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Monster Details E through G



Monster Details E through G

Contents

E

Eagle, Giant

Giant eagles are just large enough to carry a human rider. Some varieties of the breed may be intelligent, and truly unusual specimens might even be capable of casting spells or using other magical powers. These unusual breeds of giant eagle might be aligned with Law rather than Neutrality. Because giant eagles can be tamed as mounts, their eggs and fledglings are worth considerable amounts of gold (500+gp).

  • Giant Eagle: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 talons (1d4), 1 bite (1d8); Move 3 (Fly 24); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Ear Seeker

Ear seekers are small maggot-like creatures, white or brown in color. They are found lairing in rotting wood or similar organic materials. If the check fails, the ear seekers have contacted the creature and move toward any warm place on the creature (favoring places such as the ears) in which to lay their eggs. Once an ear seeker enters a warm place, it lays 2d8 eggs before dying. In 4d6 hours, the eggs hatch and the larvae devour the surrounding flesh, dealing 2d6 points of damage to the host each round thereafter. At 0 hit points, the host dies and the ear seekers crawl out to find a new host. A cure disease spell kills all ear seekers and any unhatched eggs.

Ear Seeker from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Erica Balsley, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Eblis

The eblis are a semi-civilized society of birdmen that make their homes in desolate swamps and marshes. They rarely have interactions with other races, preferring the company of their own kind and the serenity of their marshland homes. An eblis is a large bird that strongly resembles a stork — so much so that eblis are often called “stork men.” An eblis stands about 8 feet tall, and the neck is extremely long and snake-like and is unnaturally flexible and capable of blindingly fast movements. An eblis’ beak is long, sharp, and deadly. A male eblis has gray-brown feathers with reddish patches on its head, while a female lacks the red patch. Eblis speak their own language of clicks and chatters and some speak Common. Each eblis flock has one individual capable of using arcane magic. A spellcasting eblis has 1d6 spells, each spell usable once per day. Each spell is cast as though a 4th level magic-user.

1d6 Spell
1ESP
2Mirror image
3Obscuring mist
4Phantasmal force
5Fear
6Invisibility

  • Eblis: HD 4; AC 2 [17]; Atk Beak (1d6); Move 12 (Fly 12); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Spells, fire resistance (50%)

Source: Eblis from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Ectoplasm (Ghost Ooze)

This incorporeal ooze resembles a faintly glowing, billowing cloud. Ectoplasms are not undead. The pseudopod attack of an ectoplasm imposes a -1 cumulative to-hit penalty to attack and damage with each strike. It does an additional 1 point of damage against undead.

  • Ectoplasm: HD 7; AC 10 [9]; Atk 1 pseudopod (1d8 + weakness); Move 6 (flying); Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: +1 or better magic weapon required to hit

Source: Ectoplasm from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Eel, Giant

These statistics are for giant eels about ten feet in length. Larger eels would have correspondingly greater hit dice. The electric shock generated by a giant electric eel would cause 3d6 points of damage in the surrounding water, with no saving throw. See also, “Lampreys,” which are also eels.

  • Giant Electric Eel: HD 2; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bite (1d3); Move 0 (Swim 9); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Electric shock.
  • Giant Moray Eel: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 0 (Swim 9); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Efreeti

Efreet are a type of genie, associated with fire (in contrast to the djinn, who have powers over the air). Efreet can carry up to 1000 pounds of weight, and under the right circumstances they can be forced to serve as a slave until they figure out how to free themselves. An efreeti can create a wall of fire (per the spell). They appear as giant humans with cruel features, their skin flickering with flames.

  • Efreeti: HD 10; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 fist or sword (1d8+5); Move 9 (Fly 24); Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Wall of fire.

Source: Monstrosities

Elementals

Elementals are living manifestations of the basic forms of matter: earth, air, fire, and water. They are usually summoned from their native planes of existence to do the bidding of a powerful wizard. These beings can also be “chained” within objects or structures to give the objects magical properties. Elementals are barely intelligent at all, but they are as powerful as the forces of nature that they actually are.

Air Elemental

Air elementals can turn into a whirlwind of air with a diameter of 30 ft, hurling any creature of 1 HD or less for great distances (and almost certainly killing them). These elemental whirlwinds are approximately 100 ft. in height.

  • Air Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (2d8); Move (Fly 36); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Whirlwind, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Air Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (2d8); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Whirlwind, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Air Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (2d8); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Whirlwind, immune to non-magic weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Earth Elemental

Earth elementals are hulking man-shapes of rock and earth. They batter opponents with their great fists, although damage is reduced by 1d6 if the opponent is not standing upon earth or rock. Earth elementals can tear apart stone structures, able to rip down even a castle wall in a matter of 1d4+4 rounds (minutes).

  • Earth Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (4d8); Move 6; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Tear down stonework, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Earth Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (4d8); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Tear down stonework, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Earth Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (4d8); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3400; Special: Tear down stonework, immune to non-magic weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Fire Elemental

Fire elementals are formless masses of flame, perhaps with a vaguely human shape. Their attacks cause flammable materials (including wood) to ignite if the material fails a saving throw (as determined by the Referee).

  • Fire Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (3d8); Move 12; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Ignite materials, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Fire Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (3d8); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Ignite materials, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Fire Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (3d8); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3400; Special: Ignite materials, immune to non-magic weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Gravity Elemental

Gravity elementals are circular regions of absolute blackness that attack by hurling objects using telekinesis. They warp and manipulate gravity within 20 feet of them, giving arrows and other missile attacks a -6 to-hit penalty. Spells such as magic missile ignore this warped gravity field and strike true.

  • Gravity Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (2d8); Move (Fly 36); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: telekinesis
  • Gravity Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (2d8); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: telekinesis
  • Gravity Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (2d8); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: telekinesis

Gravity Elemental from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Negative Energy Elemental

A negative energy elemental appears as a sphere of translucent gray energy with small motes of light winking in and out of existence. The touch of a negative energy elemental drains 1 level with each hit. When slain, a negative energy elemental detonates in a 30-foot-radius blast that deals 1d6 points of damage per 2 HD.

  • Negative Energy Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (1d8 + energy drain); Move (Fly 36); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Level drain (1 level with hit)
  • Negative Energy Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (1d8 + energy drain); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Level drain (1 level with hit)
  • Negative Energy Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (1d8 + energy drain); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Level drain (1 level with hit)

Source: Negative Energy Elemental from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Positive Energy Elemental

A positive energy elemental appears as a shimmering sphere of brilliant white energy with small motes of light winking in and out of existence. Its attacks imbue bonus hit points upon targets that last up to one hour. A creature reaching double its normal hit points explodes. When slain, a positive energy elemental detonates in a 30-foot-radius blast that heals 1d6 points of damage per 2 HD.

  • Positive Energy Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (1d6 healing); Move (Fly 36); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Positive energy burst
  • Positive Energy Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (1d6 healing); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Positive energy burst
  • Positive Energy Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (1d6 healing); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Positive energy burst

Source: Positive Energy Elemental from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Psionic Elemental

Psionic elementals appear as a dark, semi-translucent clouds of swirling vapor. They have their origin on a plane composed entirely of psionic matter and seldom venture from their home except when summoned by a spellcaster. It is unknown whether psionic elementals can speak; all communication with these creatures thus far has been through telepathy. Looking closely at a psionic elemental’s form reveals two small pinpoints and a mouth formed of solid bits of matter swirling in the elemental’s form.

Psionic elementals can cast the following spells: dimension door, esp, magic missile (3/day) and suggestion (3/day). Large psionic elementals can also use telekinesis at will. They enjoy a +2 bonus to saving throws against mind-controlling or affecting spells or abilities.

By folding the dimensions around its body, a psionic elemental can automatically deflect one attack per round directed against it back upon the attacker. The attacker takes full damage just as if he had hit the psionic elemental (including any special effects of the attack). Spells can be reflected using this power, but only those that specifically target the elemental. Area of effect spells are not reflected and have full effect on the psionic elemental.

  • Psionic Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 1 [18]; Atk Strike (2d6); Move (Fly 24); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Psionic powers, +1 or better weapon to hit, magic resistance (30%), telepathy 100 ft., warp reality
  • Psionic Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 1 [18]; Atk Strike (2d6); Move (Fly 24); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 16/3200; Special: Psionic powers, +1 or better weapon to hit, magic resistance (30%), telepathy 100 ft., warp reality
  • Psionic Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 1 [18]; Atk Strike (2d6); Move (Fly 24); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 20/4400; Special: Psionic powers, +1 or better weapon to hit, magic resistance (30%), telepathy 100 ft., warp reality

Source: Psionic Elemental from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Time Elemental

Time elementals are creatures from an elemental plane most sages are unaware even exists. A time elemental is a powerful creature formed of pure time and matter such as is unknown to even the most learned of sages. It is unknown how or why time elementals enter the Material Plane, as they cannot be summoned using the standard summoning spells. Time elementals appear as formless clouds of coppery vapor or sparkling dust about 5 feet in diameter. They attack by forming misty or smoky arms from their forms and lashing at opponents or by spraying a fine mist onto their opponents so as to induce aging. Damage dealt by a time elemental’s slam attack does not heal naturally, but it can still be healed magically. A creature slain by a time elemental can only be raised through the successful casting of a wish spell.

