astral Plane, relishing the silver cords that connect an astral traveler to its material body. Astral sharks can detect the presence of an astral traveler within 180 feet. When such a traveler is detected, it streaks toward them and begins to circle, darting in to bite with its powerful jaws. On a roll of a natural 20, the astral shark manages to sever the traveler’s astral cord, destroying its material body and astral form.

  • Astral Shark: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d8); Save 8; Move 24; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Astral scent, sever silver cord

Source: Astral Shark from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Athatch

The offspring of a demon and a giant, an athatch is a monster about 14ft tall, weighing about 2 tons, with 1d3 eyes, 1d3 arms, and 1d3 legs. An odd-numbered eye is located in its forehead, an odd-numbered arm is located in the middle of its chest, and an odd-numbered leg is located behind its haunch. It is ambidextrous (if it has two or more arms) and can wield a weapon in any or all of its hands. They use massive weapons, usually great clubs (2d6 damage). An athatch cannot normally bite opponents man-sized or smaller in melee, but may (if victory seems likely) toy with its victims by grasping and lifting an opponent with a free hand (a to-hit roll is still required) and then biting on the following round. The poisonous spit of the athatch requires a saving throw at -2 or the victim becomes helplessly nauseated for 1d3 turns; the athatch also can spit this poison up to 10ft.

Because of their demonic heritage, athatch have 60-ft. darkvision and the following spell-like abilities they can use once per hour: darkness (5-ft. radius), levitate, and phantasmal force. Once per day an athatch can polymorph self into the form of another giant. They subtract 1 point of damage per die from cold, fire, gas, and lightning attacks against them. (Author: Scott Casper).

  • Athatch: HD 11; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 or 2 weapons (3d6 or 2d6/2d6)/1 bite (1d6+1); Move 15; Save 4; AL C; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Poison (nausea) spit, darkness, levitate, phantasmal force, reduced damage from cold, fire, gas, electricity, polymorph into other giant type.

Source: Monstrosities

Atomie

Atomies are among the smallest of the fey, looking like 1-foot tall elves with gangly limbs and greenish skin. They dwell in arboreal regions, with a single atomie family staking their claim to a single tree. Atomies are attractive, especially when compared to other sprites. Atomie clothing is almost always magical, made to change color with the seasons to help hide the wearer during all times of the year. Atomies can cast the following spells: Blink, entangle, invisibility (self), pass without trace and speak with animals.

  • Atomie: HD 1d3; AC 4 [15]; Atk Weapon (1d3); Save 18; Move 15 (Fly 24); AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special:Spells, magic resistance (20%), surprise on 1-2 on 1d6

Source: Atomie from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Aurumvorax (Golden Gorger)

The aurumvorax (also called the golden gorger) is an extremely vicious creature that resembles an 8-legged badger with bright, golden fur. Only 3 feet long, aurumvoraces are extremely territorial, coming together only rarely to mate. The aurumvorax attacks by biting a foe and holding on with its powerful jaws. Victims of the creature’s bite attack must pass a saving throw to avoid being held in jaws and raked with four claw attacks, each inflicting 1d4 points of damage. Aurumvorax feed on gold, devouring the coins and using the gold to strengthen their bones and stiffen their bristles. The pelt and bones of the animal are worth 2,000 gp.

  • Aurumvorax: HD 12; AC 0 [19]; Atk Bite (1d8); Save 3; Move 12 (Burrow 3); AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Rake with claws, surprise on 1-2 on 1d6, resistance to fire (50%), immunity to poison

Source: Aurumvorax from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Azer

Azers are dwarflike beings native to the Elemental Plane of Fire. They wear kilts of brass, bronze, or copper, and bear broad-headed spears or well-crafted hammers in combat. Their attacks deal +1 damage due to their intense heat. They are immune to fire damage. Stats are for the normal azer; sergeants and leaders can be much larger and will have more hit dice.

  • Azer: HD 2; AC 2(17); Atk 1 weapon (1d6+1); Save 16; Move 12; AL L; CL/XP 3/60; Special: +1 heat damage, immune to fire.

Source: Monstrosities

B

Babbler

Babblers are tall creatures that appear to a cross between a lizardman and a gorgosaurus. They have yellow scales, grey underbellies, and large, strong tails that keep them balanced when they stand on their hind legs. Most of their time is spent slithering on their stomach in search of prey. The babbler is a carnivore and is quite fond of human, elven, and dwarven flesh. They speak their own weird, gutteral language and understand Common but cannot speak it. A babbler making a surprise attack enjoys a +2 bonus to hit and damage.

  • Babbler: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6) and bite (1d8); Save 12; Move 15 (Bipedal 9); AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Surprise on 1-4 on 1d6

Source: Babbler from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Jeremy Goodwin and Ian McDowell.

Baboon

Baboons are vicious pack hunters, usually led by a stronger-than-normal alpha male. They might be susceptible to the influence of ancient and evil powers. Giant baboons stand 8ft tall on two legs, about twice the size of a normal baboon. As with normal baboons, they are susceptible to the influence of ancient and evil powers.

  • Baboon: HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 12; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.
  • Baboon alpha male: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None.
  • Giant Baboon: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 12; Save 14; CL/XP 3/60; AL N; Special: None.
  • Giant Baboon (alpha male): HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d8+1); Move 12; Save 16; CL/XP 5/240; AL N; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Baccae

Baccae are attractive women with long flowing, rich, red hair and emerald green eyes. They wear billowy white robes emblazoned with archaic symbols and runes and stand between 5 and 6 feet tall and weigh around 120 to 130 pounds. When enraged or intoxicated, baccae become beastlike and attack with weapons, fangs and claws. When in human form, any creature withon 30 feet meeting their gaze must save or be charmed (as per the spell).

  • Baccae: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d6) and 1 bite (1d4) or 1 weapon (1d10) and 1 bite (1d6); Save 14; Move 6; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: beast form, charming gaze

Source: Baccae from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Badger, Giant

These subterranean predators are the size of a full-grown human, and quite aggressive when defending their territory. Young Giant Badgers have 1HD.

  • Giant Badger: HD 3; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 Claws (1d3), bite (1d6); Move 6; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Bag of Teeth

A bag of teeth is a deceptive-looking little critter. At first glance, the creature looks like a pouch of coins. Its insides, seen when one opens the “pouch”, resemble coins of gold. As one inserts his hand within the creature to retrieve the gold within, the critter’s razor-sharp teeth spring open around the pouches opening, and clamp down on the victim’s wrist. The bite causes 1d6 points of damage and holds on, with 1d6+1 hp being lost automatically each subsequent round until the vicious creature is killed and lets go. (Author: Skathros).

  • Bag of Teeth: HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk Bite (1d6+1/round); Save 17; Move 0; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Bites and holds.

Source: Monstrosities

Banderlog

The banderlog is a somewhat intelligent baboon-like primate with grayish-brown fur that makes its home in warm forests and jungles. Though it appears as a larger version of the common baboon, it does not keep company with or associate with normal baboons. Banderlogs’ intelligence allows them to form small tribal communities for protection and companionship. The leader of such a community is usually the largest and strongest banderlog of the tribe. Banderlogs sustain themselves on a diet of fruits and nuts, with coconuts being their favorite food. Though omnivorous, they rarely eat meat of any sort. Unaggressive unless threatened, banderlogs prefer to attack from a distance using small rocks or coconuts. They can hurl these projectiles up to 50 feet.

  • Banderlog: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk Bite (1d6) or club (1d6) or coconut (1d4); Save 13; Move 15 (Climb 12); AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Coconut throwing

Source: Banderlog from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Banshee

Banshees are horrid faerie (or undead) creatures that live in swamps and other desolate places. Their shriek (once per day) necessitates a saving throw versus death or the hearer will die in 2d6 rounds. They can travel over water and other terrain as if it were land, but crossing running water causes them to lose their magic resistance for 3d6 hours. They look like gaunt humans (male or female) with long, stringy hair and glowing yellow eyes. They often wear hooded cloaks. At the Referee’s discretion, such creatures might be undead rather than faerie-folk, and are considered Type 9 undead for turning purposes.

  • Banshee: HD 7; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 claw (1d8); Move (fly 12); Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Magic or silver to hit; magic resistance 49%; shriek of death; Immune to enchantments

Source: Monstrosities

Baobhan Sith

A baobhan sith appears as female elf with pearl white skin, golden or brown hair, and eyes of emerald, blue or hazel. Her figure is sleek and curved and she moves with a cat-like grace. By entrancing creatures with their dance, they lure men to their deaths. Those who see her dance must make a save, or become enthralled for 2d4 rounds. Once a target is captivated, the baobhan sith moves in and drains its blood with a bite (1d4 points of damage). When slain, the baobhan sith curses her killers with her dying words. At will, baobhan sith can detect thoughts and cast plant growth and suggestion.

  • Baobhan Sith: HD 2; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 slam (1d4) and 1 bite (1d4); Save 14; Move 15; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Blood drain, captivating dance, dying words, spell-like abilities

Source: Baobhan Sith from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Barbegazi (Ice Gnome)

Barbegazis – also known as ice gnomes – stand about 3-1/2 feet tall and have white hair and long flowing whitish-blue beards that appear to be made of icicles. Their skin is pale and glossy-white and their eyes are deep blue. They have large, flat feet and never wear shoes. They are perfectly adapted to live in the coldest regions, and can walk on deep snow without being slowed. Once per day, a barbegazi can cause metal to freeze using a variation of heat metal. They are also able to shoot shards of ice from their hands (cold variation of burning hands, 1/day) to stop attackers.

  • Barbegazi: HD 2; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 weapon (1d4); Save 16; Move 9; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Spell-like abilities, snow move, immune to cold, fire vulnerability

Source: Barbegazi from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Baric

Barics look like giant 6-legged rats with black fur and yellow eyes. They have long, duck-like bills lined with rows of needle-like teeth. The average baric is 3 feet long and weighs 50 pounds, though they can grow to a length of 7 feet and weigh about 150 pounds. Some races keep barics as pets, though more often than not, these unpredictable monsters turn on their masters within a short time of entering captivity.

  • Baric: HD 2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d3) and bite (1d8); Save 16; Move 15; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None

Source: Baric from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Jean Wells.

Barracuda

Barracudas are fast, predatory fish. They are smaller than most sharks, and hunt in groups. The great barracuda can reach lengths of 6ft, but barracuda that hunt in schools are from 3-4-ft. in length.

  • Barracuda: HD 1; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move (swim 24); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Basidirond

Basidirons are fungal creatures that resemble inverted umbrellas with stems of dark green or brown hanging beneath it. The inside of its cone-shaped top is inky black. The basidirond stands 7 feet tall, and is believed to be related to the ascomoid (q.v.). It makes it lair in very dry underground caverns. The basidirond attacks by striking with its cone-shaped cap or by releasing a cloud of spores . This cloud of spores measures 20 feet in radius. Creatures within the cloud must succeed on a saving throw or be affected as by a confusion spell for as long as they remain in the cloud plus 1d4 rounds after leaving the area. A new save must be made each round a creature remains within the affected area. (For more specific hallucinations see the sidebar text.)

Basidirond Hallucination Cloud

Rather than affecting an opponent as by a confusion spell, you can randomly determine hallucinations for each creature affected. The duration remains the same as detailed under the creature’s special attack.

1d8 Hallucination

1 Individual believes he is in a swamp and strips off gear and armor to avoid sinking.

2 Individual believes he is being attacked by a swarm of spiders. He attacks the floor and surrounding area.

3 Individual believes item held has turned into a viper; drops item and retreats back from it.

4 Suffocation—Individual believes he is suffocating and gasps for air and clutches throat.

5 Individual believes he has shrunk to 1/10 normal size. He begins yelling for help.

6 Individual believes his associates have contracted a disease. He will not come closer than 10 feet.

7 Individual believes he is melting; grasps self in attempt to hold together.

8 Individual believes his back is covered with leeches. He tears armor, clothing, etc. from his back to get at them.

A basidirond’s slam attack transfers smothering, poisonous spores to its opponent. A creature struck must succeed on a saving throw or smother in 1d4+1 rounds unless a cure disease spell is cast on them. A basidirond takes no damage from a cold effect, but is slowed (as the spell). During this time, a basidirond cannot use its poisonous spores or hallucination cloud special attacks.

  • Basidirond: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk Slam (1d8 + spores); Save 12; Move 9; AL N (C tendencies); CL/XP 8/800; Special: Hallucination cloud, spores, immune to cold

Source: Basidirond from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Basilisk

Basilisks are great multi-legged lizards whose gaze turns to stone anyone meeting its eye (one way of resolving this: fighting without looking incurs a –4 penalty to hit). If the basilisk’s own gaze is reflected back at it, it has a 10% chance to force the basilisk into a saving throw against being turned to stone itself.

  • Basilisk: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Petrifaction gaze.

Source: Monstrosities

Basilisk, Desert

Desert basilisks appear to be fat cobra snakes, about 20ft long and 2 ft. in diameter, with four skinny legs that help propel them along the ground and with horns all around the top of the head. These basilisks are extremely poisonous—so much so that even their gaze inflicts 1d6 points of damage unless those meeting its eye make a successful saving throw. Anyone avoiding the basilisk’s gaze attacks with a -4 penalty to hit and damage. In addition, a desert basilisk can spit its poison up to 20ft as a missile attack for 1d12 points of poison damage. The desert basilisk’s bite inflicts 1d4 points of physical damage and the poison inflicts an additional 1d12 points. A saving throw negates the basilisk’s poison, but anyone who purposely comes into physical contact with a basilisk’s hide automatically takes 1d6 points of poison damage. Any weapon that strikes a desert basilisk becomes envenomed and does and additional 1d12 points of poison damage to the next target it hits.

Desert basilisks are solitary monsters, indigenous to desert regions, but are sometimes transported elsewhere by wizards looking for exotic guardians. (Author: Scottenkainen).

  • Desert Basilisk: HD 4+4; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite or 1 spit (1d4+1d12 or 1d12); Move 9; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Poisonous gaze (non-lethal).

Source: Monstrosities

Basilisk, Crimson

A crimson basilisk is about 6 feet long and weighs over 400 pounds. Its skin is dull crimson though it can easily change its color to match that of its surroundings. Its eight legs are thick and stout and end in sharpened claws. The spines on its back are crimson as well, though they tend to be darker than its overall body (especially in males). Its eyes glow with a ghostly blue light. A crimson basilisk’s saliva is corrosive, dealing 1d6 points of acid damage with each bite. Any creature within 30 feet that meet’s the creature’s gaze must save or lose 1d4 hit points as their blood weeps from their eyes, ears, nose and mouth. A crimson basilisk that detects fresh blood within 30 feet enters a frenzied state that gives it a +2 to-hit bonus.

  • Crimson Basilisk: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d8 + acid); Save 11; Move 6; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Acid bite, blood frenzy, wounding gaze, camouflage

Source: Crimson Basilisk from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Basilisk, Greater

Greater basilisks are larger, more vicious cousins of the normal basilisk. They are 12-foot long reptilian monsters with dull brown skin, yellow underbellies and eyes that glow with an eerie, pale green incandescence. Sages believe the greater basilisk hails from the Elemental Plane of Earth.

In combat they rear up on their hind legs and slash opponents with their poisonous claws while also using their deadly gaze attack. The beast’s poisonous claws inflict an additional 1d4 points of damage with each hit unless a successful saving throw is made. The breath of a greater basilisk is so foul that all creatures within 5 feet must succeed on a saving throw or take 1d4 points of damage each round they remain in the area. A creature need only succeed on this saving throw once to avoid further damage from the poisonous breath.

The greater basilisk’s petrifying gaze has a 50-foot range. Those it looks at must succeed at a saving throw or be turned into stone. The greater basilisk is near-sighted and must be within 10 ft. of its reflected gaze to suffer the same fate.