Once per day, a noble time elemental can age a creature simply by touching it (this requires a melee attack that ignores one’s armor bonus to AC). If successful, the target must succeed on a saving throw or advance forward one aging step (from adulthood to middle age, from middle age to old, from old to venerable, and so on). A venerable creature affected by this ability dies and cannot be restored to life by mortal magic. Alternately, a time elemental can use its alter age ability to reduce a character’s age. A character that regresses in age does not revert to earlier mental states, retaining all memories and mental abilities. This ability does not affect a character that has died from old age. A time elemental can also use this ability to age vegetable matter 10-200 years (older or younger) or mineral matter 100-2,000 years (older or younger). Royal time elementals can use this ability twice per day.

A time elemental exists in several other dimensions at any given time. It can bring forth 1d4 of these manifestations to its current locale in order to gain multiple attacks that round. Treat each manifestation as a separate time elemental with hit points equal to the time elemental’s current hit points. A manifestation cannot use any of the spell abilities of the time elemental except foresight. A time elemental cannot have more than four manifestations present at one time. Because each manifestation is a part of the time elemental that called them, a successful attack on the time elemental or any of its manifestations deals an equal amount of damage to them all.

By making a melee attack against a foe, a noble or royal time elemental can remove that creature from the current time stream. On a failed save, the creature disappears in a flash of white energy. For a number of minutes equal to the time elemental’s Hit Dice, the displaced creature is effectively nonexistent. No form of magic, effect, or force can detect or aid such a creature. When the effect ends, the creature reappears in the same space it was in before being displaced. If the space is occupied when the creature returns, it is shunted aside to the first open space and takes no damage. A noble or royal time elemental can use this ability three times per day.

A time elemental can slip through the time stream and appear anywhere on the same plane of existence as if by teleporting. This ability transports the time elemental and up to four other creatures within a 30-foot radius. Unwilling creatures can attempt a saving throw to avoid being carried away.

Once per day, a royal time elemental can attempt to summon 1d4 common time elementals with a 70% chance of success or 1-2 noble time elementals with a 30% chance of success. Noble and royal time elementals can create an effect identical to a time stop spell once per day. All time elementals can see a few seconds into the future. This ability prevents it from being surprised. Time elementals are immune to all time-related spells and effects (though the time stop ability of the noble and royal time elementals can affect those time elementals of lesser power).

  • Common Time Elemental: HD 12; AC 0 [19]; Atk 2 slams (2d6 plus cell death); Move (Fly 9); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 20/4400; Special: Cell death, multi- manifestation, foresight, immunity to magic, magic resistance (40%), time jaunt, +1 or better weapon to hit
  • Noble Time Elemental: HD 20; AC -3 [22]; Atk 2 slams (2d8 plus cell death); Move (Fly 9); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 32/8600; Special: Alter age, cell death, multi-manifestation, temporal displacement, time stop, foresight, immunity to magic, magic resistance (50%), time jaunt, +2 or better weapon to hit
  • Royal Time Elemental: HD 24; AC -5 [24]; Atk 2 slams (2d8 plus cell death); Move (Fly 9); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 37/9500; Special: Alter age, cell death, multi-manifestation, summon time elementals, temporal displacement, time stop, foresight, immunity to magic, magic resistance (60%), time jaunt, +3 or better weapon to hit

Source: Time Elemental from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Water Elemental

Water elementals cannot move more than 60 ft. from a large body of water, and their damage is reduced by 1d6 if the opponent is not standing in water (or swimming, etc). These powerful beings can overturn small boats, and can overturn a ship if given 1d4+4 rounds to work at it. On water, they can attack ships, battering them to pieces within 1 hour if not prevented or distracted.

  • Water Elemental (8 HD): HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (3d10); Move 6 (Swim 18); Save 8; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: overturn boats, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Water Elemental (12 HD): HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (3d10); Move 6 (Swim 18); Save 3; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: overturn boats, immune to non-magic weapons.
  • Water Elemental (16 HD): HD 16; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 strike (3d10); Move 6 (Swim 18); Save 3; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: overturn boats, immune to non-magic weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Elemental Constructs

Elemental constructs are golems or automatons forged of one of the four basic elements—air, earth, fire, or water—bound to serve their creator. The creation of an elemental construct requires no less than five elemental spirits (of the same type) which are unwillingly bound into the form of the elemental construct.

Elemental constructs are used by powerful mages as servants, bodyguards, and assassins. An elemental construct, like any other automaton follows any order or command given to it to the best of its ability.

An elemental construct’s creator can command it if the construct is within 60 feet and can see and hear its creator. If not commanded, an elemental construct usually follows its last instruction to the best of its ability, though if attacked it returns the attack. The creator can give the elemental construct a simple command to govern its actions in his or her absence. The elemental construct’s creator can order the construct to obey the commands of another person (who might in turn place the elemental construct under someone else’s control, and so on), but the elemental construct’s creator can always resume control over his creation by commanding the elemental construct to obey him alone.

Each elemental construct appears as a humanoid creature about 9 feet tall and is composed entirely of its native element.

Air Elemental Construct

An air elemental construct is a 9-foot-tall semi-vaporous humanoid composed of air and mist. An air elemental construct transforms the air in a 30-foot radius around it into a forceful blast of wind and debris that deals 2d6 points of damage. Control winds and control weather spells heal an air elemental construct (1d8 per spell level). Any cold-based attack slows an air elemental construct. No other type of spell affects an air elemental construct.

  • Air Elemental Construct: HD 90 hit points; AC 2 [17]; Atk Pummel (3d6) or wind blast 30 ft. radius (2d6); Move (Fly 36); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Immune to magic, +2 or better magic weapon required to hit

Air Elemental Construct from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Earth Elemental Construct

An earth elemental construct is a 12-foot-tall humanoid composed of dirt and rock. An earth elemental charges opponents, dealing 2d6 points of damage with a hit. An earthquake spell immediately destroys an earth elemental construct. Transmute rock to mud and move earth heals an earth elemental construct (1d8 per spell level). No other type of spell affects an earth elemental construct.

  • Earth Elemental Construct: HD 90 hit points; AC 2 [17]; Atk Pound (4d6) or trample (2d6); Move 8; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Immune to magic, +2 or better magic weapon required to hit

Source: Earth Elemental Construct from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fire Elemental Construct

A fire elemental construct is a 9-foot-tall humanoid composed of flame. Their attacks cause flammable materials (including wood) to ignite. A fire elemental construct launches a bolt of fire 90 feet that does 2d6 points of damage. Fire-based spells heal a fire elemental construct (1d8 per spell level). Cold-based spells do double damage to the creature. No other spells affect a fire elemental construct.

  • Fire Elemental Construct: HD 90 hit points; AC 2 [17]; Atk Strike (3d6) or fire bolt (2d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Immune to magic, immune to fire, +2 or better magic weapon required to hit, ignite materials

Source: Fire Elemental Construct from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Water Elemental Construct

A water elemental construct is a 10-foot-tall humanoid composed entirely of water. The elemental’s slam attack engulfs opponents, and they drown in 2d4 rounds if they can’t escape the creature’s liquid form. Create water heals a water elemental construct (1d8 per spell level). Lower water instantly destroys a water elemental construct, while part water divides the creature into 2 equal halves. Fire-based spells do double damage. No other spell affects a water elemental construct.

  • Water Elemental Construct: HD 90 hit points; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (3d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Immune to magic, +2 or better magic weapon required to hit, engulf, drown

Source: Fire Elemental Construct from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Elemental Dragons

Air Elemental Dragon

The Elemental Plane of Air is home to many creatures: elementals, belkers, and the great djinni. Yet none are as feared as the elemental air dragons. Their great form and majestic aura strike fear into the bravest of souls. Elemental air dragons are as chaotic as their brethren (the other elemental dragons) and take joy and pride in swooping over a settlement or village and destroying it with their cyclonic powers. Watching the frightened creatures flee in terror provokes some sort of perverse excitement in these dragons. Luckily, elemental air dragons rarely enter the Material Plane. Elemental air dragons dislike cloud dragons and mist dragons and seek to slay them whenever they are encountered. The average air elemental dragon is 30 feet long and appears to be a huge dragon composed of vapor and smoke. Three times per day, an elemental air dragons can breath a cone of superheated air. The cone measures 50 feet long and 30 feet at the base and inflicts 10d8 points of damage (save for half).

By beating its wings rapidly back and forth, a hovering elemental air dragon can create a cyclone-like force of wind in a 30-foot radius around its body. This cyclone has the following effects: movement through the cyclone is one-third normal, ranged attacks suffer a -6 penalty in the area, and all non-magical unprotected flames are extinguished. Creatures in the area must succeed on a saving throw or take 3d6 points of damage each round they remain in the area. Human sized or smaller creatures in the area must succeed on a second saving throw or be knocked prone and back 1d4 x 10 feet, taking 1d6 points of nonlethal (i.e. cannot reduce hit points lower than 1) damage per 10 feet. Flying creatures are automatically grounded in this area.

Elemental air dragons can cast control weather once per day.

  • Air Elemental Dragon: HD 24; AC -2 [21]; Atk Bite (2d10), 2 claws (2d8); Move 9/48 (flying); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 33/8300; Special: Breath weapon, cyclone, spells, +2 or better weapon to hit

Source: Air Elemental Dragon from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Earth Elemental Dragon

Elemental earth dragons are the strongest of the elemental dragons. Using their great stone tail or earthen claws, they can destroy almost anything in short order. The majority of their time is spent burrowing through the Elemental Plane of Earth devouring gems, minerals, and silicate life forms. On occasion, they are summoned to the Material Plane by evil (and foolish) spellcasters who usually live just long enough to regret their mistake. Elemental earth dragons are chaotic (perhaps the most chaotic of the elemental dragons in addition to being the strongest) and despise most other forms of life. They rarely associate with other creatures, though a few have been known to have dealings with the occasional earth elemental. Elemental earth dragons cannot enter water; they must burrow under it or walk around it. The average elemental earth dragon is 30 feet long and resembles a massive wyrm composed of polished stone. Its roar can be heard up to 5 miles away.

Three times per day an elemental earth dragon can breath a cone of scorched earth, 50 feet long and 30 feet wide at the base. Creatures inside this cone suffer 14d8 points of damage (save for half).

When an elemental earth dragon slays an opponent, it dehydrates the flesh with its breath weapon and pulverizes the bones. The residue is then absorbed into the dragon’s body. An assimilated creature can only be restored to life using wish, but even then, there is a 50% chance that such powerful magic fails.

An elemental earth dragon can hold itself so still it appears to be a statue. An observer has a 1 in 10 chance (1 in 6 for dwarves) to notice that the elemental earth dragon is really alive. In addition, an elemental earth dragon can meld its body with any stone surface large enough to accommodate its entire body.

  • Earth Elemental Dragon: HD 24; AC -3 [22]; Atk Bite (2d12), 2 claws (2d8); Move 9/30/9 (flying/burrowing); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 33/8300; Special: Assimilation, breath weapon, only harmed by +2 or better weapons, freeze, meld into stone

Source: Earth Elemental Dragon from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fire Elemental Dragon

This creature appears as a 30-foot long dragon composed of fire. Its eyes burn with a white-hot flame and flames lick the dragon’s great mouth as it roars. As it flies overhead, its wings send sheets of flame roaring into the sky and crashing into the ground.

One of the most feared creatures from the Elemental Plane of Fire is the dreaded elemental fire dragon. Composed entirely of flames, these magnificent creatures fear little and are respected and feared by those that have encountered them. Elemental fire dragons are malign and vicious. They delight in killing and torturing others, especially magmin (whom they relish as a delicacy). They employ salamanders to aid them in their ventures, but once they have accomplished their goals, any survivors are devoured. Elemental fire dragons cannot enter water or any other nonflammable liquid. The typical elemental fire dragon is at least 30 feet long and looks like a sinuous dragon composed entirely of fire, with white hot eyes and gouts of smoke leaking from between its teeth.

Anyone within 60 feet of an elemental fire dragon must succeed on a saving throw or take 1d6 points of fire damage from the intense heat. Creatures attacking an elemental fire dragon unarmed or with natural weapons take 1d6 points of damage each time one of their attacks hits. Combustibles automatically catch fire if they contact an elemental fire dragon.

Three times per day an elemental fire dragon can breath a cone of elemental fire, 50 feet long and 30 feet wide at the base. This fire inflicts 16d10 points of damage (save for half).

An elemental fire dragon can hover and rapidly beat its wings causing fire to rain down on an area in a 100-foot radius. Creatures within the area must succeed on saving throw or take 2d8 points of fire damage as clothes catch fire or armor and weapons become searing hot. The damage continues for another 1d8 rounds after the attack or until the flames are extinguished. Combustibles in the area automatically catch on fire.

  • Fire Elemental Dragon: HD 24; AC -5 [24]; Atk Bite (2d8 plus 2d8 fire), 2 claws (2d6 plus 2d6 fire); Move 15/36 (flying); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 33/8300; Special: Breath weapon, fiery aura, rain of fire, only harmed by +3 or better weapons, immune to fire, double damage from cold

Source: Fire Elemental Dragon from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Water Elemental Dragon

From the Elemental Plane of Water comes the elemental water dragon. They make their homes in the deep oceans of the Material Plane and are rarely found far away from large expanses of water. An elemental water dragon is composed entirely of water and commands respect from the more intelligent sea creatures as well as those humanoids that ply their trade upon the waters. Elemental water dragons are chaotic and take great pleasure in demanding sacrifice from those that dare enter their realm. If the sacrifice placates the dragon, it lets the creature pass unabated; otherwise, it attacks with all of its might and most often destroys those that offend it or fail to appease its desires. Water dragons take great pleasure in capsizing and sinking ships. On occasion, a group of sahuagin or locathah can be found allied with an elemental water dragon, but this alliance is usually short-lived and often shaky and ends with the death of the fish men.

When submerged, an elemental water dragon is effectively invisible (1 in 12 chance to spot, 1 in 10 chance for elves) until it attacks. A submerged elemental water dragon that surfaces under a boat or ship of less than 20 feet long capsizes the vessel 95% of the time. It has a 50% chance to capsize a vessel from 20 to 60 feet long and a 20% chance to capsize one over 60 feet long.

Three times per day an elemental water dragon can breath a cone of superheated water, 50 feet long and 30 feet wide at the base. The breath weapon inflicts 14d8 points of damage (save for half).

The elemental water dragon’s touch puts out torches, campfires, exposed lanterns, and other open flames of nonmagical origin as long as they are no larger than a house fire. The creature can dispel magical fire it touches as the dispel magic spell. It can part water and lower water each once per day.

  • Water Elemental Dragon: HD 24; AC -2 [21]; Atk Bite (2d8), 2 claws (2d6); Move 15/36 (flying and swimming); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 33/8300; Special: Breath weapon, capsize, drench, spells, only harmed by +2 or better weapons, transparency

Source: Water Elemental Dragon from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Elephant

Trained elephants can carry a howdah upon their backs, with up to six people within. In battle, wounded elephants may become maddened and go on a rampage, ignoring all training.

  • Elephant: HD 10; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 trunk (1d10), 2 gore (1d10), 2 trample (2d6); Move 12; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Elf

The example above is for a typical Elf; trained warriors would likely have the maximum 9 hit points. Obviously, Elves encountered in the course of a party’s adventuring will have a variety of powers and different attributes. The Referee will assign such powers as he sees fit, in accordance with the way he envisions elves. They might be the woodland dwellers of Tolkien’s The Hobbit, or the high Elves of the Lord of the Rings, or might be the faerie folk of Irish legend. In any case, the Referee should not bother trying to fit an idea of “advanced” Elves into the constraints of character classes—just assign their attributes to fit the concept. Non-player characters are not subject to the rules that govern building a player character; they are tools for good fantasy.

  • Elf: HD 1+1; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 sword (1d8) or 2 arrows (1d6); Move 12; Save 17; AL L (or N); CL/XP 1/15; Special: Darkvision 60ft, 4 in 6 chance to find secret doors, immune to ghoul paralysis.

Source: Monstrosities

Elusa Hound

The elusa hound appears as a powerful wolf-like dog with pale white, coarse fur (though some recent breeds have whitish-gray fur) and a short, bushy tail. Its eyes burn with a ghostly yellow glow and its teeth are ivory white. The dog is attuned to Magic-Users and can track them unerringly using its ability to detect magic at will.