  • Greater Basilisk: HD 10; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (1d8 + poison) and bite (1d8); Save 5; Move 9; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Foul breath, petrifying gaze, poison

Source: Greater Basilisk from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Bat Monster

These creatures attack with claws as well as a bite. They are twice the size of a man, with a tremendous wingspan. Fearful peasants might even mistake them for small dragons when they fly by night

  • Bat Monster: HD 8; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (2d8), 2 claws (1d6); Move 4 (fly 18); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Bat, Doombat

The doombat is a giant black bat with glowing yellow eyes. It is a nocturnal hunter that desires living flesh to sustain it. The doombat has a 10-foot wingspan, though specimens with wingspans reaching 25 feet have been reported. The approach of a doombat can be heard long before the creature arrives on the scene, the yipping growing louder as the doombat draws closer. When a doombat yips, all creatures (except other doombats) within a 100-foot spread must succeed on a saving throw or suffer a -1 penalty on attacks rolls and saving throws for the duration of the battle. The yipping is constant, and spellcasters in the area must succeed on a saving throw anytime they attempt to cast a spell. The effect of several doombats yipping at once is not cumulative. Doombats use echolocation to pinpoint creatures within 120 feet, allowing them to attack invisible opponents at no penalty.

  • Doombat: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk Bite (1d8) and tail (1d6); Save 11; Move 3 (Fly 18); AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Shriek

Source: Doombat from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Julian Lawrence

Bat, Mobat

Mobats are large, brown bats with razor-sharp fangs and green, glowing eyes. The mobat has a wingspan of approximately 15 feet. It is a nocturnal creature, cruising silently through the night sky in its never ending quest for food. A mobat can blast an ear-splitting screech that affects all within a 20-foot spread. The screech stuns any creature in the area for 1d3 rounds if it fails a saving throw. Mobats use echolocation to pinpoint creatures within 120 feet, allowing them to attack invisible opponents at no penalty.

  • Mobat: HD 4; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d8); Save 13; Move 9 (Fly 15); AL N (C tendencies); CL/XP 6/400; Special: Sonic screech

Source: Mobat from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Bat, Giant (Greater Bat)

Giant bats are massive, man-sized cousins of the bat; they do not suck blood, but their bite is nonetheless deadly. One in ten carries disease.

  • Giant Bat: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d10), 2 claws (1d6); Move 4 (fly 18); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: 10% chance of disease.

Source: Monstrosities

Bat, Giant (Vampire Bat)

These bats suck blood for automatic damage of 1d6 after a successful bite. They are the size of a falcon.

  • Giant Bat (Vampire Bat) HD 1; AC 8 [11]; Atk bite (2d6); Move 4 (Fly 18); Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Sucks blood.

Source: Swords & Wizardry Complete Rulebook

Bears

Bear, Black

Black bears are smaller than grizzly bears and polar bears, and have a very broad size range, from 90 pounds (small females) to about 500 pounds (large males). If a black bear hits with both claws, it hugs for an additional 1d8 hit points of damage.

  • Black Bear: HD 4+1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d6); Move 9; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Hug (1d8).

Bear, Grizzly

Very large brown bears, grizzlies hug for an additional 2d6 points of damage (if hitting with both claw attacks) and can automatically maintain the hold, crushing the victim and continuing attempts to bite as well.

  • Grizzly Bear: HD 6; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), 1 bite (1d10); Move 9; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Hug (2d6).

Bear, Cave or Polar

Prehistoric bears and polar bears are even larger than a grizzly bear. When hitting with both claws, they hug for 3d6 points of damage.

  • Cave or Polar Bear: HD 7; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d6+1), 1 bite (1d10+1); Move 12; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Hug (3d6).

Source: Monstrosities

Beast of Chaos

A chaos beast resembles a lion with dark, blackened fur, razor-sharp fangs, and oversized paws that wield sharpened claws.

When a beast of chaos growls, roars, hisses, or makes any other sound common to its animal type, all creatures within 30 feet that hear it and those with fewer HD than the beast of chaos must succeed on a saving throw or become shaken for 5d6 rounds.

In the presence of bright light, a beast of chaos flies into a berserk rage, attacking until either it or its opponent is dead. It gains a +1 bonus to hit and damage while enraged. If the source of light is removed, the creature’s rage ends 1d4 rounds later.

Beasts of chaos are immune to confusion, fear, hold animal, hold monster, slow, and haste.

  • Beast of Chaos: HD 5; AC 0 [19]; Atk 2 claws (1d4) and bite (1d8); Move 12; Save 15; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Frightful presence, rage, immunities, magic resistance (25%)

Source: Beast of Chaos from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Bedlam

A bedlam is a semi-amorphous, nearly vaporous creature composed of pure chaos. The creature has no set shape or form. Every minute or so its form changes from that of a smoky gray and vaguely humanoid figure with arms, head, and torso to a swirling mass of grayish-black chaotic matter crackling with bluish-gray energy. A bedlam can unleash a burst of energy against nearby opponents for 4d8 damage (save for half). Spells fizzle around a bedlam, with magic-users needing to make a save to successfully cast a spell.

  • Bedlam: HD 8; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 slams (2d4); Move (Fly 30); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Chaos burst, immune to polymorph, spell failure

Source: Bedlam from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Bee, Giant

Giant bees may be found in more than one variety: the giant bee addressed here is the hive-building honeybee. Other varieties include the larger giant bumblebees, which make nests rather than hives. The giant honeybee is essentially the same as normal bees, but they are the size of a football. Giant bees are not killed by stinging an opponent, but the sting only carries enough poison for one injection – if the bee continues to fight rather than fleeing, the sting will only inflict the normal damage caused by the stab itself. The honey produced by giant bees is of superlative quality, and the royal jelly produced to feed larvae has powerful medicinal properties.

  • Giant Bee: HD 3; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 sting (1d3 + poison); Move 3 (flying 24); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Lethal poison sting.

Source: Monstrosities

Beetles (Giant)

Beetle, Giant Arcane

A gargantuan beetle with a carapace of mirror-like silver. Arcane Beetles are ideally suited as mounts for warring against magic-users and other arcane spellcasters due to their innate abilities. Any spell cast upon an Arcane Beetle, be it from spells or from magic items, is immediately reflected back at the wizard. (Author: Skathros).

  • Arcane Beetle: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk pincers (2d6); Save 12; Move 12; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Arcane Reflection.

Source: Monstrosities

Beetle, Giant Blister

Blister beetles are 3 feet long with slick, dark green carapaces. Their legs are dark green or black and their mandibles are serrated, and black or green in color. When they snap them together, their mandibles produce an audible clicking sound that can be heard up to 10 feet away. When attacked, the beetle releases a foul stream of oily liquid up to 20 feet that irritates an attacker’s skin (1d3 damage, save avoids).

  • Giant Blister Beetle: HD 2; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 15; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Blister spray, immune to poison

Source: Giant Blister Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Beetle, Giant Boring

Giant boring beetles are 9-foot long, with greenish-gray carapaces and wing-covers and black legs and mandibles. They feed primarily on wood, mold, fungus, and other organic matter and make their lairs inside ancient tunnels and caverns, where they harvest and grow molds and fungi. Shriekers are prized for both food and their use as alarms to warn the boring beetles of intrusion. Boring beetles are about 9 feet long. All boring beetles within 1 mile of each other are in constant communication. If one is aware of a particular danger, they all are. If one in the group is not surprised then none of them are.

  • Giant Boring Beetle: HD 5; AC 2 [17]; Atk Bite (2d8); Move 9; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Hive mind

Source: Giant Boring Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Beetle, Giant Deathwatch

This creature appears as a giant beetle with a dark green carapace and wing-covers. Its body is covered in leaves and sticks. Its mandibles are silver and its legs are black. The death watch beetle makes its lair in forests and uses a mixture of saliva and earth to stick rubbish (leaves and twigs, for instance) to itself in order to attack by surprise. Once every hour, a death watch beetle can vibrate its carapace to produce a clicking noise that sets up vibrations in all creatures within 30 feet. Affected creatures with 6 HD or less must succeed on a saving throw or die immediately. Creatures with more than 6 HD or those that succeed on their saving throw take 4d6 points of damage. Since the effect stems from the vibrations set up in a victim’s body and not from the clicking noise itself, silence offers no protection against this attack. Likewise, a creature that cannot hear can still be affected.

  • Giant Deathwatch Beetle: HD 9; AC 2 [17]; Atk Bite (1d8); Move 12; Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Death rattle, immune to death spells, surprise on a 1-4 on 1d6

Source: Giant Deathwatch Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Beetle, Giant (Normal)

These stats are for a generic giant beetle about five feet long. Larger or smaller beetles might have different statistics or have unusual abilities; to reflect the vast range of possible sizes, assume one hit die and 1d4 damage per 1ft length of the monster. The common characteristics of giant beetles are a very good armor class (due to the carapace) and a single, strong bite from the mandibles. Uncommon varieties of giant beetle might have unusual characteristics – the giant fire beetle being a good example.

  • Giant Beetle (5 ft.): HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite 5d4); Move 9; Save 12; CL/XP 5/240; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Beetle, Giant Fire

A giant fire beetle’s oily light-glands glow reddishly, and continue to give off light for 1d6 days after they are removed (shedding light in a 10 ft. radius).

  • Giant Fire Beetle: HD 1+3; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d4+2); Move 12; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Light glands.

Source: Monstrosities

Beetle, Giant Huhu

This large winged beetle has a brown and yellow-striped carapace, horny black antennae and powerful jaws. Its barbed legs hook relentlessly into the victim’s hair, fur or clothing. It is attracted to light sources. The pale yellow HuHu grubs are extremely nutritious and taste like peanut butter. (Author: Mudguard).

  • Giant HuHu Beetle: HD 1+3;AC 4 [15]; Atk Bite (2d6); Move 9 (18 fly); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Grab hold.

Source: Monstrosities

Beetle, Giant Rhinoceros

Giant rhinoceros beetles are 12-foot long beetles with grayish-brown carapaces and wing-covers and a large brownish-black “horns” between its mandibles. They are found in the warm jungles and forests of the world and spend their days searching for plants, fruits, and berries on which to sustain themselves. Giant rhinoceros beetles can trample smaller creatures by simply moving over them, inflicting 3d6 points of damage (save for half damage).

  • Giant Rhinoceros Beetle: HD 12; AC 1 [18]; Atk Bite (2d8) and gore (2d6); Move 9; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Trample (3d6)

Source: Giant Rhinoceros Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Beetle, Giant Saw-Toothed

A giant saw-toothed beetle has oversized serrated mandibles to chew and crush its food. These creatures are about 6 feet long. Their wing covers and carapace are silvery-green in color and have a dull sheen. Their legs are long with spiraling bands of green and black. Its compound eyes aid it in detecting creatures moving close by, though it usually relies on motion and scent to pick up its prey. If a serrated beetle hits with a bite, it holds the prey in is massive mandibles, automatically inflicting 1d6 damage in the next round until the creature is freed.

  • Giant Saw-Toothed Beetle: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 12; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Grab

Source: Giant Saw-Toothed Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Beetle, Giant Slicer

This creature appears as a giant beetle with a triangular head and two long, razor sharp mandibles. Its body is black in color. It closely resembles a large stag beetle and is often mistaken for such. However, the slicer beetle is more aggressive than the stag beetle. The creature dines on carrion, fresh meat, and leaves. Slicer beetles are about 10 feet long, but can grow to lengths of 20 feet or more. If a slicer beetle scores a natural 20 on its attack roll and its victim fails a saving throw, it severs one of the opponent’s extremities (roll 1d6: 1-3 arm, 4-6 leg; 50% chance of either right or left).

  • Giant Slicer Beetle: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk Bite (3d8); Move 9; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Vorpal bite

Source: Giant Slicer Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Beetle, Giant Water

The highly aggressive giant water beetles average about 6 feet long though they can grow to a length of about 10 feet. Their body is cylindrical and hydrodynamic, tapering into a pointed tail section. Their body shape allows them to move rapidly through the water and also aids them in hunting, allowing them to dive quickly through the water when a target is spotted. Typical coloration is black or dark brown with their wing covers following their body coloration. Some species of giant water beetle have yellow legs or a silver stripe on their dorsal side. Females are slightly larger than males and have a red band around their front legs. They rarely come on land, and never venture far from a water source. Once per minute, a water beetle can eject a foul-smelling liquid from its abdomen that sickens creatures nearby.

  • Giant Water Beetle: HD 3; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 6 (Swim 24); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Stench spray, aquatic

Source: Giant Water Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Beetle, Requiem

The gigantic requiem beetle has a dark red carapace, blackish-red wing covers, and black legs. Two large claw-like pincers protrude from its front to slash and rip the air around the creature. Its oversized mandibles are dark reddish-black. Requiem beetles measure about 40 feet long and weigh about 18 tons. A requiem beetle that hits a single opponent with both claws automatically constricts for 5d6 points of damage. Whenever a requiem beetle moves more than 10 feet in a round, all creatures within 10 feet must save or fall down as the earth shakes.

  • Requiem Beetle: HD 18; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (3d6+4) and bite (2d8+4); Move 18; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 20/4400; Special: Constrict, earth-shaking

Source: Requiem Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Behir

The behir is a serpentine monster that can slither like a snake or use its dozen legs to move with considerable speed. A behir is about 40 feet long. Most are a deep blue color. Behirs attack by biting, and will swallow prey whole on a natural roll of 20. They also lash their bodies around prey (to hit), and on the first round following this attack they can bring 6 claws into play (6 attacks, 1d6 hit points per attack).

Behirs also have a breath weapon – they can spit a bolt of lightning once per 10 rounds, inflicting 24 points of damage (2 per hit die, for smaller or larger behirs). A successful saving throw indicates half damage.

  • Behir: HD 12; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 15; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Constrict and claw, lightning breath.

Source: Monstrosities

Belabra (Tangler)

Belabras resemble a man-sized flying jellyfish with a hard, chitinous shell and twelve long tentacles. Four thin, pupil-less eyestalks protrude from its cap. A small, bird-like beak is hidden among its array of tentacles. Its cap is blackish-gray and its eyestalks are dark gray. They dwell in deep forests and thick undergrowth and sustain themselves on a diet of plants, berries, and rodents. Particularly hungry belabras will attack larger creatures, such as humanoids. Each time a belabra is hit with a slashing or piercing weapon, all creatures within a 10-foot radius must succeed on a saving throw or be sprayed by the creature’s acidic blood. A creature that fails its save is partially blinded and overcome with fits of sneezing. Both effects last 1d6+2 rounds. An affected creature takes a –4 penalty to hit, –1 penalty to AC, loses its Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) and moves at half speed. All checks relying on vision have a 50% chance of failing. A belabra’s tentacles are lined with razor-sharp barbs. Anytime a grappled creature attempts to break free and fails, it takes 1d4 points of piercing damage from the barbs.

  • Belabra: HD 4; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (2d6) or 12 tentacles (1d2) and bite (1d6); Move 3 (Fly 9); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Acidic blood, tentacle barbs

Source: Belabra from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Ed Greenwood.

Bhuta

When a person is murdered, the spirit sometimes clings to the Material Plane, refusing to accept its mortal death. This spirit, called a bhuta, possesses its original body and seeks out those responsible for its murder. It will never rest until those responsible are sought out and slain. Since the transformation into unlife is almost instant (occurring within 1-2 hours after death), the bhuta appears as it did in life for about 2 weeks, taking on a more decayed appearance thereafter. Close inspection (spot on a roll of 1-2 on 1d6) reveals slight decay, and the body still shows signs of any trauma suffered prior to death (wounds, disease, burns, or the like), but outwardly, the bhuta for the most part appears as a normal creature of its race. In its undead state, the bhuta sustains itself on a diet of flesh, preferring that of humans and elves. A bhuta that scores two successful claw attacks on an opponent in the same round fastens its hands around its opponent’s throat and deals 1d6+1 damage per round until the hold is broken with a successful attack by the victim. The bhuta’s main objective is revenge on the person that killed it. So long as the bhuta and its killer are on the same plane of existence, it can find its target unerringly.

  • Belabra: HD 7; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 12; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Death grip

Source: Belabra from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Biclops

A biclops appears to be a filthy ettin, but has one eye in the center of each ugly head. They are feared by less intelligent monsters such as hill giants and trolls, whom they beat to death on sight. They throw two rocks for 3d6 points of damage.

  • Belabra: HD 12+2; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 weapons (4d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Hurl boulders

Source: Belabra from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Birhaakamen (Wild Bird-men)

Birhaakamen are bird-men, entirely feathered, with beaks and clawed hands at their wing-joints. They live in tribal aeries and are generally not civilized. They carry javelins, and some of the more civilized aeries arm their warriors with spears and shields. These more advanced bird-men may wear scraps of armor, increasing their AC to 4 [15].

  • Birhaakaman: HD 1+3; AC 6 [13] or 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d2) and beak (1d3) or by weapon (1d8); Move 12 (Fly 18); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Black Pudding

Black puddings are amorphous globs with an acidic surface. They are subterranean predators and scavengers. Any weapon or armor contacting a black pudding will be eaten away by the acid as follows: weapon (1 hit by the weapon), chainmail or lesser armor (1 hit by pudding), plate mail (2 hits by pudding). If a weapon or armor is magical, it can take an additional hit per +1 before being dissolved.

  • Black Pudding: HD 10; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 attack (3d8); Move 6; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Acidic surface, immune to cold, divides when hit with lightning.

Source: Monstrosities

Bleeding Horror

Created by the axe of blood, these foul undead creatures drip with the blood they were so willing to sacrifice to the hungry blade. They are filled with the unquenchable desire for blood to feed the weapon that created them. Bleeding horrors appear as skeletons or sunken corpses covered in and continuously dripping thick red blood. Their eyes glow with a desire for blood. They may wear armor and wield weapons.

A living creature within 60 feet that views a bleeding horror must succeed on a saving throw or take 1d6 points of strength damage. This damage cannot reduce a victim’s strength below 0, but anyone reduced to strength 0 is helpless.

When a bleeding horror successfully hits a living opponent with a claw attack, it heals a number of hit points equal to the damage dealt. However, it can’t gain more than the subject’s current hit points, which is enough to kill the subject. A bleeding horror can’t gain more hit points than the maximum hit points allowed by its Hit Dice.

If a bleeding horror hits an opponent with both claw attacks in a single round, that opponent suffers catastrophic blood expulsion, taking 1d4 points of constitution damage. A successful saving throw reduces the damage by half. For each point of constitution damage dealt, a bleeding horror gains 4 temporary hit points. Any creature slain by the blood consumption attack of a bleeding horror becomes a bleeding horror in 1d4 minutes under the command of its creator.

If the axe of blood is taken from a bleeding horror before the creature is destroyed, it can find it unerringly.

Minor Artifact: The Axe of Blood

The axe of blood is rather nondescript, being made of dull iron. Only the large, strange rune carved into the side of its double-bladed head gives any immediate indication that the axe may be more than it seems. The rune is one of lesser life stealing, carved on it long ago by a sect of evil sorcerers. This is, in fact, the only remaining copy of that particular rune, thus making the axe a valuable item. Further inspection reveals another strange characteristic: the entire length of the axe’s long haft of darkwood is wrapped in a thick leather thong stained black from years of being soaked in blood and sticky to the touch. When held, the axe feels strangely heavy but well balanced, and it possesses a keenly sharp blade.

Until activated, the axe is just a +1 battleaxe. The wielder must consult legend lore or some other similar source of information to learn the ritual required to feed the axe. Despite the gruesome ritual required to power the axe, the weapon is not chaotic but is instead neutral. Bound inside it is a rather savage earth spirit.

The axe draws power from its wielder in order to become a mighty magic weapon. Each day, the wielder of the axe can choose to “feed” the axe, sacrificing some of his blood in a strange ritual. This ritual takes 30 minutes and must be done at dawn.

Using the axe, the wielder opens a wound on his person (dealing 1d6 points of damage) and feeds the axe with his own blood. The wielder sacrifices blood in the form of hit points. For each 1d6 hit points sacrificed, the wielder gains a +1 bonus on attack rolls and weapon damage rolls with the axe (to a maximum of +3). Hit points sacrificed to the axe cannot be healed magically, but heal at the rate of 1 point per day. Similarly, the damage caused by the opening of the wound may not be healed by any means until the sacrificed hit points are regained.

There is a chance that the hit points sacrificed to the axe is lost permanently. If the wielder always skips a day in between powering the axe and always powers the axe with the morning ritual, there is no chance of permanent loss. If, however, the axe is fed on consecutive days, there is a 1% chance plus a 1% cumulative chance per consecutive day the axe is powered that hit points sacrificed to the axe on that day is permanently lost.

If reduced to 0 hit points as a result of feeding the axe, the wielder becomes a bleeding horror.

  • Bleeding Horror: HD 6; AC -1 [20]; Atk Axe of Blood (2d6) or 2 claws (1d8); Move 12; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Blood consumption, horrific appearance, +1 or better weapon to hit, magic resistance (10%)

Source: Bleeding Horror from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Clark Peterson and Scott Greene.

Blindeim

Blindheims are 4-foot tall frog-like humanoids with large, bulbous eyes that constantly emit bright yellow beams of light. A blindheim’s skin is mottled yellow, growing darker across its back. Its feet are webbed as are its claws. Blindheims dwell in underground caverns and sustain themselves on a diet of fungi, molds, and small rodents. An extra eyelid allows the blindheim to “turn off” its eyes when it is sleeping or resting. A dead blindheim’s eyes are dull gold in color. A blindheim can turn its eyes on and off as it wishes, but always leaves them on during combat. When open, the eyes emit a 30-foot cone of light. It can see normally in this light and functions normally in areas of magical darkness. A creature looking at a blindheim when its eye beams are “on” must succeed on a saving throw or be blinded for 1 hour.

  • Blindheim: HD 4; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Eye beams

Source: Bleindheim from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Roger Musson.

Blink Dog

Blink dogs are pack hunters, intelligent and usually friendly to those who are not of evil intent. They can teleport short distances (without error) and attack in the same turn – in most cases (75%) a blink dog will be able to teleport behind an opponent and attack from the rear (with appropriate bonuses).

  • Blink Dog: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL L; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Teleport.

Source: Monstrosities

Blood Bush

A blood bush is a 3-foot-tall flowering bush with a thick trunk and small whip-like branches. Each branch is topped with a blood-red flower and deep, rich green leaves. A victim hit by a dart must make a saving throw or be paralyzed for 1d6+1 rounds.

  • Blood Bush: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 4 tendrils (1d4), 6 flower darts (1d2); Move 0; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Paralysis

Source: Blood Bush from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Lance Hawvermale.

Blood Hawk

The blood hawk is nearly identical to a normal hawk and is often mistaken for one, but it is stronger and far more aggressive than a normal hawk and has red talons and a dull red beak. Blood hawks love the taste of human flesh and are relentless in their hunt of human prey. They often steal gems from the corpses of their humanoid prey, which they use to line their nests.

  • Blood Hawk: HD 1; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d4) and bite (1d6); Move 6 (Flying 36); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None

Source: Blood Hawk from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Lance Hawvermale.

Bloodsuckle

A bloodsuckle is a nightmarish bush consisting of a bulbous root from which sprout several vine-like tendrils. The tendrils end in hollow, needle-like points and can reach lengths of 60 feet. Woody limbs as thick as a human’s leg sprout from the trunk of the bloodsuckle. The leaves of a bloodsuckle bush are a vile greenish color, and constantly ooze a sticky sap that reeks of decay, filth, and other unmentionable odors. Bloodsuckles are semi-intelligent. immobile plants that gain nourishment from the blood of living creatures. A bloodsuckle injects its sap into a host using its tendrils so it can control the creature to attack others or approach the plant to drain its blood. If a bloodsuckle hits a victim with both tendrils, it automatically begins draining the creature’s blood (1d4 hit points per round). Once per month, a bloodsuckle can generate a walnut-sized seed that it implant’s in a host’s body. The host is then sent away, and a new bloodsuckle sprouts in the victim in 1d4 days. If threatened, the bloodsuckle can produce a high-pitched whine that draws nearby hosts to defend it.

  • Bloodsuckle: HD 6; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 tendrils (1d4), limb rake (1d6); Move 0; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Blood drain, create host, grab, summon host, seed

Source: Bloodsuckle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Bloody Bones

Bloody bones are evil undead spirits that haunts caverns, caves, and other desolate places. Their true origins are unknown, but they are believed to be the undead remains of those who desecrate evil temples and are punished by the gods for their wrongdoings. It appears as a skeletal humanoid with bits of muscle and sinew hanging from its body. Four long, sinewy tendrils writhe from its midsection. The entire creature constantly oozes a mixture of blood and mucus. Its eye sockets are hollow and show no pupils. A creature hit by the monster’s tendril attack must pass a saving throw or be held fast and dragged toward the bloody bones. The bloody bones’ tendrils have 10 hit points each and an AC of 3 [16]. Bloody bones are difficult to wrestle or snare due to the constant flow of blood and mucus across their bodies. Webs, magic or otherwise, do not affect bloody bones, and they usually wiggle free from most other forms of confinement.

  • Bloody Bones: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 tendrils (see below) and 2 claws (1d6); Move 12; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Tendrils, slippery, resistance to fire (50%)

Source: Bloody Bones from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Boalisk

A boalisk is a constrictor snake 12 to 30 feet long with dark scales interspersed with pale green and yellow daubs of color to help it blend in with its surroundings on the forest floor. The eyes of a boalisk are large and reddish in color. They dwell in misty jungles and along dark riverbanks. Boalisks have a powerful bite attack. Victims of a successful bite attack must succeed at a saving throw or be ensnared by the serpent’s coils and constricted for 1d8 points of damage per round. The boalisk’s more potent ability is its terrible gaze. Those within 30 feet that meet the boalisk’s gaze must succeed on a saving throw or contract black rot. Black rot strikes at a victim almost immediately, causing the skin to become black and glossy and terrible swelling in the joints and face. Each day, a victim of the rot loses 1d6 points of constitution and charisma if they fail a saving throw. The disease persists until the victim succeeds at two consecutive daily saving throws. A victim of the disease dies when their constitution reaches 0. A recovering victim regains 1 point of charisma and 1 point of constitution per day of rest.

  • Boalisk: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d8); Move 9 (Climb 9/Swim 9); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP6/400; Special: Constrict, gaze

Source: Boalisk from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Boar, Giant

  • Boar, Giant: HD 5; AC 7[12]; Atk gore (4d4); Move 15; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special continues to attack for 2 rounds after reaching 0 hit points.

Boar, Wild

Boars continue to attack for two rounds after they are actually killed before they drop dead. These stats might also be used for your “blue tusken-hogs of the Ymar Plains,” or whatever is appropriate for your campaign. Sows have the same hit dice, but do not have tusks. They bite viciously, however, inflicting 1d6 points of damage.

  • Wild Boar: HD 3+3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 gore (3d4); Move 15; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: continue attacks 2 rounds after death.

Source: Monstrosities

Bog Beast

Bog beasts make their homes in bogs and swamps and feed on creatures that dwell there. They are avid hunters and a bog beast’s hunting area usually covers a large expanse of ground several miles around its lair. It makes its lair amid overgrown swamplands and attacks just about any creature that travels too close to its lair. They are large humanoids with shaggy fur and clawed hands and feet. Two, long, upright tusks protrude from its mouth. Its eyes are dull brown and its fur is brownish-yellow. A bog beast stands over 9 feet tall and weighs around 1,100 pounds. They seem to be able to communicate with one another through a series of guttural grunts and growls, but do not speak any known language. If a bog beast succeeds on both claw attacks against an opponent, they rend for an additional 2d6 damage. Characters who suffer damage from a bog beast’s claws must pass a saving throw or come down with a case of swamp fever. The fever causes swelling of the joints and fills the lungs with fluid. The diseased character’s movement rate is cut in half and they suffer a -2 penalty to AC and saving throws. Each day, they receive a saving throw at a -2 penalty to shake off the disease.

  • Bog Beast: HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d6 + swamp fever); Move 12; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Swamp fever, rend with claws

Source: Bog Beast from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Bog Creeper

The bog creeper is a creature native to the thickest, darkest swamps. It superficially resembles a man-sized rotted tree trunk sprouting several thorny tendrils each about 10 feet long and a single 6-foot long limb. Bog creepers are carnivorous, lurking amid dead trees and stumps waiting to ambush unsuspecting prey. When prey comes within range, a bog creeper lashes out with its single limb and slashes with its tendrils. If two tendrils hit the same opponent, the creature grabs the victim and constricts it for 2d4 damage as it transfers the prey to its mouth. Three times per day, a bog creeper can vomit digestive sap on opponents (2d8 points of damage; save for half).

  • Bog Creeper: HD 7; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 slam (1d6), 4 tendrils (1d4) or bite (2d4); Move 4 (Swim 9); Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Constrict, spit acid, camouflage

Source: Bog Creeper from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Bog Mummy

Bog mummies resemble normal mummies, but are covered with a thin layer of swamp mud. Bog mummies rarely leave the swamp where they were formed. They hate life and attack any living creature that trespasses in their swamp. Bog mummies can only be harmed by magic weapons. Its touch infects victims who fail a saving throw with bog rot, a supernatural disease that does not allow wounds to heal naturally, and cuts magical healing in half until cured with the cure disease spell. Humanoids killed by a bog mummy rise as bog mummies themselves in 1d4 days unless their bodies are removed from the swamp or a cure disease spell is cast on the corpse. A bog mummy’s movement is unaffected by mud, marshes and swamps.

  • Bog Mummy: HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (1d6 + bog rot); Move 9; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Bog rot, +1 or better weapon to hit, resistance to fire (50%)

Source: Bog Mummy from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Bruce Cordell.

Bogeyman

A bogeyman is a man-sized undead that lacks a corporeal body. A bogeyman can create realistic illusions and sounds to scare victims, and can only be hit by magical weapons. An opponent seeing a bogeyman must make a saving throw or run in fear (as per the spell).

  • Bogeyman: HD 6; AC 5 [12]; Atk claw (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Frighten, create illusions, magical weapons to hit

Source: Bogeyman from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Boggart

Although a boggart’s natural form is that of a small will-o’-wisp, boggarts usually take the form of a 2-foot tall humanoid with unkempt dark hair, an untrimmed shaggy beard, thick mustache, pale skin and green eyes. The boggart is a relative of the will-o-wisp. Sages believe it to be a sort of “larval” or immature form of said creature. Boggarts are immune to most spells or spell-like abilities that allow spell resistance, except magic missile, protection from evil, protection from evil 10-ft. radius and maze. Boggarts can use ESP (as the spell) at will and can become invisible for 10 minutes each day. Once per day, a boggart can unleash a screech that causes confusion (per the spell) in all those within 30 feet who fail a saving throw. The confusion lasts for 6 rounds. Each additional boggart within 10 feet that joins the screeching imposes a -1 penalty to the saving throw. Boggarts not only deliver electrical shocks with their physical attacks, but also throw electrical current up to 10 feet, dealing 2d6 points of damage (save for half).

  • Boggart: HD 6; AC -1 [20]; Atk Electrical discharge (2d6); Move 9; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Immune to magic, magical abilities

Source: Boggart from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Bone Cobbler

The bone cobbler is a tattered and desiccated humanoid often mistaken for a zombie in weak light. The bone cobbler is a malign and evil creature that delights in slaying its opponents and stripping the flesh from their bones. Bone cobblers take the skeletal remains of those they kill and combine them with other bones in their lair. From these bones they sculpt and form weird humanoid or half-humanoid skeletal statues. Once per day, a bone cobbler can animate up to 5 skeletal statues within 30 feet. These creatures fight as skeletons, though their forms and structures do not necessarily resemble anything remotely humanoid. A bone cobbler can rapidly strip all the flesh from a human-sized creature in 3 rounds using its claws and hammers. Once stripped, the bone cobbler devours the flesh and collects the victim’s bones to use in its “sculptures”. A creature slain in this manner can only be brought back to life by a wish spell. Finally, a bone cobbler can bellow forth a cloud of vapors every 1d4+1 rounds that covers a 10-foot-radius area. Creatures within the area must succeed on a saving throw or be slowed (as the slow spell) for 1d4 rounds.

  • Bone Cobbler: HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 hammers (1d4) or 2 claws (1d3); Move 12; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Animate bones, breath weapon

Source: Bone Cobbler from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Bone Mound

When a nugget of pure chaos ends up in the material plane, the result can be a bone mound, a jelly-like creature that exudes a sticky film from its pores. At first glance, a bone mound appears to be a massive heap of bones and broken skeletal remains, for it picks up osseous material that sticks to the slime-beast’s blob-like form, giving it the appearance of a pile of bones. This bone-collecting slime possesses a secondary ability that makes it a truly dangerous foe. In addition to the adhesive film it exudes, the piece of pure chaos at the bone mound’s core gives it an innate ability to animate, partially, the bones that stick to it. The effects of this spell-like ability extend up to 2ft away from the creature’s body. The bone mound can animate 1d6 of the bony remains that have adhered to it each round. Each of these animated body parts may attack once, inflicting 1d4 damage. A cleric may turn these newly living bits of skeletal remains as if they were Type 1 undead. The bone mound may shift its animate dead power from one set of bones to another at any time.