  • Elusa Hound: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d6+1); Move 15; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Detect magic

Source: Elusa Hound from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Encephalon Gorger

An encephalon gorger is a sleek, pale-skinned humanoid standing about 7 feet tall, with long, thin arms and legs. Its hands and feet end in four digits; the two middle digits being slightly longer than the outer two. Its mouth is lined with short, needle-like teeth, with the canines being most pronounced. An encephalon gorger’s tongue is sleek and black. An encephalon gorger strikes and tears at its victims with its sharp claws. If it hits with two claws, it grabs the victim and automatic starts to mindfeed in the next round. To mindfeed, the gorger sinks its teeth into the prey’s head to drain cerebral fluid (1d6 points of damage per round). Twice per day, a gorger can give itself an adrenal boost of speed (similar to a haste spell). An encephalon gorger heals 3 hit points per round.

  • Encephalon Gorger: HD 8; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d6+1); Move 6; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: mindfeed, resists cold, haste, regenerate 3 hp/round

Source: Encephalon Gorger from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Ethereal Shade

An ethereal shade resembles a mass of black, wispy smoke, which billows and contracts as it floats about. Ethereal Shades are undead and are thus affected by a cleric’s Turn Undead ability (treat as a Type 9 undead). At night, or in darkness, it becomes nearly invisible. The referee may require a check or saving throw to spot an ethereal shade in such conditions. Battling an ethereal shade in dimly illuminated environments incurs a -4 penalty to hit. The ethereal shade inflicts damage by use of its icy touch. Ethereal Shades are immune to damage from non-magical weapons.

By wrapping itself around a victim’s head, the ethereal shade may momentarily distract and befuddle its foe. The effects are similar to a Confusion spell and last as long as the ethereal shade remains wrapped around the victim’s head. Any damage inflicted upon the creature while it is wrapped around a foe will result in the ethereal shade taking half the damage, and its engulfed victim taking the other half. (Author Skathros).

  • Ethereal Shade: HD 8; AC 1 [18]; Atk Icy touch (2d6) or befuddlement; Move 9; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Hard to see, immune to non-magic weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Ettercap

Ettercaps are a strange race of spindly, long-armed bipeds about seven feet tall. They have spider-like spinnerets, and are often found in the company of giant spiders. Ettercaps are flesh-eating predators who use their spinnerets to create traps of various kinds such as web-filled pits or deadfall traps with silken ropes.

  • Ettercap: HD 5; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d8 + poison); Move 12; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Poison bite, traps.

Source: Monstrosities

Ettin

Ettins are two-headed giants, twelve to fifteen feet tall. They are difficult to catch by surprise, and make excellent guardians.

  • Ettin: HD 10; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 clubs (3d6); Move 12; Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Executioner’s Hood

The executioner’s hood is a deadly monster, black in color and 1 inch thick, that resembles an actual executioner’s hood or a small black bag. It has two eyeholes that can be used to see into or out of the monster (if some unfortunate soul happens actually to pick it up — or worse, put it on). The executioner’s hood is sometimes used to guard valuable belongings. It does so unerringly as long as a constant supply of food is available. The executioner’s hood clings to the ceiling, waiting for prey to pass under it. When prey passes by, the hood drops and attempts to engulf the victim’s head. Slain victims are slowly devoured by the hood.

An executioner’s hood can try to wrap the head of a victim by making a normal melee attack against a surprised opponent. If successful, it establishes a hold and deals 1d4 points of damage each round it remains on the victim’s head. Opponents can tear it off by making a successful open doors roll as though their strength was 3 points lower. A creature whose head is engulfed cannot breathe, but can hold her breath for 2 rounds per point of constitution. After this period of time, the character must make a saving throw each round in order to continue holding her breath, with each successive roll made at a cumulative -1 penalty. When the character fails one of these saving throws, she suffocates and dies. Attacks that hit an engulfing executioner’s hood deal half their damage to the monster and half to the trapped victim. An creature whose head is engulfed cannot cast spells.

An executioner’s hood is vulnerable to wine, ale, brandy, or any other strong alcoholic drink. Each quart poured on the hood deals 1 point of damage to the creature. After the hood has taken 4 points of damage, it releases its hold on its opponent and drops to the ground. The next morning it suffers from a terrible headache unless properly hydrated.

  • Executioner’s Hood: HD 2; AC 4 [15]; Atk Choke (1d4); Move 6/3 (climbing); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Engulf, immune to sleep, vulnerable to alcohol

Source: Executioner’s Hood from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Exoskeleton, Giant (Ant)

Giant ant exoskeletons can be animated into undead creatures by unusual and rare necromantic magic. They are not poisonous. These dry husks are turned as skeletons. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Giant Ant Exoskeleton: HD 1; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Immune to sleep, hold, and charm spells, half damage from piercing and slashing weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Exoskeleton, Giant (Beetle)

Giant beetle exoskeletons are animated by necromantic magic quite different from that used in the Animate Dead spell. Bladed and piercing weapons cannot damage these dry, massive husks. They can be turned as ghasts, but are usually protected from turning by potent glyphs carved into their chitin exteriors. The insides of a giant beetle exoskeleton are quite hollow, and more than one necromancer has carpeted and cushioned the interior of a giant beetle exoskeleton for use as a slow-moving vehicle. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Giant Beetle Exoskeleton: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 6; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Immune to turning, unaffected by sleep, hold, and charm, immune to non-blunt weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Exoskeleton, Giant (Crab)

Giant crab exoskeletons are animated by specific necromantic spells, cast upon the very largest giant crab exoskeletons (10 ft. in diameter). Bladed and piercing weapons cannot damage these animated empty shells. They can be turned as mummies, but are usually protected from turning by potent glyphs carved into the shell, as are most giant exoskeletons. The insides are hollow, and up to four people can travel inside. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Giant Crab Exoskeleton: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 pincers (2d6); Move 6; Save 11; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Immune to turning, unaffected by sleep, hold, and charm, immune to non-blunt weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Exploding Bones

Nearly identical to skeletons in appearance, Exploding Bones differ in coloring from their more mundane counterparts. Exploding Bones are a bright pulsating red, their coloring becoming brighter and pulsating faster as they near death and the inevitable explosion which gives them their name.

When these crimson skeletons reach 0 hp their bodies explode sending a shower of jagged bones, which hit all within 20ft. All within this radius suffer 1d6 points of damage from the explosive shower of bony shrapnel. A successful Saving Throw halves this damage. Exploding bones are treated as Type 2 undead for turning purposes. (Auhtor Skathros)

  • Exploding Bones: HD 2; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Explode when killed.

Source: Monstrosities

Eye Killer

Eye killers are subterranean dwellers that hate daylight. They dwell underground in dark places, where very little light can touch their sensitive eyes. They are evil, malicious creatures that delight in killing others, particularly those that wander to close to their lair. Eye killers are limbless spherical things at birth, but take a form that resembles a cross between a bat and a snake as they mature. The adult creature’s upper torso is that of a large bat while its lower torso is that of a snake. Dark green fur covers its upper body, while yellow-green scales cover its lower body. Its eyes are large, lidless, white circles without pupils. The average adult eye killer reaches a length of 7 feet. Its bat wings are useless. Eye killers seem to communicate with each other through a series of low rumbles and growls. They do not speak any known language.

The victim of an eye killer’s tail attack must pass a saving throw or be wrapped and constricted for 1d6 points of automatic damage each round until freed with a successful open doors check.

By using natural or magical light that illuminates it (i.e. it cannot be in the dark), an eye killer can amplify the light and refocus it in a line that functions as a death ray to a range of 50 feet. The eye killer must make a ranged attack against its target. If successful, the creature struck must make succeed on a saving throw or die instantly. Even if the save succeeds, the victim takes 3d6 points of damage. An eye killer can use this gaze once per day. Eye killers are immune to their own gaze attack and to the gaze attack of other eye killers. If the eye killer’s gaze attack is reflected back upon it, it amplifies the intensity and projects it at a new target as a free action. The saving throw against this amplified gaze attack is made at a -2 penalty.

If natural sunlight is brought within 5 feet of an eye killer, it immediately releases a constricted foe and attempts to move as far away from the source of light as possible. On subsequent rounds, an eye killer is dazzled as long as it remains within 5 feet of the light source.

Umbral Eye Killer

The umbral or shadow eye killer is a variant of the standard eye killer. It uses the statistics above for the standard eye killer but can see perfectly even in magic darkness and can cast darkness 20’ radius three times per day.

  • Eye Killer: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk Tail (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Constrict, death gaze, light vulnerability

Source: Eye Killer from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Ian Livingston.