The chaos nugget inside the mound, which looks like a bit of charcoal, is quite dangerous – it dissolves instantly into anyone who touches it, and the victim must make a saving throw at -2 or the nugget will re-form inside his body and he will become a bone mound himself in 1d6 days. (Author: Skathros).

  • Bone Mound: HD 10; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1d6 claw/kick/bite (1d4 each); Move 6; Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Animate Dead, Multiple Attacks.

Source: Monstrosities

Boneneedle

Boneneedles are bloated, yellowish-white blobs of rubbery flesh with spidery legs of black or gold. Two long, sharply-curved mandibles protrude from the monster. The mandibles are glossy-black and hollow, and aid the boneneedle in piercing its prey’s flesh and bone and siphoning off its meal. After feeding, its form takes on a sickly yellow color. The boneneedle’s bite secretes a thick, syrupy neurotoxin that breaks down bone (save resists). A creature with weakened bones suffers an extra +2 damage each time he is struck.

  • Boneneedle: HD 2 AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bite (1d3 + marrow poisoning); Move 18; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Marrow poisoning, aversion to daylight

Source: Boneneedle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Bonesnapper

The bonesnapper resembles a man-sized bipedal dinosaur with gray-green flesh mottled with gray spots. Its eyes are scarlet and its teeth are yellow. Though unintelligent, it is fond of collecting and decorating its lair with the jawbones of its victims.

  • Bonesnapper: HD 4 AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d8) and tail slap (1d3); Move 9; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Surprise on a roll of 1-2 on 1d6

Source: Bonesnapper from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Ian Livingstone.

Bonesucker

This bizarre creature resembles a fleshy tree trunk. Atop its main body protrudes a mass of writhing tentacles that constantly ooze and drip a brownish-yellow fluid. These tentacles appear to be only one or two feet long, but can be extended up to 10 feet. Near the top of its body is a ring of black, unblinking eyes that make it impossible for the monster to be surprised. Bonesuckers stand about 10 feet tall and move about through the use of 5 thick tentacles at their base. They stalk the darkness of wastelands and dank caves. Bonesuckers consume only the bones of an opponent by grabbing it and piercing its flesh with its hollow tentacles. Victims of a successful tentacle attack must pass a saving throw or be held fast and pierced by the hollow, bony protrusions that line the tentacle. These tubes inject digestive enzymes into the bones, inflicting 2d4 points of damage and causing 1d2 points of strength damage each round.

  • Bonesucker: HD 8 AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 tentacles (1d4+4 + liquefy bones); Move 9; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Liquefy bones, +1 or better weapon to hit

Source: Bonesucker from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley

Bookworm

The bookworm is a tiny, 1-inch long, gray, seemingly normal worm. This miniscule creature is the bane of scholars, wizards, and sages, for its primary source of food is the paper, wood, and leather that make up books.

Bookworms cannot harm living creatures, but they burrow through wood, leather, rope, and paper very quickly. They ignore the hardness of such materials, and a burrowing bookworm deals 3 points of damage per round to dead wood, rope, paper, or leather. Bookworms are quick and agile (move 9) and seek to avoid being seen. To this end, they can alter their body color to match that of their surroundings. They surprise on a roll of 1-4 on 1d6.

Scrolls are destroyed in a single round and any spells contained on it are destroyed as well. A spellbook loses one spell level per round that a bookworm spends burrowing into it. For example, a spellbook has 100 pages and can hold a maximum of 100 total spell levels (a spell takes up one page per spell level). Multiple bookworms can destroy a spellbook much faster. Each bookworm burrowing through a book destroys one spell level per round.

A typical lair (or brood) contains 1d4 x 10 bookworms. They are easily killed by attacks that deal damage over an area (such as fire or cold). Consider one worm killed for each point of damage dealt.

Source: Bookworm from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Borsin (Ape Centaur)

A borsin is a creature with the head, arms, and upper body of an ape joined to the body and legs of a quadruped. The lower half may be that of a boar, equine, or hound; these may be a race of battle-beasts magically crossbred in antiquity. A borsin has a savage cunning, and is capable of problem-solving and setting crude traps. They do not use weapons or tools, or carry treasure, although pack leaders will drape themselves in the skins and furs of creatures they have killed – including humans and adventurers.

Borsin form packs led by the strongest member. They attack with two claws and a bite, and use pack tactics to drive opponents and prey into traps, kill zones, or natural hazards such as cliffs and ravines. If both its claws hit the same opponent, a borsin can hug and rend for an additional 2d6 points of damage. Borsin packs stake out their territory by making small cairns topped with the skulls of their kills, and patrol their borders regularly. Borsin are omnivorous and hardy, capable of surviving on plant matter, yet enjoying a fresh kill. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”).

  • Borsin: HD 4; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d4) and 1 bite (1d3); Move 15; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Hug and rend.

Source: Monstrosities

Brainosaurian

Brainosaurians are highly intelligent dinosaurs, possibly the remnant survivors of some ancient saurian civilization. They are the size of an allosaurus, standing approximately ten feet at the shoulder. A brainosaurian is able to communicate with and control most types of dinosaurs, although this control is not perfect: herbivorous dinosaurs will still instinctively keep their distance from carnivores, for example. Brainosaurians are generally found in areas where dinosaurs are common.

Some rare brainosaurians are shamans, able to cast spells as a 4th to 8th level cleric. (Author: Matt Finch).

  • Brainosaurian: HD 10; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws or weapons (1d6) and 1 bite (3d6); Move 15; Save 5; AL Any; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Control Saurian.

Source: Monstrosities

Brainstorm

Brainstorms are creatures that reside in the ethereal plane of existence; they are incorporeal, able to move through solid objects and only vulnerable to magic weapons (and spells). The central body of a brainstorm resembles an almost transparent sphere with a ghostly-looking brain at the center. A brainstorm attacks by sending out waves of mental power in a cone shape, extending 100ft from the creature with a 10ft width at the origin and 100ft wide at the end of the cone. Anything caught within the cone must make a saving throw or be affected by one of the following:

1. Charmed (1d6 rounds)
2. Fear (flee for 1d6 turns)
3. Paralysis (1d6 turns)
4. Unbearable headache (2d6 points of damage, lasts only 1 round)
5. Levitated 10ft from ground
6. Rage (attack allies for 1d6 rounds)
7. Healed by 1d6 hit points
8. Teleported (safely) 1d20 x10ft from present location in random direction
9. Drop all items held
10. Headache (1d6 hit points damage)

Characters that are already under the effects of the brainstorm and are hit a second time by the storm will automatically take 1d2 points of headache damage rather than rolling a second result. If anyone is killed by one of the “headache” results, the character’s head explodes, a problem that must be addressed before raising the character from the dead. (Author: Matt Finch).

  • Brainstorm: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk Special; Move (9 flying); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Brainstorm.

Source: Monstrosities

Brass Man

A brass man is an 8-foot tall humanoid composed of brass and weighing about 900 pounds. Its facial features are exquisitely and delicately worked. Some brass men have ancient runes and symbols carved into their bodies. Many are constructed with weapons, though the average brass golem relies on its fists. In combat, a brass man can spit a 30-foot stream of molten brass every 1d4 rounds (6d6 damage). Lightning slows a brass man, and fire heals it. They are immune to all other spells.

  • Brass Man: HD 10 AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 slam or 1 weapon (3d6); Move 6; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Spit molten brass (6d6), +1 or better magic weapon to hit, slowed by lightning, healed by fire, immune to spells

Source: Brass Man from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Casey Christofferson.

Brownie

A brownie is a timid, quiet fey creature that prefers to live only among its own kind. Most brownies dwell in pastoral areas untouched by civilization, such as deep forests and wild lands far from other creatures. They resemble 18-inch tall elves with greenish skin and brown, gray or tawny hair. Most brownies prefer green or otherwise brightly colored clothing. They may be distant relatives of pixies and halflings, but this has never been proven. In woodland areas, brownies surprise on a roll of 1-4 on 1d6, and is only surprised on a roll of 1 on 1d8. The can use the following spells once per day each: Confusion, continual light, dimension door, protection from evil 10-ft. radius and mirror image.

  • Brownie: HD 1d3 AC 2 [17]; Atk Tiny sword (1d3); Move 9; Save 18; AL L; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Magic resistance (25%), spells

Source: Brownie from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Brume

A brume is an opaque spirit that takes human form. It can only be hit by magical weapons. A brume’s claws cause an opponent to forget everything that has happened in the last 1d6 hours (save resists). A brume can create a billowing fog to appear three times a day.

  • Brume: HD 7 AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 15; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Magical weapons to hit, magical abilities

Source: Brume from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Brykolakas

Brykolakas are 6-foot-tall humanoid creatures with bluish-gray skin and unkempt black or gray hair. They can assume the shape of a dolphin or a manta ray at will. Their eyes burn with a hatred for living creatures, and their hands end in razor-sharp talons with black or broken nails. Brykolakas dress in flowing robes or gowns. When killed, a brykolakas’ body changes into a pool of deadly poison (2d4 points of damage to all within 10 feet). The creature’s claws also carry a deadly infection that deteriorates a victim’s organs (save or die). Any humanoid slain by a byrkolakas rises as a kalanos in 1d4 days under the creature’s control.

  • Brykolakas: HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d6 + infection); Move 6 (Swim 24); Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 4/600; Special: Create spawn, death throes, infection, change shape
  • Kalanos: HD 3; AC 8[11]; Attack 1 slam (1d4 + 1 level drain); Save 14; AL C; Move 6 (Swim 24); CL/XP 4/120; Special: Level drain (1)

Source: Brykolakas from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Buckawn

Buckawns look like halfling-sized humanoids with swarthy skin, dark hair, greenish-brown eyes and brown clothes. Buckawns are somehow related to brownies, but they are nowhere near as kind-hearted and playful. Buckawns are extremely reclusive and rarely have dealings with outside races. Trade of any kind between a buckawn tribe and another race is virtually unheard of. Characters who journey into a buckawn’s realm are usually left alone, providing they themselves leave the buckawn’s realm alone. Buckawns readily use poisoned blades when confronted with a tough opponent, when outnumbered, or when battling opponents for whom they have great disdain. They favor moonseed berries as poison and usually have a plentiful supply readily available (see the sidebar).

Buckawns can use the following spells at will: Phantasmal force, invisibility and insect plague (1/day).

Moonseed Berries

These small berries are bluish-purple and resemble wild grapes. They are highly poisonous and are often mixed with food or crushed and smeared on a weapon or object. The poison is deadly unless the victim succeeds at a saving throw. Even if the saving throw is successful, the poison inflicts 1d8 points of damage. A vial of the poison can be purchased from unsavory types for 1,500 gp.

  • Buckawn: HD 1d6; AC 2[17]; Attack Dagger (1d3) or dart (1d3); Save 12; AL N; Move 6 (Swim 24); CL/XP 2/30; Special: Poison use, spells, magic resistance (10%)

Source: Buckawn from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Bugbear

These large, hairy, goblin-like humanoids are stealthier than their size would suggest, getting the chance to surprise even alert opponents with a roll of 1-3 on a d6 (50%). Bugbears stand from 7-8 ft. in height.

  • Bugbear: HD 3+1; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (2d4) or weapon (1d8+1); Move 9; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Surprise opponents, 50% chance.

Source: Monstrosities

Bulette

Roughly ten feet in height, a bulette (boo-LAY) is covered in natural armor plating like that of an armadillo, and has a beak-like head that opens to show wicked, serrated teeth. These creatures can leap to the attack; in which case they cannot bite, but may attack with all four claws. Bulettes dig underground to surprise their prey, leaving a furrow in the ground as they go, caused by a dorsal crest in the creature’s armor. These voracious hunters eat horses and halflings with gusto, although they will devour anything from badgers to plowshares if their preferred foods are not readily available. Although bulettes burrow, they do not venture further underground, for they are surface predators. When the dorsal crest of the bulette is raised (during combat this is usually only after the thing has been wounded), the area underneath is AC 6 [13], and this vulnerable point can be attacked if the monster is well enough surrounded for its opponents to attack from behind as well as in front.

Bulettes, often called “landsharks,” resemble huge armadillos with wide, tooth-filled mouths. They burrow beneath the ground, and surge upward to attack prey. Bulettes can grow to be ten to fifteen feet long. Horses are a favorite food of bulettes.

  • Bulette: HD 7; AC –2 [21]; Atk Bite (4d12) and 2 Claws (3d6); Move 15 (Burrow 3); Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Leaping, surprise, burrow.
  • Bulette: HD 8; AC –2 [21]; Atk Bite (4d12) and 2 Claws (3d6); Move 15 (Burrow 3); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Leaping, surprise, burrow.
  • Bulette: HD 9; AC –2 [21]; Atk Bite (4d12) and 2 Claws (3d6); Move 15 (Burrow 3); Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Burrow, leaping, surprise.
  • Bulette: HD 10; AC –2 [21]; Atk Bite (4d12) and 2 Claws (3d6); Move 15 (Burrow 3); Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Leaping, surprise, burrow.

Source: Monstrosities

Bumblebee, Giant

Worker

Giant bees live in enormous hives in massive tress, along cliffs or even tunneled through soil. A hive can hold as many as 100 bees and always contains one queen. The poison of a bee does 2d6 points of damage if a saving throw is failed, 1d4 points of damage if the saving throw succeeds.

  • Giant Bumblebee Worker: HD 3; AC 3[16]; Attack Sting (1d6 + poison); Save 14; AL N; Move 6 (Fly 18); CL/XP 5/240; Special: None

Queen

The queen of a giant bee hive is larger and tougher, than the average giant bee. The poison of a bee does 2d6 points of damage if a saving throw is failed, 1d4 points of damage if the saving throw succeeds.

  • Giant Bumblebee Queen: HD 10; AC 3[16]; Attack Sting (1d6 + poison); Save 5; AL N; Move 6 (Fly 18); CL/XP 12/2000; Special: None

Source: Giant Bumblebee from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Bunyip

Bunyips are aquatic creature with the front half of a black seal and the rear half of a grayish-black shark. The bunyip is about 6 feet long, though specimens of up to 10 feet long have been encountered. Bunyips do not attack creatures larger than themselves, except in self-defense or if they detect blood in the water. A bunyip that detects blood in the water goes into a killing frenzy, as do all other bunyips within a 90-foot radius. Frenzied bunyips attack twice per round until either they or their opponents are dead. A frenzied bunyip’s swim speed increases to 24. This frenzy lasts for 10 rounds. When a bunyip roars, all creatures with 4 or less HD within a 100-foot spread must succeed on a saving throw or become panicked for 2d4 rounds, dropping their weapons and fleeing at top speed. If a bunyip scores a natural 20 on its attack roll, it severs one of the opponent’s extremities (roll 1d6: 1-3 arm, 4-6 leg; 50% chance of either right or left).

  • Bunyip: HD 5 AC 4 [15]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move (Swim 21); Save 12; AL N (L tendencies); CL/XP 7/600; Special: Frenzy, roar, vorpal bite

Source: Bunyip from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Burning Dervish

Burning dervishes vary in appearance, but all resemble humans. Skin color, eye color, and hair color range across the same spectrum as that for normal humans. It is said that the burning dervishes were once a noble tribe of jann who sold their souls to the Sultan of Efreet in exchange for greater power over the Elemental Plane of Fire. Burning dervishes can shift into a flame form that resembles a column of fire to deal fire damage with each slam or weapon attack. Each day, a burning dervishes can become invisible 3 times, cast pyrotechnics 3 times, cast enlarge twice and cast produce flame twice. They can also transport themselves and up to eight creatures to any elemental plane, the Astral Plane or the Material Plane.

  • Burning Dervish: HD 8 AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6 + 1d6 fire); Move 9 (Fly 6); Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Flame form, spell abilities, resist fire

Source: Burning Dervish from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Casey Christofferson.

C

Cadaver

Cadavers are humanoids dressed in tattered rags. Rotted flesh reveals corded muscles and sinew stretched tightly over its skeleton. Hollow eye sockets flicker with an unholy fire of orange or yellow light. The cadaver’s mouth is lined with jagged and broken teeth, and its hands end in wicked claws. The creature’s claws and bite transmit horrible diseases that waste victims’ flesh (1d4 hit points damage; save resists). When killed, a cadaver regenerates 1 hit point per round. It stands up ready to fight again when it regains its full hit points. Damage caused by spells is not restored.

  • Cadaver: HD 2 AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d4 + disease) and bite (1d6 + disease); Move 6; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Disease, reanimation

Source: Cadaver from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Cadaver Lord

Cadavers lords are humanoids wearing tattered rags. Rotted flesh reveals corded muscles and sinew stretched tightly over its skeleton. Hollow eye sockets flicker with an unholy fire of orange or yellow light. The cadaver lord’s mouth is lined with jagged and broken teeth, and its hands end in wicked claws. The creature’s claws and bite transmit horrible diseases that waste victims’ flesh (1d4 hit points damage; save resists). When killed, a cadaver lord regenerates 1 hit point per round. It stands up ready to fight again when it regains its full hit points. Damage caused by spells is not restored. A creature slain by a cadaver lord awakens in 1d4 rounds as a cadaver. The cadaver lord can command any undead to do its bidding. Once per day, a cadaver lord can cast darkness (15-foot radius) and fear.

  • Cadaver Lord: HD 5 AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4 + disease) and bite (1d6 + disease); Move 9; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Disease, reanimation, create spawn, command undead, magical abilities, spell resistance (20%), +1 magic weapons to hit

Source: Cadaver Lord from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Camel

Camels can carry 600 pounds of weight. They often have bad dispositions, and they spit.

  • Camel: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d2); Move 20; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Carbuncle

Deep in the tangled underbrush of forests and in the remote regions of dismal swamps and bogs lives a strange creature called the carbuncle. The carbuncle resembles a cross between an anteater and armadillo with a large, red jewel embedded in its head. The carbuncle is a withdrawn creature and seeks to avoid encounters. Should it seek interaction, a carbuncle often begins by proudly announcing the value of the gem in its forehead just to watch the reaction such information arouses. Despite its overall shy nature, the carbuncle has a mischievous side as well, often seeking to join travelers in order to play pranks and gauge the reactions of the unfortunate victims of its curiosity. After joining with a party, a carbuncle will seek to cause discord by using selective telepathic images and prophesies to breed hostility and suspicion between party members. These images can be created once per round in the mind of a single creature within 30 feet of the carbuncle. Affected creatures must pass a saving throw or fall into loud bickering and arguing with those around them. If the affected creatures have different alignments, there is a 50% chance that they attack each other. Carbuncles might also telepathically contact nearby monsters and lead them to attack the party so that it can watch in fascination and read the thoughts of the party as they are attacked, slipping away at an opportune moment. A carbuncle can be coerced to surrender the gem in its forehead with some difficulty and much deception. When a carbuncle is slain, its forehead gem crumbles to dust. If the carbuncle relinquishes its gem, it grows another one within one month. Carbuncles enjoy watching others fight, but avoids engaging in combat itself.

  • Carbuncle: HD 1: AC 1 [18]; Atk Bite (1d2); Move 9; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Discord, foresight, telepathy 100 ft.

Source: Carbuncle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Albie Fiore.

Carrion Creeper

This caterpillar-like creature has 6 waving tentacles which, when they score a hit, require the target to make a saving throw or be paralyzed for 2d6 turns. These underground scavengers can be aggressive when they are hungry. amd tjeu will pursue prey unless distracted. They are good climbers, but when crossing water they are unable to do much more than float with the current.

  • Carrion Creeper: HD 2+4; AC 7 [12]; Atk bite (1hp) 6 tentacles; Move 12; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Tentacles cause paralysis.

Source: Swords & Wizardry Complete Rulebook

Carrion Fly

A carrion fly is 5 feet long and resembles a large, white grub with wings and no legs. Its head has large black eyes and a small mouth ringed with four long tentacles. It attacks with its tentacles, attempting to paralyze its prey. Once its victim is paralyzed, it will land and begin vomiting digestive acids to melt the victim into a suitable meal of goo. It can also spit these digestive acids at its target from a distance. (Author: the Lizard of Oz).

  • Carrion Fly: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 4 tentacles (paralyze) or 1 spit (2d4); Move 3 (fly 18); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Paralyze, acid

Source: Monstrosities

Carrion Moth

Carrion moths resemble giant moths with long, beautiful wings covered in rippling patterns resembling skulls. Its head is centipede-like, with four long tentacles surrounding its mouth, which has a single pair of needle-like mandibles. Just as the caterpillar grows into a moth, sages believe the carrion crawler eventually sheds its form and transforms into the carrion moth. The carrion moth grows to a maximum length of 20 feet. Its wings are lined with tiny holes and veins that allow the carrion moth to emit a whining drone that affects all creatures that hear it. Affected creatures must pass a saving throw or be confused (as the spell) for 2d4 rounds. Creatures hit by the carrion moth’s tentacles must pass a saving throw or be paralyzed for 2d6 rounds. Carrion moths are attracted to the stench of decaying flesh and the light of anything larger than a torch or lantern. When a carrion moth dies, its carcass splits open and releases a foul-smelling gas. All living creatures (except other carrion moths) within 5 feet of the carcass must succeed on a saving throw or be nauseated for 1d4+1 rounds.

  • Carrion Moth: HD 5: AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 tentacles (paralysis) and bite (1d6); Move 12 (Fly 24); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Drone, paralysis, stench

Source: Carrion Moth from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Casey Christofferson and Scott Greene.

Caryatid Column

A caryatid column is akin to the stone golem in that it is a magical construct created by a spellcaster. They look like exquisitely sculpted and chiseled statues of beautiful female warriors carrying longswords. The longsword is constructed of steel, but is melded with the column and made of stone until the column animates. Caryatid columns are programmed as guardians and activate when certain conditions or stipulations are met or broken (such as a living creature enters a chamber guarded by a caryatid column). It does not move more than 50 feet from the area it is guarding or protecting. They are immune to all spells except transmute rock to mud, which deals 1d6 points of damage per caster level to the caryatid column, transmute mud to rock, which heals the caryatid column of all damage and stone to flesh, which makes it subject to normal damage from weapons and suspends its immunity to magic for 1 round. Whenever a weapon strikes the caryatid column, the wielder must pass a saving throw or the weapon shatters into pieces. Magic weapons add their enchantment bonus to the saving throw.

  • Caryatid Column: HD 5: AC 5 [14]; Atk Longsword (1d8+1); Move 9; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Immune to magic, half damage from normal weapons, shatter weapons

Source: Caryatid Column from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Jean Wells.

Cat, Feral Undead

Feral undead cats look like they were created by zombie-raising magic, but they are actually things quite unlike normal animated undead such as skeletons or zombies. These undead cats are possessed of an animal cunning akin to that of ghouls (although with less intelligence), and they are not slow moving as zombies are. Like ghouls, they tend to form into packs. If a person is scratched more than three times by undead feral cats (not necessarily the same one), he must make a saving throw or be paralyzed for 1d6 turns. After the first set of three scratches, every subsequent scratch requires a saving throw. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Feral Undead Cat: HD 1d4hp; AC 8 [11]; Atk 2 claws (1hp); Move 12; Save 18; AL N; CL/XP B/10; Special: Paralyzing scratch (after first 3 hits).

Source: Monstrosities

Caterprism

A caterprism is a caterpillar made of crystal with hexagonal body segments and twelve sharply angled legs. Each body segment is about 2 feet long and contains a single pair of legs. The head of a caterprism is caterpillar-like, with large faceted eyes and huge mandibles. Three times per day, a caterprism can spew forth a crystalline silk up to 20 feet that instantly solidifies into a rock-like substance. Creatures caught in the silk are impaled for 3d6 points of damage (save for half) as it hardens. The crystalline mandibles of a caterprism are extremely sharp. If a caterprism rolls a natural 20 with its bite attack, it severs the head of its opponent.

  • Caterprism: HD 6: AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 legs (1d8) and bite (1d6); Move 9; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Crystal silk, crystalline mandibles

Source: Caterprism from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Caterwaul

Caterwauls are semi-intelligent bipedal felines with dark, blue fur and long tails. Caterwauls are terribly quick, and they use this speed to run down their prey. The caterwaul’s lair is most often a cave littered with sticks, twigs, and leaves, with walls covered in scratch marks where the beast has honed its claws. Once every 10 rounds, a caterwaul can emit a piercing screech that deals 1d8 points of damage to all creatures within 60 feet that hear it. A creature that makes a successful saving throw takes half damage. About 1 in 6 caterwauls is so quick that it enjoys a +2 bonus to AC and can make an additional claw attack each round.

  • Caterwaul: HD 5: AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4) and bite (1d6); Move 21 (Climb 9); Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Screech

Source: Caterwaul from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Albie Fiore.

Catoblepas

These medieval monsters resemble giant warthogs, but they are so hideous that their appearance can cause death (saving throw). If the first glance doesn’t kill, each round of viewing the beast can still stun the viewer into immobility for 1d3 turns.

  • Catoblepas: HD 6; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Lethal appearance.

Source: Monstrosities

Cattle

Cattle include oxen and cows. Bulls inflict 1d8 points of damage instead of 1d6.

  • Cow/Ox: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 gore (1d6); Move 18; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Cave Cricket

Cave crickets are larger versions of normal crickets (3 feet long) and, much like the smaller crickets they resemble, are relatively harmless. The cave cricket’s chirping can be heard to a range of 300 feet. Creatures within 20 feet of a chirping cave cricket cannot be heard unless they scream. Spellcasters in the area must succeed on a saving throw to successfully cast a spell. The chirping increases the chance of wandering monsters by 30%. Cave cricket usually avoid combat, making a couple kick attacks against an attacker and then fleeing.

  • Cave Cricket: HD 1: AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 kicks (1d4); Move 12; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Chirp

Source: Cave Cricket from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Cave Eel

Cave eels burrow through stone with sharp teeth, but otherwise look like large eels. They usually attack by reaching from their burrows in cave walls to bite. In general, these creatures congregate in groups.

  • Cave eel: HD 2; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 1; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Strike from cave walls.

Source: Monstrosities

Cave Fisher

The cave fisher is a 7-foot long insect-like creature with a hard outer shell. It has eight legs, two of which end in serrated pincers. The cave fisher’s snout fires a strong, web-like adhesive filament it uses to reel in its prey. The cave fisher lairs on ledges and cliffs underground, where it can quickly strike and reel in its prey. Its lair is always littered with bones and gear from its previous victims. Often, the ground and walls nearby are covered with this filament. The cave fisher’s preferred method of attack is to anchor itself to its ledge and string its filament across the ground of its lair. When a living creature touches or passes near the filament (1 in 6 chance of spotting the filament, 2 in 6 for elves), the fisher attempts to trap it and reel it in. If the cave fisher fails this, it can fire its filament at an opponent up to 60 feet away. If a cave fisher hits with its filament attack, the filament latches onto the opponent’s body. This deals no damage but drags the stuck opponent 10 feet closer each subsequent round unless that creature breaks free. An application of liquid with high alcohol content dissolves the adhesive and forces the cave fisher to release its hold. The filament has 10 hit points and is AC 2 [17]. If the filament is severed, it grows back within 1 hour.

  • Cave Fisher: HD 3: AC 3 [16]; Atk Filament (see text) and 2 claws (1d6); Move 6; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Filaments

Source: Cave Fisher from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Lawrence Schick.

Cave Leech

Cave leeches measure about 8 feet long and have a flattened semi-translucent body colored a sickly yellow or pale gray. Eight whip-like tentacles, each about 6 feet long protrude from the cave leech’s body near its head. These tentacles contain rigid hairs that let the cave leech drain 1d4 hit points worth of blood with each strike. Hundreds of smaller tentacles line its body and aid in locomotion. The cave leech has a large, round mouth ringed with dozens of razor-like teeth.

  • Cave Fisher: HD 5: AC 9 [10]; Atk 8 tentacles (1d4 blood drain) or bite (1d6); Move 3; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Blood Drain

Source: Cave Fisher from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Cave Moray

Cave morays are not related to moray eels, their name coming instead for a similarity in ferocity and habit between the two creatures. The cave moray is a slug-like creature, brownish-gray in color, about 5 feet long and 1 foot thick. Cave morays make their lairs underground in abandoned mines, dungeons, or natural occurring caves, usually near corridors, hallways or other areas of high traffic. Its lair is a burrow, just large enough for its body dug into the walls. Only one cave moray inhabits each burrow. Cave morays wait in their burrows, usually with a fellow on the opposite side of the passage, to ambush anyone walking down their passage. Cave morays enjoy a +1 bonus to hit when they attack a surprised opponent.

  • Cave Fisher: HD 4: AC 1 [18]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 6; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Recoil attack, surprise on 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Cave Fisher from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Centaur

Half man, half horse, centaurs are fierce warriors and well-known creatures of mythology. The referee may choose any “version” of the centaur from myth or folklore for his campaign: some are evil, some aloof, and some are soothsayers.

  • Centaur: HD 4; AC 5 [14] or 4 [15] with shield; Atk 2 kicks (1d6) and weapon; Move 18; Save 13; AL Any; CL/XP 4/120; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Centipede Nest (Swarm)

A nesting of centipedes is a vast collection of normal centipedes, often combined with a few other sorts of bugs that tend to share the same living space: cockroaches and spiders, generally. Such vermin are not appreciably dangerous individually, but when a great number of them are disturbed at once they can present a serious threat. A party will normally encounter a nest of centipedes by accidentally disturbing the nest itself. Moving large wooden beams and prying into ancient masonry entail the risk of arousing one of these huge colonies. The centipedes of the nest are treated, for the sake of convenience, as a single monster. The nesting’s hit dice represent the amount of damage required to scatter and kill enough of the swarming vermin so that, as a group, they no longer pose a threat.

If a nest of centipedes manages to swarm over a character (either by landing on him or by moving around him), that character will sustain 1hp of damage per round automatically from the resulting bites. Moreover, even if the character subsequently moves away from the central mass of the nest, he will continue to sustain 1 hp of damage per round until a total of three rounds have been spend picking away and killing the centipedes which remain on him. Other characters may assist with this task, each lessening the time required by one round.

A centipede nest is immune to any damage other than that caused by a bludgeoning weapon such as a mace (although the mere expedient of kicking and stomping can inflict 1d2 hps damage with a successful hit). Any spell which affects an area rather than a single target (such as burning hands) will inflict double damage. For every five hit points of damage inflicted by a nest of centipedes against a single opponent, there is enough poison injected into the victim’s body to cause paralysis for 3-12 turns. Fortunately, the poison is relatively weak (+2 on saving throw). (Author: Matt Finch – First appeared in Monsters of Myth, published by First Edition Adventure Games.)

  • Centipede Nest (Swarm): HD 3; AC 7[12]; Atk 1 (1hp + non-lethal poison); Move 3; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Immune to all but blunt weapons, non-lethal poison.

Source: Monstrosities

Centipedes, Giant

Centipede, Giant (Small, Lethal)

Lethal giant centipedes of the small size inflict a deadly bite (+4 bonus to saving throw), but cause no damage if the saving throw is successful.

  • Giant Centipede (small, lethal): HD: 1d2; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (0 + poison); Move 13; Save 18; AL N; CL/XP1/15; Special poison bite (+4 save or die)

Centipede, Giant (Small, Non-lethal)

The non-lethal variety of giant centipede has a painful bits but its poison is only crippling, not lethal. Failing a saving throw (at a +4 bonus) against the poison of this centipede causes 1d4 rounds of crippling pain (the victim is helpless, as when asleep). Additionally, the limb (roll 1d4) is temporarily crippled (treat as a disease) for 2d4 days. A crippled leg reduces movement by 50%; a crippled shield arm cannot wield weapon or shield; a crippled sword arm attacks at -4. A second bite on a leg reduces movement to one quarter normal, and a third bite to the legs reduces movement to 1 foot per minute (prone, dragging oneself by the arms).

  • Giant Centipede (small, non-lethal): HD: 1d2; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (0 + poison); Move 13; Save 18; CL/XP B/10; Special Non-lethal poison bite, +4 save;

Centipede, Giant (Man-sized)

The man-sized giant centipede is a deadly predator with armored segments, a strong bite, and a lethal (though relatively weak) poison.