Source: Umbral Eye Killer from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Eye of the Deep

The eye of the deep is a 5-foot wide orb dominated by a central eye and large serrated mouth. Hundreds of small seaweed-like bristles hang from the bottom of its body. Two large crab-like pincers protrude from its body, and two long, thin eyestalks sprout from the top of its orb. Eyes of the deep are found only in the deepest parts of the ocean, though on occasion one moves too close to the shoreline and ends up beaching on the sands. An eye of the deep stranded in this manner dies in 2d4 minutes unless placed back into the water. Eyes of the deep speak their own language and the common tongue of seafaring humans. Creatures struck by the eye of the deep’s pincers must pass a saving throw or be caught and crushed for 2d4 points of automatic damage each round until they can pry open those pincers with an open doors check.

Each of the creature’s eyes stalks can produce a magical ray once per round. The creature can aim both of its eye rays in any direction. Each of its eye rays resembles a spell cast by a 12th-level caster and requires a ranged attack (ignores armor) to hit. Each eye ray has a range of 150 feet. The left eye emits a hold person ray, while the right eye emits a hold monster ray. By combining both eye rays, the eye of the deep can replicate the phantasmal force spell.

An eye of the deep’s central eye can, once per round, produce a cone extending straight ahead from its front to a range of 30 feet. Creatures in the area must succeed on a saving throw or be stunned for 2d4 rounds.

  • Eye of the Deep: HD 10; AC 4 [15]; Atk Eye rays (see below), 2 pincers (2d4), bite (1d6); Move 3/9 (swimming); Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Constrict, eye rays, stun cone

Source: Eye of the Deep from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Eyeless Filcher

An eyeless filcher is the undead body of a criminal maimed or tortured to death in brutal punishment for its crimes; usually these criminals were guilty of particularly heinous crimes during life. These creatures are animated by an extremely powerful undead force, which causes fear and horror in any onlooker: at the sight of an eyeless filcher, anyone failing a saving throw will either flee in terror for 1d12 rounds or be paralyzed until the undead is out of sight (equal chance). The eyeless filcher shares the same resistances and weaknesses of other powerful undead; it is immune to cold-based and mind-affecting spells, magical weapons are required to hit it, it can be turned by a cleric (as a wraith), and suffers harm from holy water (2d8). As there is precious little flesh left on its bones, the eyeless filcher suffers half damage from edged and pointed weapons. It may be distracted by the sight of symbols of law and justice, such as the insignia of the city watch or the holy symbol of a deity of law, and will break off attacking to focus its rage on this image. An eyeless filcher retains any criminal knowledge and thieving skills it had in life, and will use these to its advantage. In combat, if both of its claw attacks hit, it latches on with inhuman strength, strangling for automatic damage (2d6 total) per round thereafter; its deadly grip can only be broken by distracting symbols as above, the death of its victim, or a sincere apology from anyone involved in its own capture, trial, and punishment. If the eyeless filcher manages to kill an officer of the law, whether guard or magistrate or scribe of the court, the unfortunate victim rises from the dead the next day as a double-strength zombie under its control. The eyeless filcher attacks and steals, deliberately causing as much chaos and fear as it can. If a law officer renounces his profession in the creature’s presence it will sink to the ground, destroyed, with a mocking laugh. (Auhtor Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Eyeless Filcher: HD 9; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d8); Move 12; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 12/1700; Special: Immune to non-magic weapons, strangle, half damage from non-blunt weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

F

False Spider, Giant

False spiders are spiderlike creatures that are very aggressive and highly predatory in nature, often hunting at night when the element of surprise is theirs to be had. False spiders dwell in shallow burrows which the dig with their massive pincers. There are two kinds of false spiders: pedipalps and solifugids.

False spiders are highly territorial and are likely to attack any living creature that enters their area.

Pedipalp

Pedipalps are called whip scorpions and look like a cross between a spider and a scorpion. They have eight legs and two thin antennae. Its front sports two spider-like eyes and a set of large mandibles. Two large scorpion-like pincers protrude from just in front of its foremost legs. The average pedipalp is 5 feet long but can grow to a length of 10 feet.

  • Pedipalp: HD 2; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: none

Source: False Spider, Giant (Pedipalp) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Pedipalp, Poisonous

The poisonous pedipalp is a rare variety of the species. Rarely encountered, the poisonous pedipalp is a solitary creature; no more than one has ever been encountered at a given time. They do not associate with others of their kind or with normal pedipalps. The poisonous pedipalp uses the same statistics as the normal pedipalp with save it has a challenge level of 3. When threatened, a poisonous pedipalp releases a cloud of noxious fumes in a 20-foot radius around its body. Living creatures within the cloud must succeed on a saving throw or be nauseated for 1d6 rounds. The poisonous pedipalp can use this cloud three times per day.

  • Poisonous Pedipalp: HD 2; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Noxious Cloud

Source: False Spider, Giant (Pedipalp, Poisonous) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Solifugid

    Solifugids are at least 6 feet long but can grow to a length of 12 feet. They have eight legs, two spider-like eyes and a set of large, clicking, hooked mandibles. Two large scorpion-like pincers protrude from just in front of its foremost legs.

  • Solifugid: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: none

Source: False Spider, Giant (Solifugid) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Falshantog-Yoth (Fal-yoth, the “Hungering Vines”)

The Hungering Vines lives in darkness, with a ravenous hunger that can only be satiated by blood and flesh. This creature resembles a writhing mass of vines coming together at a trunk, supported by 4 huge roots. Many eye-stalks jut from the trunk, peering about for food; Fal-yoth is almost never surprised. The vines pull fresh carrion under its roots, where there is a huge mouth that consumes the plant’s victims. Fal-yoth can move surprisingly fast in a shambling gait, once it pulls its roots from the ground or rock into which it has settled. It takes 1 round for its vines to push it from the earth and allow it to move. Fal-yoth attacks any and all creatures that stray within reach of its vines (10ft) for 1d8 damage, or will twist its vines into a sort of “tail,” which can batter a single target for a colossal 4d10 points of damage. Any target hit by the “tail” will be knocked down and backward 1d4x10ft.

If a weapon successfully hits Fal-yoth, the creature’s corrosive sap spatters the weapon and destroys it. Magical weapons are permitted a saving throw. Fal-yoth can also generate a sphere of darkness within 30’ that lasts 1d4 rounds, every 10 minutes. Fal-yoth is partially immune to lightning attacks, taking half normal damage from such attacks. A saving throw is required each combat round to resist the horror of the hunger radiating from Fal-yoth. If a character fails his save, he is paralyzed by horror and unable to act that round. It may be that more than one of these creatures exist, but only one is known. (Author: Chgowiz).

  • Falshantog-yoth – The Hungering Vines: HD 8, AC 9 [10], Atk all within 10 ft. (1d8) or 1 “tail” (4d10); Move 13 (0 when planted); Save 8, AL C; CL/XP 12/2000, Special: Destroys weapons successfully hitting it, generates darkness, partially immune to lightning, causes fear.

Source: Monstrosities

Fear Guard

Fear guards appear as translucent hooded figures wearing flowing robes of gray or black over a suit of incorporeal armor. Their hands end in terrible claws. Their faces are a swirl of maddening images, fluctuating between a serene and calm countenance to a face twisted in horror and fear. Fear guards strike from the shadows, using their incorporeal touch. Any creature slain by the creature becomes a fear guard within 1d6 rounds. A fear guard radiates fear (as per the spell) in a 10-foot radius. Twice a day, a fear guard can cast darkness, 15 ft. radius.

  • Fear Guard: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk Incorporeal touch (1d6); Move 12 (flying); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Fear aura, spell-like abilities, create spawn

Source: Fear Guard from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Felikaur

Felikaur were magically bred from tigers in ancient times, as a battle-beast of the feuding noble houses. Some escaped into the wild and flourished. The felikaur looks like a massive tiger, but with overlapping horn plates instead of fur. They have large bat-like wings sprouting from the shoulders, and a spiky tail. These creatures are intelligent enough to prepare ambushes and use their surroundings to tactical advantage; in the wild, they leap from cover to cover while attacking. In a gladiatorial arena, they are able to take advantage of pit traps, spikes, barriers, or other such tactical obstacles.

A felikaur’s tail spikes deal little damage, but secrete a paralysing toxin. They can also pick up a human or smaller foe, carry it into the air for a few rounds, and drop it from a height of 20 to 60 feet. Lastly, the felikaur can spit a glob of corrosive acid to a distance of 20 feet, for 1d6 to 3d6 damage (in any given day, the available stomach acid permits a total of 9 dice of potential damage). This acid will eat through and ruin clothing, non-magical armor, backpack straps, etc, in 1 round. The means by which the ancients controlled and tamed these beasts is unknown – they cannot be trained. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Felikaur: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), 1 bite (2d6), and tail (1d4+paralysis)); Move 15 (Fly 18); Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Spit acid, drop opponents, surprise.