  • Man-sized Giant Centipede (7ft): HD: 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d8 + poison); Move 15; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special Poison bite (+6 save or die)

Centipede, Giant (Large, 20 ft. long)

A twenty-foot long horror of chitin, multiple legs, and clashing pincers dripping with venom.

  • Large Giant Centipede (20 ft.): HD: 4; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 bite (3d8); Move 18; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special Poison bite (+4 save or die).

Source: Monstrosities

Cerberus

The triple-headed Cerberus (there is thankfully only one) is the guardian of Hades. He appears as a 10-foot long, three-headed black mastiff of the Molossian breed. Cerberus is tasked with the duty of keeping dead souls in Hades. If a dead soul attempts to pass beyond the Gates of Hades and back into the land of the living, Cerberus attacks relentlessly until that soul returns to Hades. If slain, the soul is immediately devoured by Cerberus and is lost forever. Cerberus is also tasked with keeping living creatures out of the land of the dead (adventurers being what they are, they love to journey to Hades). Living creatures that attempt to move past Cerberus into Hades (through the main gates) are immediately attacked.

Cerberus has a variety of potent attacks with which to carry out his duties. He usually begins a combat with a terrible, hair-raising howl that causes panic in those who hear it and fail a saving throw. This panic lasts for 2d4 rounds. Cerberus’ saliva carries a deadly poison. The dog’s center head can spit a stream of poison to a range of 30 feet. A creature meeting the gaze of all three heads must make a saving throw or be turned to stone (basalt, to be precise).

Cerberus is immune to any extraordinary, spell-like, or supernatural effect or spell that would teleport him or move him from his current location. Only deities can affect him with such magic. He is immune to death effects and disintegration and takes only half damage from acid, cold, electricity and fire.

  • Cerberus: HD 20 (120 hp): AC 0 [19]; Atk 3 bites (3d6); Move 24; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 29/6100; Special: Breath weapon, howl, petrifying gaze, poisonous bite, +1 or better weapon to hit, regenerate 1d6 hit points per round, magic resistance (20%)

Source: Cerberus from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Cerebral Stalker

Cerebral stalkers are 6-foot tall bipedal creatures with blackish-gray scales covering their semi-reptilian form. A thick layer of mucus and slime drips from the creature’s body. The cerebral stalker’s bestial head sports vertical-slitted eyes of dull gray and a mouth filled with jagged teeth. Its hands are large and end in sharpened claws. A creature slain by a cerebral stalker’s bite attack has its brain ripped out and consumed. The empty husk becomes a zombie in 1d4 rounds. A cerebral stalker’s gaze instills fear (as per the spell of the same name) and three times per day, it can shoot sticky webbing from its body (as per a web spell).

  • Cerebral Stalker: HD 9: AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d6+2) or bite (1d8+2); Move 6 (Burrow 3); Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Consume brain, create zombie, fear gaze, web

Source: Cerebral Stalker from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Chain Worm

A chain worm is a massive centipede with a bright, reflective silver carapace. Its legs are dull silver and its oversized mandibles are black. A dull black stinger is located at the rear of its body. Chain worms stand nearly 6 feet tall and are about 10 feet long. By rapidly vibrating its carapace, a chain worm emits a high-pitched trilling sound that stuns and deafens all creatures within 30 feet (save resists).

  • Chain Worm: HD 12: AC 1 [18]; Atk 1 bite (2d6) and tail sting (2d6 + poison); Move 9 (Climb 6); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Poison, trilling

Source: Chain Worm from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Chalkeion (Men of Bronze)

The proud Men of Bronze are legendary for their martial prowess and ferocity. They appear as normal men (albeit unusually handsome and well proportioned normal men) with a deep reddish-brown skin tone and are typically armed and dressed in antique fashion. The chalkeions are the last remnants of a former age, and those few who remain make their living as mercenaries, for they crave battle above all things. Their flesh is not literally bronze, but it is exceptionally tough, giving them a natural armor class of 5[14]. In battle, they usually wear leather armor and shields (which improves their AC to 2[17]), carry spears and javelins, and do not typically ride horses. In melee chalkeions function as berserkers, gaining 2 attacks per round and never needing to check morale. Because of their fearlessness and strict discipline they are highly sought after as mercenaries, but it is also well known that the men of bronze place loyalty to their brethren and self preservation above their employers’ interests and will not obey orders which they perceive as foolish or suicidal. For every 6 men of bronze encountered there will typically be a sergeant with 6 hit dice, for every 12 a lieutenant with 7 or 8 hit dice, and groups of 30 or more are typically led by a captain with 10-12 hit dice. (Author: Trent Foster).

  • Man of Bronze (hoplite): HD 5; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 by weapon (1d6); Move 12; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: None.
  • Man of Bronze (sergeant): HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 by weapon (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: None.
  • Man of Bronze (lieutenant): HD 7; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 by weapon (1d6); Move 12; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: None.
  • Man of Bronze (captain): HD 11; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 by weapon (1d6); Move 12; Save 4; AL N; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Chaos Knight

The Chaos Knight appears to be a faintly glowing, ghostly suit of animated armor. It seems insubstantial, but has a definite physical presence. There are no features to be discerned within its helm, save for a dim blue glow. Intense cold radiates from the Chaos Knight; any fire within 20ft will be dampened or doused, and liquids will cool and turn to ice.

The mere touch of a Chaos Knight is freezing cold, chilling those it touches to the bone. It wields a sword in melee, drawing upon otherworldly might to inflict extra damage

By concentrating for one round, a Chaos Knight may pass through solid objects such as a wall, leaving an icy outline where it has done so (3/day). It can cast Wall of Ice (3/day), cause shafts of ice to erupt from the ground (3/day), and open a portal similar to a Dimension Door spell (3/day). The portal remains open for up to 10 rounds, and anyone looking at it will see a kaleidoscopic passage of jagged energy bolts and whirling, ever-changing elemental matter. Any being other than the Chaos Knight that passes through the portal suffers 10 points of damage per round. The Chaos Knight may pass back and forth between the two end-points of the portal at will. It may also use Telekinesis once per day, and invoke a random spell effect twice per day.The Chaos Knight is immune to mind-affecting magic, as well as attacks from non-magical weapons. Normal weapons with a Bless spell cast upon them can hit and damage a chaos knight. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”).

  • Chaos Knight: HD 10; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 touch (1d6), or sword (1d8+8); Move 12 (Fly 4); Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 14/2600; Special: Special dimension door, wall of ice, spikes of ice, pass through walls, telekinesis, random spell effect, immune to non-magical weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Cherum

This hairless mountain of slick raw burning flesh constantly sizzles and oozes with the stench of burning fat. Two long meaty arms sprout from a hugely obese frame; its head appears to be little more than a bald sloping brow with black pits for eyes. Its maw splits open to reveal cavernous jaws, teeth glowing like huge red hot coals. A cherum stands about 70 feet tall and weighs well over 40,000 pounds. Anyone within 40 feet of a cherum takes 6d6 points of fire damage each round (save for half) from the blazing heat radiating off the creature’s body. If a cherum rolls a natural 20 on its bite attack, it swallows an opponent whole and does an automatic 4d6 points of damage each round to the creature. Cherum’s heal 5 hit points per round while touching flame or lava.

  • Cherum: HD 24: AC -3 [22]; Atk 2 claws (2d8 + 1d6 fire) and bite (4d6 + 1d6 fire); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 27/6500; Special: Fiery aura, swallow whole, regenerate 5 hp/round, immune to fire and poison, vulnerable to cold, spell resistance (30%)

Source: Cherum from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Chimera

The chimera has three heads; one is the head of a goat, one the head of a lion, and one the head of a dragon. Great wings rise from its lion-like body. The dragon head can breathe fire (3 times per day) with a range of 50ft, causing 3d8 damage to anyone caught within the fiery blast (saving throw for half damage).

  • Chimera: HD 9; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 2 goat horns (1d4), 1 lion bite (2d4), dragon bite (3d4); Move 9 (Fly 18); Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Breathes fire.

Source: Monstrosities

Chrystone

Chrystones are humanoid creatures made of rock and crystal that normally stand just over 5 feet tall. Their coloration varies by the types of crystal and rock they absorb, giving each chrystone a unique pattern of striations and coloration that makes them easy to tell apart. Originally imbued with life by a spellcaster in a ritual involving the blood of several dragons and a demon, chrystones grow new offspring through budding. To form a new bud, a chrystone must consume several times its weight in crystals and consume at least 300 gp worth of gems. The bud continues to grow from the chrystone’s back until it is large enough to separate. Each chrystone offspring retains the memories and knowledge of its entire parental line.

In battle, a chrystone can exhale a 20-foot cone of rainbow colors up to three times per day. Creatures with 2 HD or less are blinded and knocked unconscious for 2d4 rounds and remain blinded for an additional 1d4 rounds after regaining consciousness. Creatures with 3 or more HD are blinded for 1d4 rounds. Sightless creatures are not affected by the chrystone’s breath weapon.

Chrystones can use the stone shape spell at will and the stone tell spell twice per day. They are immune to all spells save transmute rock to mud, which slows them for 2d6 rounds, transmute mud to rock, which restores all lost hit points to them, stone shape, which acts as a cure light wounds spell, and stone to flesh, which does not turn them into flesh, but does negate their immunity to magic for 1 round.

Whenever a character strikes a chrystone with a weapon (magical or nonmagical), the wielder must succeed on a saving throw or shatter into pieces. A magic weapon adds its own bonus to the saving throw. If the weapon breaks, the chrystone takes no damage from the attack.

When a chrystone is destroyed, it shatters, spraying razor-sharp fragments from its form. Creatures within 5 feet of the chrystone take 2d6 points of damage. A saving throw halves the damage.

  • Chrystone: HD 5: AC 4 [15]; Atk Longsword (1d8); Move 9; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Breath weapon, spells, immune to magic, resistance to non-magical weapons (50%), shatter weapons

Source: Chrystone from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Patrick Lawinger.

Chupacabra

The chupacabra is a fur-covered bipedal creature is 3 or 4 feet tall with a hunched back, red eyes, and a mouth filled with sharpened teeth. A flexible rows of spines run down its back. Chupacabras are small terrifying bloodsuckers that lurk on the fringes of society, emerging at night to drain the blood of warm-blooded creatures. If a chupacabra hits a single opponent with both claws, it latches on and begins sucking the creatures blood with an automatic bite attack that does 1d4 points of damage each round thereafter. There is a 10% chance that any chupacabra encountered has wings (Fly 15).

  • Chupacabra: HD 3: AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d3) and bite (1d4); Move 9; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Drain Blood

Source: Chupacabra from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Church Grim

Church grims are good sprits that guard cemeteries from those who seek to steal from the dead, or those who wish to desecrate the sanctity of the graves there. They appear as large black dogs, roving protectively among the tombstones at night. The eyes of a church grim see all evil that crosses into its territory, and it spares no mercy for such trespassers. The howl of a church grim causes any Chaotic creature to save or flee in terror for 2d4 rounds (save resists). Church grims are partly incorporeal, requiring +1 or better weapons to hit. A church grim that is destroyed reforms in 24 hours. Animate dead or similar spells to create undead fizzle when a church grim is around as the creature defends the dead souls under its protection.

  • Church Grim: HD 5: AC 7 [12]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 15; Save 12; AL L; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Howl, +1 or better weapons to hit, soul defender

Source: Church Grim from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Churr

Churrs are savage ape-like creatures found in heavily forested areas. They are fairly intelligent, standing 8 feet tall and weighing about 800 pounds. If a churr hits a single opponent with both claws, it grabs the foe and constricts for an additional 1d6 points of damage. A churr can unleash a frightening howl that causes all creatures within 60 feet to flee in fear (as per a fear spell) if they fail a save.

  • Churr: HD 6: AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6) and bite (1d6); Move 9 (Climb 6); Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Constrict, howl

Source: Churr from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Clam, Giant

Giant clams are generally found in coastal waters no deeper than 60 feet from the surface of the water. Many species of giant clams subsist strictly on a diet of sunlight, and as such are never found in deeper waters where sunlight cannot reach. Such giant clams are generally found in shallow seas or attached to coral reefs near the surface. Other species of giant clams feed not only on sunlight but also on what they can filter from the water, usually small plants and animals, and sometimes the occasional swimmer. A giant clam moves by pushing out a small “foot” and sliding itself along. Victims of the giant clam’s bite attack must pass a saving throw or be swallowed. The giant clam uses a slow-acting acid to break down its meals, inflicting 1d2 points of damage each round. Victims lodged inside the creature can escape with a successful strength check. Otherwise, it opens on its own in 1d4 hours.

  • Giant Clam: HD 4: AC 5 [14]; Atk Bite (swallow); Move 3; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Acid, surprise on 1-3 on 1d6
Giant Clam from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Clamor

A clamor is a strange, extraplanar creature composed entirely of sound waves. Normally invisible, a clamor looks like a field of shifting patterns of vibrations and oscillations approximately 5 feet across and about as tall. Clamors can perfectly mimic any sound they encounter. Clamors tend to avoid combat, instead staying back and “playing back” any sound they hear. If attacked, the clamor blasts opponents with a high frequency sonic beam. If overwhelmed, it uses its sonic burst to escape. This burst of sound can be heard for miles. Any creature within 100 feet of the clamor must save or be stunned for 1d3 rounds. Anyone within 50 feet must save or be permanently deafened. If attacked, the clamor focuses its sonic ray on the opponent.

  • Clamor: HD 4: AC 3 [16]; Atk sonic ray (2d6); Move (Fly 24); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Sonic burst, mimic, +2 magic weapons to hit, invisibility

Source: Clamor from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Clawed Fiend

Clawed fiends are 5-ft. tall, pale green humanoids. Their legs are short stumps and their hairless facial features carry a distinctive frog-like cast (large, bulbous eyes, wide mouth). This creature is so named because of its absurdly long arms which end in long, viciously sharp claws. The arms themselves extend to 5-ft, with the claws reaching 2 to 3 feet. With such a long range, the clawed fiend isn’t limited to attacking foes directly in front of it, but may also attack those up to 8ft away. Although clawed fiends can inflict devastating damage on their foes by way of their vicious claws, they are slow critters, and are penalized with a -1 to initiative rolls. Without the digits required for fine manipulation, clawed fiends are unable to employ weapons of any kind. (Author Skathros)

  • Clawed Fiend: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d8/1d8); Move 3; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: -1 to initiative.

Source: Monstrosities

Cliessid

The amphibious Cliessid are small, shelled humanoids with pincers in place of hands, three thick toes on each leg in a Y-shape, and a mass of writhing tentacles in place of a head. They stand no taller than a man’s knee. Cliessids live in sluggish rivers, shallow streams, stagnant ponds, and sewer systems, and can move as fast in, or under, the water as on land. Some cities have imported and domesticated these creatures for use in sewer maintenance, but with mixed results, for cliessids are viciously hostile to any who invade their territory. (Auhtor: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”).

  • Cliessid: HD 1d4hp; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 pincers (1hp); Move 9 (Swim 9); Save 18; AL N; CL/XP A/5; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Cloaker

Cloakers are manta-like creatures that resemble a large black cloak – the ivory claws are often even mistaken for a clasp of some kind, as they are kept folded when the cloaker is at rest. Unfurled, the cloaker has a span of about eight feet.

Cloakers can attempt to enfurl their opponents during melee combat, while attacking. If the cloaker hits with its attempt to enfold a target, the victim is clasped in the cloaker’s manta-like body (a saving throw allows the victim to escape). The victim is allowed no further saving throws to escape, although it is possible to attack the cloaker with a dagger from within its folds. The cloaker can bite an enfolded opponent with a +4 bonus to hit.

Perhaps more dangerous than the cloaker’s ability to enfold an opponent is its ability to moan, for the cloaker’s moaning is dire indeed, causing a petrifying fear. Anyone hearing the moan of a cloaker must make a saving throw or do one of two things (50% chance of each): either flee at top speed for 1d6 turns, or be immobilized with fear for 1 turn.

Finally, cloakers have the ability to manipulate darkness and shadows. They can cause darkness 15-ft. radius whenever desired, and as long as shadows or darkness are present, they can create shadowy mirror images of themselves (as per the spell) once per day (1d4 images).