Source: Monstrosities

Fen Witch

The fen witch is a creature of legend, found only in the most remote of places. It is a female humanoid with one nostril, webbed feet and hands, fiery red eyes and long, unkempt hair. It is a solitary creature and disdains all that invade its realm. The sight of a fen witch is so revolting that anyone who sets eyes upon one must succeed on a saving throw or instantly be weakened, taking 1d8 points of strength damage. This ability loss cannot reduce a victim’s Strength score to 0.

The fen witch can communicate telepathically with any creature within 100 feet that has a language. A fen witch can peer into the mind of a living creature within 60 feet in an attempt to extract the creature’s true name. The target can resist the mental trespassing by succeeding on a saving throw that requires all of their concentration. If the save fails, the fen witch has learned the creature’s true name and can use her death speak ability. Creatures with an intelligence score of 2 or less and non-sentient creatures are immune to this ability.

If the fen witch speaks the true name of an individual and the individual hears it, that creature must make a successful saving throw or die. If the save succeeds, that creature cannot be affected again by the same fen witch’s death speak for one day. Whether the fen witch’s death speak ability is successful or not, the target’s name remains fresh in her mind for one day. After that, she must use her mind probe ability again to retrieve a creature’s true name.

  • Fen Witch: HD 6; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d4); Move 12; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Death speak, horrific appearance, mind probe, magic resistance (25%)

Source: Fen Witch from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Ferec (Foxtaur)

Orange-furred and bushy-tailed with large ears and multiple limbs, the Ferec is a mutated fox. It has a long body, with four pairs of legs, and a centaur-like humanoid torso with two pairs of arms. Despite its creative intelligence and expansive vocabulary, the ferec is excitable, superstitious, and easily distracted. It excels in various forms of craftsmanship, and enjoys puzzling out the workings of traps, puzzle boxes, unusual weapons, or other such contraptions. The heightened senses of a ferec, including superior night vision and heightened hearing, ensure it will never be surprised. They are sensitive to sunlight, and prefer a nocturnal lifestyle. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Ferec: HD 6+3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 weapons (1d6) and 1 bite (1d4); Move 18; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 6/400XP; Special: Cannot be surprised.

Source: Monstrosities

Fetch

A ragged-looking and rotting humanoid leaps from the snow, its filthy nails slashing through the frosty air. Its eyes are stark blue and its skin is pale white. Ice hangs from its scraggly hair. A fetch stands anywhere from 5 to 7 feet tall and weighs between 100 and 250 pounds. Its rotting flesh is drawn tight around its bones and flushed grayish-white. Its hair is scraggly and frozen and ice crystals cover its skin. A fetch’s eyes are stark blue. Fetches strike with their claws, which are supernaturally cold and deal 1d4 points of cold damage. A fetch is vulnerable to fire (taking an extra 50% damage).

  • Fetch: HD 3+2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d4); Move 6; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Freezing touch, immune to cold, vulnerable to fire

Source: Fetch from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fire Crab

A fire crab resembles a large crab in most respects. Its carapace is reddish-brown with dark red or yellow markings and its body is slightly square-shaped. Tiny flames lick its body, erupting at irregular intervals from its underbelly. Its eyes are perched on the end of two large eyestalks that protrude from the center of the carapace. Fire crabs have large claws and in males, one claw is always larger (at least three times larger) than the other. Fire crabs have six segmented and spindly legs, blackish-red in color. Fire crabs generate intense heat, dealing heat damage with their claw attacks.

  • Fire Crab (1 HD): HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d3 + 1d4 fire); Move 6/9 (swim); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Heat, immune to fire
  • Fire Crab (4 HD): HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d6 + 1d6 fire); Move 9/12 (swim); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Heat, immune to fire

Source: Fire Crab from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fire Nymph

Fire nymphs are beautiful females with long, flowing, fiery-red hair, pale blue eyes and skin with the color and scent of cinnamon. Fire nymphs dwell on the Elemental Plane of Fire. Fire nymphs rarely visit the Material Plane, though mages are known to request their company on occasion. A fire nymph usually wears translucent robes of white or ash. Fire nymphs can all spells involving fire as 7th-level spell casters. A fire nymph’s body generates intense heat, causing opponents to take an extra 1d4 points of damage every time the creature touches the fire nymph. A fire nymph’s metallic weapons also conduct this heat.

  • Fire Nymph: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk Dagger (1d4 plus 1d4 fire) or slam (1d2 plus 1d4 fire); Move 12; Save 16; AL C or N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Heat, spells, immunity to fire, magic resistance (5%), double damage from cold

Source: Fire Nymph from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fire Phantom

Fire phantoms appear as humanoids with raging fire for hair, flame-encased fists, and elemental fire playing across their bodies. A fire phantom’s eyes are tiny balls of molten fire, as is its tongue. Fire phantoms attack with fiery fists that deal an extra 1d6 fire damage. Once every 1d4 rounds, they can hurl a globe of concentrated flame up to 30 feet (2d6 damage, save avoids). As a last resort, a fire phantom can detonate itself in an inferno that does 6d6 points of damage to all creatures within a 10-foot radius (save for half). The explosion kills the fire phantom if it fails a save, and causes its flames to extinguish for 1 round if it succeeds.

  • Fire Phantom: HD 6; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 slam (1d4 + 1d6 fire); Move 6; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Fire blast, immune to fire, immolation

Source: Fire Phantom from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fire Snake

A fire snake resembles a normal snake with reddish-orange scales and stark white eyes. They range in size from 2 feet to 6 feet in length. Fire snakes make their homes in fires and rarely journey more than 30 feet from such an open flame. A fire snake’s preferred method of attack is to hide in a nearby fire and then surprise its foes as they come nearby. A fire snake attacks by biting its opponents with its sharp fangs. A creature hit by a fire snake’s bite must succeed on a saving throw or be paralyzed for 1d6 rounds.

  • Fire Snake: HD 2; AC 2 [17]; Atk Bite (1d4 plus paralysis); Move 9/12 (climbing); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 4/60; Special: Paralysis, immune to fire, double damage from cold, surprise on a roll of 1-4 on 1d6

Source: Fire Snake from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Michael McDonagh.

Fire Whale (Burning Leviathan)

A fire whale is about 30 feet long, though specimens as long as 60 feet have been seen swimming the fiery seas. The fire whale’s body is crimson red mottled with yellow and orange spots, particularly along the back and shoulder area. The fire whale has a wide angular mouth. A fire whale attacks with its bite and tail slap. Surface creatures that threaten a fire whale are subjected to its scalding blast attack. The blast of superheated air from the whale’s blowhole to burn opponents (4d6 damage, save for half).

  • Fire Whale: HD 12; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite (3d6), tail slap (1d8); Move 18 (Swim); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Scalding blast, immune to fire

Source: Fire Whale from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Firefiend

A firefiend is a rare creature from the Elemental Plane of Fire that takes the form of a three-sided column of fire, each side sporting a single arm, leg and face. In each arm the creature carries a flaming longsword. Upon first glance, a firefiend strongly resembles a fire elemental of the same size, but beyond that the resemblance ends. Its three faces constantly scowl and scream at opponents, cursing them in the flowery language of the efreet. If an opponent understands this language, he will comprehend only incoherent babbling and cursing. Once every other round, each of the firefiend’s faces can spit a fiery cinder to a range of 10 feet at one opponent. A target takes 1 point of fire damage and must succeed on a saving throw or catch on fire. Because of their three faces, firefiends are very difficult to surprise.

  • Firefiend: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 3 longswords (1d8 plus 1d6 fire); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Spit, immunity to fire, double damage from cold

Source: Firefiend from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Fish, Giant

Giant fish can range from something barely larger than a shark to something as large as a whale. In general, these creatures will be at least 11 feet long, and will have 1HD per 2 feet of length. Thus, if rolling randomly for a giant fish, roll 1d10+10 feet to determine the length, and the hit dice will be half that number. If the roll is a “10,” (i.e., the fish would be 20 feet long) then it is a REALLY giant fish: roll 1d20 for additional feet in length. Thus, the maximum size for a giant fish is 40 feet, and for some unknown reason giant fish never seem to be exactly 20 feet in length; a matter for philosophers to puzzle upon. The truly giant fish can most likely swallow people whole on a natural roll of 18-20. Use the rules for creating monsters to determine the saving throws and experience point values of the varying sizes of giant fish. Giant fish might be intelligent (5% chance), in which case they might have an alignment other than Neutrality.

  • Ferec: HD varies; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d6 per 5 feet in length); Move varies (roll 1d4+1 x 10); Save varies; AL N (usually); CL/XP varies; Special: None (or swallow whole)

Source: Swords & Wizardry Complete Rulebook

Flail Snail

Flail snails are solitary omnivores found in the deepest recesses of caverns, caves, and dungeons. There they sustain themselves on a diet of fungus, mold, and rodents. Flail snails are massive snails, the size of warhorses. Their heads are masses of four thick tentacles, each tipped with a mace-like ball. The snail’s shell is striped in bright colors of red, blue, yellow and green, while its flesh is gray-blue. The shell of a dead flail snail can be sold on the open market for 3,000–5,000 gp. Abrupt exposure to bright light blinds flail snails for 1 round. Any time a spell targets a flail snail, there is a chance it produces a random effect rather than affecting the creature. Only spells that directly affect a flail snail are warped. Area spells are not affected by this ability. Roll 1d10 and consult the table below to determine random effects.

1d10 Result
1-2 Spell misfires; caster disoriented for 1d4 rounds and must make a saving throw to cast any spell while disoriented.
3-4 Spell misfires; creature nearest the flail snail is affected as if the spell had been cast on him.
5-7 Spell functions normally
8-9 Spell fails; nothing happens
10 Spell rebounds on caster

  • Flail Snail: HD 4; AC 1 [18]; Atk 4 slams (1d8); Move 12; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Immunity to fire and poison, light blindness, warp magic

Source: Flail Snail from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Simon Tilbroom.

Flea, Giant

Giant fleas are blood-sucking parasites that prey on warm-blooded animals. They have strong hind legs with powerful tendons that allow them to leap up to three times their Move rate. A giant flea is about a foot long, with an oval, flattened body. If a giant flea hits with a bite attack, it latches on to automatically drain the creature’s blood (1d4 points of damage) in the next round. After it drains 4 total hit points, it leaps away to digest its meal. There is a 5% chance that a giant flea carries a disease.

  • Flea, Giant: HD 5 hp; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d2 + blood drain); Move 6; Save 18; AL N; CL/XP B/10; Special: Blood drain, disease, leap

Source: Flea, Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Flenser

Flensers are undead creatures with the same appearance as ghouls, but wearing cloaks made of rotting skins, mainly those of humans – although if the flenser has not encountered humans or their kin recently, it may have resorted to adorning itself with the skins of animals. Flensers are considerably more intelligent than ghouls, and may be found leading ghoul packs.

Flensers have a 50% chance to be leading a pack of 2d6 ghouls, with a 25% chance that there are also 1d2 ghasts in the group. Like ghouls, the claws and bite of a flenser can induce paralysis, but the flenser’s paralysis is extremely powerful – the saving throw against it is made at a penalty of -4 on the saving throw, and elves are not immune to the effects. If a flenser kills a foe, it skins the corpse before eating the flesh, and adds the skin to its hideous cloak. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Flenser: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d6) and 1 bite (1d6+2); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100XP; Special: Paralysis.

Source: Monstrosities

Flind

Flinds are a race closely related to gnolls. The two races share some strong similarities, and at first sight inexperienced adventurers could easily confuse the two. Flinds are much stockier than their lanky kin, much stronger and hardier, and are certainly more dangerous. It is unknown if flinds are a subspecies of the gnoll or a genetic anomaly produced among large gnoll packs. Flinds are often found among gnoll bands acting as leaders; their strength and relatively superior intelligence puts them above their lesser brethren. Flinds speak Gnoll and about 15% of them also speak the common tongue.

A flindbar is a weapon that consists of two iron bars, approximately 18 inches in length, connected by a length of chain. With a flindbar, the wielder gains a +2 bonus on attack rolls made to disarm an enemy. Flindbars inflict 1d6 points of damage. They weigh 2 pounds and cost 4 gp.

  • Flind: HD 2 + 2; AC 1 [18]; Atk Flindbar (1d6+1); Move 12; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: none

Source: Flind from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by J.D. Morris.

Floating Eye

Floating eyes look like 6-inch long, semi-transparent fish with a single large eye located in the center of its body along its dorsal region. They are most often found underground in forgotten dungeon waterways and underground lakes and seas. The creature’s eye is capable of bioluminescence, and it has such minute control over the intensity and patterns of the light that it can mesmerize other creatures that see it. Floating eyes are part of an unusual symbiotic relationship with a variety of predatory fish, including sharks. Once the floating eye has mesmerized its prey, predatory fish move in and consume it. After they have eaten, the floating eye moves in and gorges itself on the scraps. Floating eyes are small saltwater fish that have transparent bodies and a single large eye about the size of a walnut located in the center of their body. Creatures meeting the gaze of a floating eye must succeed on a saving throw or stare blankly at the floating eye for 1d6+1 rounds. A swimming creature that fails its save does not sink, but floats on the surface of the water.

  • Floating Eye: HD 1d6; AC 3[16]; Atk Bite (1d2); Move 24 (Swim); Save 18; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Hypnotic gaze, surprise on a roll of 1-5 on 1d6

Source: Floating Eye from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Flowerchild

A flowerchild resembles a mass of flowers that can shape itself in any way it desires, from a carpet to a roughly humanoid form. It does not make any sort of physical attack, but anyone coming within 50ft of one of these plants has walked into considerable danger. The area around the flowerchild has a sweet smell that causes anyone breathing it to become utterly peaceful and uninterested in taking any action other than to sleep (a successful saving throw allows the victim to shake off this effect). The magically-induced lassitude is permanent unless the victim is brought out of the flowerchild’s scent. Once it has a helpless victim nearby, the flowerchild will release a cloud of pollen that causes a victim to make a saving throw every three rounds while exposed. If the saving throw fails, the victim becomes a planting-ground for the flowerchild seeds. The victim will begin transforming into a flowerchild, with the transformation becoming complete after 1d3+2 days. A cure disease spell will end the infection by killing the pollen.

Flowerchildren are immune to blunt weapons and piercing weapons. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Flowerchild: HD 5; AC 8 [11]; Atk None; Move 1; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600XP; Special: Peaceful feelings, pollen, immune to blunt and piercing weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Flowershroud

A flowershroud is a carpet-like floral growth, connected by a network of stems and tendrils underneath the blossoms. The tendrils allow the shroud to move slowly from place to place when it is seeking new food, for these are carnivorous plants that hunt down prey. When attacking, a flowershroud lashes out with a strand of thorned blossoms, inflicting 1d4 hit points of damage but also injecting an irritant poison that causes the victim to go into convulsions for 1d6+3 rounds, losing 1 hit point per round until the convulsions cease. Flowershrouds are immune to all but cutting weapons. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Flowershroud: HD 3; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 thorn-strand (1d4); Move 3; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120XP; Special: Convulsion poison, immnune to non-cutting weapons

Source: Monstrosities

Flumph

This small (2 feet in diameter) strange creature looks like a saucer-shaped jellyfish with many small spike-like tentacles dangling from its underbelly. Its body is milky-white in color. Two short eyestalks protrude from the top of its body. Its eyestalks are gray as are its tentacles. Its eyes are jet black. Flumphs are strange beings that spend their days floating along looking for food and water. They are non-offensive and only attack when actively hunting for food. Flumphs prefer the darkness of the underground and are rarely, if ever, encountered above ground.

A flumph that hits an opponent with its spikes injects acid into the wound, dealing 1d4 points of damage. The acid damage continues for the next 2d4 rounds. Immersion in running water or a cure light wounds spell stops the acid damage. A flumph’s nauseating spray is a 20-foot line that it can fire twice per day. A creature hit by this poison must make a saving throw or be sickened for 5 rounds. The odor from this spray lingers in the area (and on any creature hit) for 1d4 hours and can be detected to a range of 100 feet. Creatures that come within 100 feet of an affected area or creature during this time must succeed on a saving throw themselves or become sickened for 5 rounds.

A flumph is helpless if turned over (requires a successful grapple attack).

  • Flumph: HD 2; AC -1[20]; Atk Nauseating spray (sickened) or spikes (1d6 plus 1d4 acid); Move 9 (Fly); Save 16; AL L; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Acid, nauseating spray

Source: Flumph from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Ian McDowell and Douglas Naismith.

Fly, Giant

Giant flies are larger relatives of normal flies. Like their lesser cousins, they are most often found in areas of garbage, litter, and refuse. A giant fly resembles a normal fly and can grow to a length of 12 feet, though most average about 6 feet long.