  • Cloaker: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk Tail (1d8), bite (1d6), enfurl; Move 9 (Fly 12); Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Moan, mirror image, darkness, enfurl.

Source: Monstrosities

Clockworks

Clockworks are the creations of powerful machines called brain gears. Each clockwork creature varies from its brethren and each is assigned a task by the brain gear that created it. Clockworks are automatons and follow orders without question. It is through these various clockwork creations that brain gears seek to destroy all living creatures. They come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes.

The clockwork creations controlled by a brain gear share several characteristics. Most constructs are immediately destroyed when reduced to 0 hit points. Clockworks with the self-repair special quality, however, are not destroyed at 0 or less hit points. While they do cease to function, they continue to self-repair, only at a slower rate. Once it has self-repaired itself to at least 1 hit point, the clockwork begins functioning normally again.

Some clockworks (see below) can automatically repair themselves with spare parts and scrap, and a built-in mechanism allows them to self-repair even when seemingly destroyed. The clockwork automatically heals damage at a fixed rate per round, as given in the clockwork’s entry. Certain attack forms, typically acid, cold, and fire cannot be self-repaired. The clockwork’s descriptive text describes the details.

A clockwork with self-repair can repair lost limbs (including its head), but it takes 3d6 rounds to do so. A clockwork reduced to 0 or less hit points is not destroyed, but begins to self-repair damage at one-half its normal rate (minimum 1 hit point per round). It still cannot repair damage dealt by acid, cold, or fire effects. For example, a clockwork with self-repair 3 normally regains 3 hit points per round. If reduced to 0 or less hit points, it regains 1 hit point per round until it has at least 1 hit point (at which time it self-repairs at its normal rate).

Clockwork — Brain Gear

The original brain gear began as little more than a collection of gears, chains, counterweights, and levers, but was enhanced and grown into a controlling intellect through a process very similar to flesh golem creation. A brain gear in its true form resembles nothing more than a copper or gold box or cube that shines with a pale blue light. It is immobile, cannot attack, or speak. The casing of a brain gear is so hard that it ignores up to 5 points of damage from physical attacks.

A brain gear is designed to control the actions of all other clockworks created by its own creator, relieving the creator of having to oversee simple operations of the clockworks. It is rumored that some brain gears occasionally develop an evil intellect and turn their charges against its creator. Any clockwork that comes within two miles of a brain gear immediately falls under that brain gear’s control. If more than one brain gear attempts to control a clockwork (or if the clockwork is under the control of another brain gear or overseer), each gear must make a saving throw; the brain gear beating its saving throw by the most gains control of that clockwork.

When a clockwork moves more than 2 miles away from a brain gear, it continues to perform the last order given to it, but there is a 25% percent chance each hour that it ceases to function, collapsing into a pile of junk. If a brain gear later moves within two miles of the destroyed clockwork, the clockwork can reactivate if it has the self-repair ability. Otherwise, it remains destroyed.

A brain gear in control of at least one clockwork can use that clockwork to perceive the world through its senses. This ability has a range of 2 miles. A brain gear can switch control from one clockwork to another once per round. A brain gear uses this ability to give commands to its clockworks, allowing the usually mindless creatures to fight with highly coordinated tactics. Each clockwork is capable of receiving roughly 100 words worth of orders. Anything beyond that is too complicated for the clockwork to handle.

The brain gear has a limited ability to send psychic messages to multiple creatures of a particular type (human, ogre, etc) through their dreams.

The secrets of clockwork construction are known only to the brain gear and to those it employs.

  • Clockwork – Brain Gear: HD: 5; AC 2 [17]; Atk None; Move 0; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Control clockworks, dream

Clockwork Drone

Clockwork drones appear as human eyeballs encased within flat, metal disks. Imbued with magic that allows it to fly, a drone’s approach is announced by a low buzzing sound caused by its tiny gears and pistons working furiously to maintain this magical field. These clockworks are designed to act as observers. When a drone finds an advantageous position from which to maintain its watch, it uses a small, metallic claw on its underside to attach itself to a surface. Drones usually avoid combat at all costs. When they are pressed into fighting, they prefer to aid their fellow clockworks by distracting their enemies.

  • Clockwork Drone: HD: 1d6; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (1d3); Move 9 (Fly 24); Save 18; AL N; CL/XP B/10; Special: None

Clockwork Overseer

Overseers are a recent invention of the brain gears. They look like three-foot tall wooden dolls with long, slender limbs. An overseer can journey up to 10 miles away from a brain gear while maintaining contact with it. An overseer acts as a field commander for brain gears, controlling up to 20 HD worth of clockworks that are within 100 feet of its position so long as the overseer remains within 10 miles of the brain gear. An overseer avoids direct combat at all costs under direct orders of a brain gear. If cornered with no way of escaping, an overseer fights, and attempts to flee as soon as possible.

  • Clockwork Overseer: HD: 2; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (1d6); Move 15; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None

Clockwork Parasite

Clockwork parasites are fist-sized constructs that resemble mechanical beetles. They burrow into the skulls of the recently dead and reanimate the body using electrical impulses to control and direct the corpse. The animated corpses look and fight like zombies, though they cannot be turned or controlled. A host brought to 0 or less hit points is destroyed, but can be repaired by the clockwork parasite using its self-repair ability (though this only works if the host is brought to 0 or less hit points; a host does not gain the self-repair ability of the parasite while “alive”). A clockwork parasite regains 3 hit points per round. Damage dealt from acid, cold, or fire effects cannot be self-repaired. If reduced to 0 or less hit points, it regains 1 hit point per round (but still cannot repair damage caused by acid, cold, or fire effects) until it has at least 1 hit point (at which time it begins to self-repair at its normal rate of 3 hit points per round).

  • Clockwork Parasite: HD: 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk Bite (1d4); Move 9; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Control host, self-repair

Clockwork Scout

Scouts are constructed to resemble animals commonly found in the area that the brain gear operates within. Their inner wood and metal workings are covered by an animal’s pelt. Characters have only a 1 in 6 chance to notice the deception (2 in 6 for demi-humans and 3 in 6 for druids and rangers). This camouflage helps them move about unnoticed and gives them the opportunity to strike from ambush. They are designed to serve as the mobile eyes and ears of a clockwork colony. While still restricted by the 2-mile radius they must remain within to keep contact with a brain gear, scouts serve an important role as reconnaissance, patrol, and pursuit troops. Only if the scouts have a chance to strike from a devastating ambush does the brain gear order them into battle.

  • Clockwork Scout: HD: 1; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (1d4); Move 15; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None

Clockwork Swarm

Clockwork swarms are a collection of tiny, insect-like clockworks that work together as a single creature. An individual member of the swarm poses little threat. Yet when acting in concert, a swarm poses a deadly threat to adventurers. Much like the clockwork warrior, the clockwork swarm forms a fighting frame from random pieces of trash, debris, and other cast-offs. The swarm, however, is much more capable of adapting to new situations and surviving combat. Unless the individual components of the swarm are destroyed, it simply reforms and continues its attack. Area of effect attacks, such as burning oil, fireball, or lightning bolt are the most effective means of destroying the swarm. A clockwork swarm typically appears as a ramshackle collection of spare parts and garbage draped in a thick, web-like substance and arranged in a vaguely humanoid form. Living creatures engulfed by the clockwork swarm must pass a saving throw or be unable to act during that round.

A clockwork swarm regains 3 hit points per round. Damage dealt from acid, cold, or fire effects cannot be self-repaired. If a clockwork swarm takes damage from an area attack, it is unable to repair itself for 1d6 rounds following the attack. If reduced to 0 or less hit points, it regains 1 hit point per round (but still cannot repair damage caused by acid, cold, or fire effects) until it has at least 1 hit point (at which time it begins to self-repair at its normal rate of 3 hit points per round).

  • Clockwork Swarm: HD: 4; AC 2 [17]; Atk Swarm (1d6); Move 15; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Distraction, minimum damage from slashing and piercing weapons, self-repair

Clockwork Titan

Clockwork titans are huge, crab-like mechanical monstrosities. They have saucer-shaped hulls set atop four spindly legs that allow it to move with surprising speed and agility. Two iron-shod fists are mounted on the front of the hull. The clockwork titan has a long reach, and can attack from behind a line of clockwork warriors.

  • Clockwork Titan: HD: 7; AC 0 [19]; Atk Slam (2d8); Move 12; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: None

Clockwork Warrior

Clockwork warriors are constructed from a wide range of materials but take the same general form of a 6-foot tall armored humanoid. They all feature a “nervous system” of thin steel wires that controls their individual pieces. Tiny clockworks that look much like metallic cockroaches infest the warrior, working to repair damage sustained by this construct. These tiny clockworks repair 1 hit point per round. Acid, fire, and cold effects destroy these maintenance clockworks, thus preventing the warrior from repairing damage from those sources. Unlike clockwork swarms (see below), the clockworks that repair the warrior lack the intelligence and sophistication to tackle any other task.

  • Clockwork Titan: HD: 3; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (1d8); Move 9; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Self-repair
Clockworks from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Mike Mearls and Scott Greene.

Clockwork Bronze Giant

A clockwork bronze giant is a massive automaton standing 25 feet tall constructed entirely of bronze. Other clockwork giants are rumored to be crafted of iron, steel, bronze or other metals. Clockworks giants have no mind of their own and follow commands and orders given by their creator. Lightning heals a 3 hit points per level of the spell cast at a clockwork bronze giant. They are immune to all other spells.

  • Clockwork Bronze Giant: HD 14: AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 Weapon (4d6 plus poison) or 1 fist (2d8); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 16/3200; Special: magic resistance (25%), +1 magic weapon needed to hit, throw rocks (2d8), lightning heals, immune to most spells

Source: Clockwork Bronze Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Clubnek

A clubnek is a large flightless bird resembling a green ostrich with an oversized beak that it uses to pound and bite. Found roaming meadowlands and forests, it is primarily a herbivore subsisting on a diet of plants and flowers, though it is given to flights of unpredictability when it takes the role of hunter and predator. A clubnek stands 7 feet tall and weighs about 350 pounds. Clubneks are generally nonaggressive unless threatened or frightened, though they are known to occasionally have fits of erratic behavior that cause them to become quite aggressive. In such a case, they attack until slain or driven off. If its prey attempts to flee, the clubnek often runs it down and continues combat. Once every 5 rounds, a clubnek can move five times its normal speed when it makes a charge.

  • Clubnek: HD 2: AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d4) and beak (1d6); Move 15; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Burst of speed

Source: Clubnek from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by M. English.

Cobra Flower

Cobra flowers are tall, slender plants with large, flowering bulbs and brownish-green roots. Two large, green leaves flank its flowering top, giving the appearance of a cobra’s hood. Its leaves are thin and have transparent blotches on them. Cobra flowers draw nutrients from sunlight, the soil, and water, but enjoy a diet of insects, rodents, animals, and even humans and demi-humans when available. The creatures can be found nesting in forests and often take up residence near small population areas where they can feed on humanoids who wander into their area. Many a child’s or adult’s disappearance can be attributed to a cobra flower. When a cobra flower detects a living creature, it remains motionless until its prey is within 5 feet. It then spreads its leafy hood, opens its flowery bulb, and bites its prey, secreting acidic enzymes to break down and digest the victim. Cobra flowers can also wrap their thick stems around an opponent with a successful attack, holding their prey still, squeezing them for 1d8 points of damage per round and increasing their chance to hit with their bite attack by +2.

  • Cobra Flower: HD 6: AC 5 [14]; Atk Bite (1d8 + 1d6 acid); Move 3; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Squeeze

Source: Cobra Flower from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Cockatrice

A cockatrice resembles a bat-winged rooster with a long, serpentine tail. Its bite turns enemies to stone unless a successful saving throw is made.

  • Cockatrice: HD 5; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d6 + turn to stone); Move 6 (Fly 18); Save 12; CL/XP 8/800; Special: bite turns to stone.

Source: Monstrosities

Coffer Corpse

The coffer corpse is an undead creature formed as the result of an incomplete death ritual. It looks like a desiccated corpse shrouded in rotting, tattered funerary clothes. It is often found haunting stranded funeral barges or in other situations where a corpse has not been delivered to its final resting place. The creature hates life and attacks living creatures on sight. In combat, coffer corpses attempt to grasp their opponents around the throat, strangling them for 1d6 damage per round. A creature in the coffer corpse’s death grip cannot cast spells and can only break free by rolling an open doors check on a d8. Coffer corpses can only be harmed by magic weapons, and suffer minimal damage from edged and piercing weapons. Any time an attack is successful, regardless of the weapon used, damage dice should be rolled. If apparent (or real, in the case of magical bludgeoning damage) is 6 or higher, the coffer corpse appears to fall to the ground, destroyed. If the horror had a victim in its death grip, it will release its hold and then fall to the ground. On its next turn, however, it will rise again as if reanimated. A creature viewing this apparent reanimation must make a saving throw or become panicked for 2d4 rounds.

  • Coffer Corpse: HD 2: AC 5 [14]; Atk Slam (1d6); Move 9; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Death grip, weapon resistance, deceiving death, cause fear

Source: Coffer Corpse from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God

Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Simon Eaton.

Colossus, Jade

Jade colossi are massive constructs standing 35 feet tall and weighing about 60,000 pounds. It appears as a massive humanoid carved of smooth green stone. Its body is made up of perfect angles and contours. A jade colossus pummels a foe with its hardened fists. Once every 1d4 rounds, a jade colossus can spray a blast of green energy in a 60-foot cone or 120-foot line that does 15d6 points of damage (save for half). A creature slain by this blast is transformed into jade. Disintegrate slows a jade colossus for 1d6 rounds, while fire heals the construct. It is immune to all other magic.

  • Colossus, Jade: HD 30: AC -6 [25]; Atk 2 slams (4d8); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 36/9200; Special: Breath weapon, +3 weapons to hit, immune to fire, immune to magic

Source: Colossus, Jade from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene and Casey Christofferson.

Cooshee

Cooshees are large, 200-pound, 4-foot tall hounds with green and brown spotted fur, a long, curling tail and ears that taper to points. They are known throughout the world as elven dogs, for their features resemble those of elves and they are often found in the employ of elves (who use them as guards). Though they only bark to warn their masters or other cooshees, the bark can be heard clearly up to one mile away. Cooshees enjoy a +2 bonus to save vs. charm effects. Once per hour, they can sprint at 10 times their normal speed. The victim of a cooshee’s bite attack must pass a saving throw or be knocked prone.

  • Cooshee: HD 3: AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d4) and bite (1d8); Move 15; Save 14 (12 vs. charm); AL N (L tendencies); CL/XP 4/120; Special: Sprint, trip, surprise on 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Cooshee from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Coral Clamper

This mollusk resembles a growth of rock or coral covered with several large (but still normal-looking) clams. When a swimmer nears it, however, the clamper lashes out with long, flexible arms of muscle for which the “clams” are the tips. These appendages encircle and crush prey, with the clam-like tip serving as a viciously biting mouth. A coral clamper normally has four appendages, and these grow to a length of 20ft. The clamper’s body is protected by its hard, coral-like shell. If one of the appendages scores a hit, the victim must make a saving throw or be held helpless by the tentacle-like grasp. The clam-mouth at the end of the tentacle can attack while a victim is held, but cannot generally reach a victim other than the one held in the muscle-tentacle. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Coral Clamper: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk 4 muscle-tentacles (1d6 + grab); Move 1; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Grab victims.

Source: Monstrosities

Corpse Candle

A corpse candle appears as a translucent image of its living self. Its body shows little, if any, signs of death. Corpse candles can create dancing, twisting patterns of light that lure victims toward the colorful aura. A creature must save or be drawn onward – often into danger such as over cliffs, through fire or worse.

  • Corpse Candle: HD 6: AC 8 [11]; Atk Incorporeal touch (1d6); Move 6 (Fly 18); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Hypnotic Lights

Source: Corpse Candle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Corpse Orgy

A corpse orgy is a large, undulating mass of rotting corpses, sinew, bones, blood, muscle, mucus, and organs. It resembles an ooze and has no discernible features (other than the corpse parts that make up its form). A corpse orgy can absorb the physical body of any creature it has reduced to 0 hit points by moving over it and remaining in contact with it for at least one full round. When it absorbs a body, the corpse orgy gains 12 temporary hit points. A creature whose body is absorbed can only be raised or resurrected if the corpse orgy that absorbed its body is slain and the corpse in question is recovered. Twice per day, a corpse orgy can unleash a piercing shriek from the various heads captured in its form that deals 8d6 points of damage to all creatures within a 40-foot radius (save for half).

  • Corpse Orgy: HD 14: AC 2 [17]; Atk 4 slams (2d6); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 16/3200; Special: Absorb body, pain shriek, half damage from blunt weapons

Source: Corpse Orgy from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Corpse Rook

Corpse rooks resemble large three-headed ravens or crows. Their feathers are oily black in color and have a pungent, almost sulfuric, odor. Their beak and talons are bright silver and their eyes are golden. The creature’s wings are tipped with silver and the wingspan measures about 30 feet. From head to tail, the corpse rook is about 12 feet long. A corpse rook that hits with two or more bites on a single opponent latches on and tears at the victim’s flesh for an additional 2d8 points of damage.

  • Corpse Rook: HD 6: AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d6) and 3 bites (1d8); Move 6 (Fly 24); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Rend

Source: Corpse Rook from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Corpse Tree

These stunted, gnarled trees look like worn down, time ravaged tree trunks ranging in height from 4 to 8 feet tall, with a corpse-like shape, arms stretched forth, budding from the trunk. Every corpse tree has a tree ghost (see below) that is part of it. Corpse trees are created when a vampire or wraith kills a dryad; the dryad’s tree becomes the corpse tree and the dryad herself becomes a tree ghost. At the base of the tree is an opening leading to a strange chamber beneath, where the corpse tree’s victims are slowly digested. The “rising corpse” part of the tree animates to keep anyone but the tree ghost and her victims from entering the tree’s chamber. A corpse tree can only harmed by magic and silver weapons. Magic fire will affect the tree but ice, electricity, and acid will have no effect, nor will normal fire. The tree ghost instantly knows of any harm coming to the corpse tree, and she can teleport to the tree to defend it against harm. If either the corpse tree or the tree ghost dies, the other will die as well.

(Auhtor: Sean “Stonegiant” Stone).
  • Corpse Tree: HD 5 + 2 hp; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 fists (1d8); Move 0; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: If both fists hit the victim is “bear” hugged for an additional 2d6 damage; immune to to non-magical weapons, ice, electricity, acid, and normal fires.

Source: Monstrosities

Corpsespinner

A corpsespinner is a huge tarantula-like creature, bone white in color with bands of gray, black, or silver ringing its abdomen and legs. The average corpsespinner is 15 feet long. Its body is covered in short, bristly hairs of white or silver. The corpsespinner has a skull-like marking on its thorax. Its eight eyes are silver, white, or gray. Creatures killed by a corpsespinner rise in 1 hour as corpsespun zombies. A corpsespinner’s bite delivers a toxic poison, and they can fire sticky strands of webbing up to 80 feet up to 10 times per day (otherwise similar to a web spell)

  • Corpse Rook: HD 12: AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite (2d8 + poison); Move 9 (Climb 6); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Create corpsespun zombie, poison, web

Source: Corpse Rook from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Couatl

Intelligent serpents with feathered wings, couatls can be fifteen feet long or more. They can polymorph themselves, constrict victims for 1d6 hit points, and cast spells (3 level 1, 2 level 2, 1 level 3). Generally tropical, some may be servitors of the gods.

  • Couatl: HD 8; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (2d6 + poison), 1 tail (1d6 constrict); Move 12 (Fly 24); Save 8; AL L; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Fly, poison (lethal), spells, polymorph.

Source: Monstrosities

Crab, Giant

Larger specimens of giant crabs might move more slowly – these stats are for a crab about 5-ft. in diameter.

  • Giant Crab: HD 3; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 pincers (1d6+2); Move 9; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Crab, Monstrous

Monstrous crabs are omnivores and spend most of their time combing the ocean floors for food. Many act as vegetarians and sustain themselves on a diet of algae, fungus, and water-based plants, while others act as scavengers or predators. Some have been known to actively hunt giant clams and snails (the monstrous crab pries the shell open and devours the fleshy innards). Still others prefer to dwell in coastal waters and prey upon land-based creatures that wander too close to the shoreline. Monstrous crabs are often hunted as food by other races (particularly humans and sahuagin). They are about the size of a panther.

  • Monstrous Crab: HD 3: AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4); Move 12(Swim 9); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None

Source: Monstrous Crab from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Crab Man

Crab men are bipedal creatures with a crab-like exoskeleton and a pincer at the end of each arm. They are tribal creatures, found living near water (including subterranean lakes and rivers).

  • Crab men: HD 2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d4); Save 16; Move 9 (swim 9); AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Crabman

This giant-sized creature is a bipedal humanoid with a crab-like head, large hands that end in powerful pincers, feet that are splayed. It is covered with chitinous plates, reddish-brown in color. Two smaller humanoid arms protrude below its pincers. Crabmen inhabit coastal waters, hunting fish and gathering food. Crabmen communicate with others of their race through a series of hisses and clicks. A typical crabman stands about 9 feet tall. They speak their own language, and more intelligent examples of their species often speak Common. Crabmen are passive and peaceful creatures, rarely engaging in combat. Crabmen attack with their claws; their pincers prevent them from wielding weapons. Their humanoid arms end in human-like hands and are used for fine dexterity and manipulation; they are too weak to wield weapons effectively. Crabmen can survive indefinitely on land and under water. Crabmen make their homes in sea caves and coastal cliffs. Most tribes are led by male or female elders.

Crabmen as Characters

Crabmen are rather hulking brutes, despite their passive dispositions. They begin the game with an extra hit dice and are capable of swimming at a speed of 9. Their chitinous exoskeletons provide an AC of 3 [16], which is convenient since crabmen are incable of wearing armor or using shields. Their pincer attacks do 1d6 points of damage – again, this is convenient since they are incapable of using weapons, their second set of humanoid arms being too frail for such heavy work.

Crabmen may be fighters, advancing to the 4th level of ability (5th level with Strength of 17, 6th level with Strength of 18). Rare crabmen with prime requisites of 16 or higher can take up the profession of druid or magic-user, advancing to a maximum of 3rd level.

  • Crabman: HD 3: AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 12 (Swim 9); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None

Source: Crabman from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Erica Balsley, based on original material by Ian Livingstone

Crabnipede

Crabnipedes are horrible sea creatures resembling man-sized centipedes with 4 pincers. They hunt on sea floors and lake bottoms, and can crawl out from the water for hours, if the hunting seems better on land. The crabnipede’s bite is mildly poisonous, causing paralysis for 1d6 turns (saving throw applies). (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Crabnipede: HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk 4 claws (1d4), 1 bite (1d6 + paralysis); Move 6 (Swim 12); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Paralysis poison (1d6 turns).

Source: Monstrosities

Crag Man

Sometimes called living stalagmites, crag men appear as a normal stalagmite. In humanoid form, a crag man is a 6-foot tall human-shaped creature seemingly carved from stone. It is thick and squat and its features are jagged and broken. Small depressions on its head function as eyes, though no pupils are present. The crag man has no ears. A ridge on its “face” running between its eyes serves as a nose and its mouth is a wide, toothless crevice. Its arms end in powerful fists and its legs end in humanoid feet. A crag man’s hands end in stony points that pierce an opponent’s skin with each slam. Once a day, a crag man can summon 2d10 piercers with a 50% chance of success. A crag man can employ passwall (as per the spell) once per day.

  • Crag Man: HD 6: AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 piercing slams (1d8+2); Move 6; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Pierce, piercer hellstorm, passwall

Source: Crag Man from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Crayfish, Monstrous

Giant crayfish are freshwater creatures that dwell on the bottom of seas, lakes, ponds, and other shallow waters. They are predators and scavengers and exist on a diet of decaying flesh (dead fish and other water-based animals), algae, snails, worms, and other animals (including swimmers who come to close to their lair). Giant crayfish make their homes under rocks or in underwater tunnels burrowed out by the crayfish. Most underwater tunnels extend over long distances and include a “chimney” found along the edge of the water or even as far as 100 feet away from the water which allows the giant crayfish to enter and exit its passageways onto dry ground. A giant crayfish can survive out of the water for up to 7 hours before suffocating.

  • Monstrous Crayfish: HD 4: AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 9 (Swim 15); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP4/120; Special: Surprise on 1-2 on 1d6

Source: Monstrous Crayfish from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Crocodiles

Crocodile, Normal

Some normal crocodiles are man-eaters; all are dangerous and can conceal themselves well. Normal crocodiles can grow to be as long as 15 ft.

  • Normal Crocodile: HD 3; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 9 (Swim 12); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Crocodile, Giant

The smallest of giant crocodiles are about 20ft long (normal crocodiles can grow to be as long as 15-ft).

  • Giant Crocodile: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite (3d6), 1 tail (1d6); Move 9 (Swim 12); Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Crucifixion Spirit

A crucifixion spirit is a translucent, gaunt humanoid with injuries to each wrist and to the arch of each foot. A crucifixion spirit makes no noise and its face is twisted in eternal pain. Its eyes flicker red. The incorporeal touch of a crucifixion spirit causes paralysis (save avoids). Five times per day, the spirit can point at a single target and crucify its soul if it hits its target. If the target fails a save, his body collapses as his soul is ripped out of his body and crucified to an X-shaped structure with translucent spikes. The victim is not dead, but loses 2 levels per round unless he is saved. A crucified victim can return to its body by making a save, but this leaves the victim stunned for one round.

  • Crucifixion Spirit: HD 12: AC 4 [15]; Atk Incorporeal touch (1d8 + paralysis) or crucify soul; Move 9 (Fly 18); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Crucify soul, paralysis

Source: Crucifixion Spirit from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Crumbler

Crumblers are mountain and cavern-dwelling “rock men,” who serve as guardians for important things. They are immune to fire, electricity and magical “blasting” attacks. Cutting weapons inflict half damage (and there is a 2 in 6 chance of non-magical weapons breaking against them). Hammers and maces do normal damage. They usually attack in groups, rising up out of the rubble surrounding boulder-laden areas. They cannot pursue, being rooted to the earth.

(Author: Old Crawler).

  • Crumbler: HD 1; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 thrown rock (1d4) or fist (1d4); Move 0; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Immunities.

Source: Monstrosities

Crypt Thing

Crypt things are hooded and robed skeletons found sitting in high-backed chairs, its eyes appearing as small pinpoints of reddish light. They are created by spellcasters as tomb guardians. They never leave their assigned area and never initiate combat. A crypt thing is content to sit (or stand) in its assigned area so long as intruders do not disturb it or anything in the assigned area. At the first sign of disturbance however, a crypt thing springs to life. Its first order of business is to attempt to remove the interlopers from its assigned area by teleporting them 1d10 x 100 feet in a random direction (roll 1d4: 1, north; 2, south; 3, east; 4, west). The recipient of this free, unplanned trip can resist it with a saving throw. A teleported creature arrives in the closest open space at the determined destination. A teleported creature can arrive in mid-air rather than on a solid surface, if the crypt thing wishes.

Crypt Guardian

There exists in some parts of the world (and perhaps only truly in legend; sages aren’t sure) a variant of the crypt thing known as a crypt guardian. This variant has all the same abilities and powers as a normal crypt thing, with the following changes. The variant does not possess the ability to teleport others. Instead, it can simultaneously paralyze and turn invisible all creatures within 50 feet. An affected creature can make a saving throw to negate the effects. Affected creatures remain paralyzed and invisible for 2d4 days. A new save is allowed each day until the effects are broken, dispelled, or the duration ends.

Create Crypt Thing

Spell Level: Cleric and Magic-User, 7th Level Range: 60 feet Duration: Instantaneous

This spell allows you to animate a single corpse into a crypt thing. This spell must be cast in the area the creature is to guard or it fails. The corpse must be mostly intact and must be humanoid-shaped and have a skeletal system or structure. Only one crypt thing is created with this spell, and it remains in the area where it was created until destroyed. A black pearl gem worth at least 300 gp must be placed inside the mouth of the corpse. When the corpse animates, the gem is destroyed.

  • Crypt Thing: HD 6: AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Teleport other, +1 or better weapons to hit, turn as 10 HD monster

Source: Crypt Thing from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Roger Musson.

Crystal Growth

A strange fungus grown from mineral deposits, the Crystal Growth appears to be a large, multi-faceted, crystalline lump. It may be mistaken for a massive piece of quartz, as it is usually the size of a human head. Crystal growth feeds upon minerals found in the bloodstream of humans, warm-blooded humanoids, and other intelligent mammals. Despite lacking any discernible sense organs, the crystal growth can somehow sense life within 90ft, and anyone touching the crystal growth will suffer an immediate attack. The crystal growth moves by rolling on its facets, and can bounce off walls, rock faces, and other hard objects to leap a few feet into the air. When it comes into contact with bare flesh, it drains blood at the rate of 1d8 hit points per round. Due to its partly mineral structure, it is heavy and can knock creatures off their feet by rolling and leaping at them. Some crystal growths learn the tactic of dropping from above onto the head and shoulders of targets. As the target may be knocked senseless by this tactic, the crystal growth is usually able to get in a few rounds of blood drain before being interrupted by other crystal growths seeking a free meal. A battle over food between crystal growths is a strange sight, with combatants rolling and battering against each other.

Reptilian and avian creatures lack the minerals the crystal growths feed upon, and crystal growths ignore them. Canny reptilians, such as subterranean lizards and cave-dwelling lizard men, have learned to crack open a crystal growth and lick out its salty, milk-like juices. The juice of one crystal growth is sufficient nourishment for one man-sized creature for half a day, or a full day if it contains blood. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”).

  • Crystal Growth: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 blood drain (1d8); Move 9; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Blood drain.

Source: Monstrosities

Crystaline

The crystalines resemble humanoids whose entire bodies are composed of crystal. When a crystalline dies (reaches 0 hp), its body shatters in an explosion of crystal shards. All within 10ft failing their save suffer 2d6 points of damage (a successful save halves the damage).

Crystalines have learned to use their faceted crystal-like bodies in conjunction with light to temporarily blind their foes. On a failed save the victim is considered blinded and suffers a -4 penalty to hit for the next 1d4 rounds. This ability counts as an action as the crystaline must position it body to capture the light and direct it effectively against a foe. (Author: Skathros).

  • Crystaline: HD 3; AC 3 [16]; Atk Weapon (“fist”) (1d6); Move 12; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Blinding Refracted Light, Explosive Light.

Source: Monstrosities

Crystalline Horror

A crystalline horror is a weird, unnatural humanoid made entirely of crystal and glass. It is man-sized and its head sports no eyes, nose, ears, or mouth. Its body appears razor-sharp and jagged. Its hands end in wicked claws. The origins of the crystalline horror are shrouded in mystery. A crystalline horror can loose a spray of razor-sharp shards of glass from its body in a 40-foot cone. A creature in the area takes 3d6 points of damage or half that amount if it succeeds on a saving throw. The crystalline horror can launch only five such sprays in a given day. Victims of any attack from the crystalline horror must pass an additional saving throw to avoid having an artery knicked. Unfortunates who fail such a saving throw suffer an additional 1d4 points of damage each round from bleeding until the wound is tended or magically healed. In place of attacking, a crystalline horror can refract natural light into a bright light that radiates out in a 10-foot spread. Creatures within this area must succeed on a saving throw or be blinded for 3 rounds.

  • Crystalline Horror: HD 7: AC 0 [19]; Atk Shard spray (3d6) or claw (1d6); Move 12; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Shard spray, bend light, +1 or better weapons to hit, resistance to cold (50%)

Source: Crystalline Horror from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Crystallis

A crystallis is formed of quartz, earth, and crystal and stands about 13 feet tall. Its powerful arms and legs end in razor-sharp claws that glint and shine like polished steel. Its large rounded head sports two sunken crystalline eyes and a gaping toothless maw. A crystallis attacks with razor-sharp crystalline claws that cause opponents to bleed each round for 2 hit points of damage until a healing spell is cast on the creature. Once every 1d4+1 rounds, the creature can breathe a cloud of orange smoke that fills a 10-foot cube in front of the crystallis. Anyone inside this smoke must save or be turned into a crystal, gem-encrusted statue.

  • Crystallis: HD 14: AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (2d6+3); Move 6 (Burrow 6); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Crystalline claws, wounding, petrification breath

Source: Crystallis from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.