  • Giant Fly: HD 3; AC 5[14]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 12/24 (Fly); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: None

Source: Giant Fly from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Flying Jellyfish, Giant

As its name suggests, the Giant Flying Jellyfish is a marine life form that has adapted to existence in the skies. It is a hazard to sky-travelers and flying creatures, as it is almost translucent and is also known to hide in clouds. The giant flying jellyfish is partially gaseous in nature, and flies by means of jetting air. The giant flying jellyfish attacks by trailing its tentacles onto the decks of ships, into the space occupied by flying opponents, or through settlements when it hunts across the ground. It can make up to 2 attacks per 10ft cubic space occupied by opponents, to a maximum of 8 attacks. Each tentacle causes 2d6 damage, and may cause paralysis lasting 1d4 days (saving throw negates). It has also evolved a distinctive defence against magic. Any spell or similar attack against it builds up a charge in the creature, if it makes its saving throw. This charge is equal to 1 point per spell level, to a maximum equal to the jellyfish’s hit dice. In any round, in addition to making tentacle attacks, the giant flying jellyfish can discharge from 1 to 4 energy charges with the following effects: (1) All spell-casting beings within 50ft suffer intense mental distress for 1d3 rounds per charge, making it impossible to cast spells during this time. (2) All creatures and vessels flying via magic within 30ft have their movement rate halved for a period of 2 rounds per charge. (3) All creatures within 10ft of the giant flying jellyfish suffer -1 to all die rolls per charge expended for 1d2 turns. If severely threatened, the giant flying jellyfish may expend a blast of 8 charges, with effects as if 4 charges had been expended, but doubling the effective ranges of the blast’s effects. This massive expenditure of power also allows the jellyfish to quadruple its flying movement rate for 4 rounds in order to escape. Most specimens are 20-40 ft. in diameter, with 40-80ft long tentacles. Larger versions, of 24 or even 32 HD, may also exist, particularly in the ethereal realities or in the voids between the moons. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts “Myrystyr”)

  • Giant Flying Jellyfish: HD 16; AC 8 [11]; Atk up to 8 tentacles (2d6+paralysis); Move 0 (fly 9); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 19/4100; Special: Discharge spell energy, paralysis.

Source: Monstrosities

Flying Squirrel, Carnivorous

These squirrels, larger than normal flying squirrels, are carnivorous. They may attack humans if provoked, enchanted, or in sufficient numbers to feel confident of success.

  • Carnivorous Giant Squirrel: HD 1d4hp; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d2); Move 6 (Glide 12); Save 18; AL N; CL/XP A/5; Special: Glide silently.

Source: Monstrosities

Flytrap Shambler

Flytrap shamblers are mobile plants about the bulk of a horse, but they shuffle along the ground on thick, tentacle-like vines. The body is leafy and sometimes blooms with orchid-like flowers; the head rises on a fibrous stalk topped with the wide mouth of a venus flytrap, which can deliver a powerful bite. It is common for them to carry a polearm or spear in their front vines, for they can use such weapons in tandem with the bite. Despite their appearance, flytrap shamblers are relatively intelligent and often posted as guards by villains with the ability to control plants. Their value in this sort of role is somewhat compromised by the fact that they cannot talk.

Flytrap shamblers are capable of seeding themselves, but are almost always found as a result of direct cultivation by powerful villains who possess the knowledge and skill to breed such vegetation. The creation of a flytrap shambler involves magic, alchemy, and the skillful cultivation of several different flowering plants, some of which are not commonly found. There are manuals and librams describing the process, but these are for the most part forgotten lore.

The leafy body of a flytrap shambler is immune to damage from piercing weapons, but cutting and bludgeoning weapons inflict normal damage. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Flytrap Shambler: HD 3; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 6; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Immune to piercing weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Fogwarden

This creature resembles a humanoid formed of fog and mist. The only discernible facial feature is its icy blue eyes. It is sometimes called an ice apparition, for much like the standard apparition, the fogwarden feeds on the fear of its victims. The fogwarden, however, is not undead. A fogwarden is usually found inhabiting the coldest and most desolate areas of the world. The fog surrounding it flashes with its life force. These flashes are often mistaken for the will-o’-wisp. The fogwarden’s natural is similar to the gaseous form spell, except that a fogwarden does not lose any abilities, can attack its foes, and has a fly speed of 15. A fogwarden radiates a 30-foot-radius fear aura. A creature in the area must succeed on a saving throw or be affected as though by a fear spell.

Electricity constantly plays across a fogwarden’s form. A creature holding a metal object that contacts the fogwarden takes 3d6 points of electricity damage (save for half damage). Once every other round, a fogwarden can loose this electricity as a stroke of lightning in a 30-foot line (save for half damage). This electrical aura of the fogwarden can animate dead creatures within 20 feet as the animate dead spell. The animated creatures resemble zombies (and use their stats) and are under the control of the fogwarden that animated them. They are not truly undead however and cannot be turned. If the fogwarden is slain or moves more than 20 feet from a zombie, the animated creature collapses dead and cannot be animated again.

Fogwardens shun sunlight. A fogwarden exposed to sunlight can take only move or attack each round, and is destroyed utterly after 1 hour of exposure if it cannot escape.

  • Fogwarden: HD 4; AC 4[15]; Atk Lightning bolt (3d6); Move 15 (Fly); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Fear aura, lightning, animate dead, +1 or better weapon to hit, gaseous form, immunities (cold, electricity, poison), vulnerable to sunlight, surprise on 1-2 on 1d6

Source: Fogwarden from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Wizards of the Coast.

Foo Dog

Foo dogs are extraplanar creatures that serve as guardians to those of the lawful alignment. They are rarely encountered on the Material Plane, but when they are, they are always in the employ of a lawful-aligned creature, acting as either a companion or guardian. A foo creature never associates with creatures of chaotic alignment. It tolerates those of neutral alignments.

This large dog has a slightly oversized head and large, bulbous eyes. Its paws end in sharp claws. Its fur is golden fading to crimson on the underside.

Foo dogs have a +2 bonus on to hit and damage rolls when fighting chaos-aligned creatures.

Once per day, by barking, a foo dog can summon 1d4 additional foo dogs with a 25% chance of success.

A foo dog is protected by an aura of goodness. A chaos-aligned creature that attacks a foo dog takes a –1 penalty on to hit and damage rolls.

A foo dog can become invisible and/or ethereal at will. A foo dog can enter the Astral Plane with up to six other creatures, provided they are all within 5 feet of the foo dog.

  • Foo Dog: HD 7; AC 0[19]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 15; Save 9; AL L; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Strike chaotics, summon foo creatures, aura, etherealness, invisibility, plane shift, magic resistance (35%)

Source: Foo Dog from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Forester’s Bane

The forester’s bane is a huge, immobile, and carnivorous shrub. Closer inspection reveals large, tough leaves radiating from its central stalk. These dark green leaves hide six purple serrated stalks inside its body. At the center of this low-growing shrub is a 3-foot diameter yellowish orb from which sprout many small green branches. Each branch has small, sweet smelling (and tasting) berries of various colors growing from it.

When a living creature moves near a forester’s bane’s leaves, it attempts to grab the creature. Trapped creatures are subjected to attacks by 1-6 serrated stalks that slash and cut until the opponent escapes. Trapped victims are attacked at a +2 bonus. The forester’s bane releases a trapped victim when either it or the victim is dead, or the leaf holding the victim is destroyed. Because of its four leaves, it can grapple up to four different opponents at one time. Both leaves and stalks each have 10 hit points and can be attacked. Severing a leaf or stalk deals no damage to a forester’s bane. Attacks that hit a leaf deal half their damage to the monster and half to the trapped victim. Destroyed leaves and stalks grow back in 2d4 weeks if the forester’s bane is not killed.

  • Forester’s Bane: HD 5; AC 2[17]; Atk 6 stalks (1d6); Move 0; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Engulf

Source: Forester’s Bane from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Forgotten One

A forgotten one is a foot-tall fey with pointed ears, slanted eyes, and long, nimble limbs. Most forgotten ones weave twigs and leaves into their hair for decoration and to help conceal themselves in the treetops. Three time per day, a forgotten one can cause any creature within 20 feet to forget meeting the fey (save resists).

  • Fogotten One: HD 3; AC 3[16]; Atk 1 weapon (1d3); Move 3; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Forgetful presence

Source: Forgotten One from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Forlarren

The powers of a nymph are such that she can enchant and seduce nearly any creature that has the capacity to know beauty. Some say that even the great and terrible daemons are not immune to a nypmh’s charms. The forlarren, they say, is the proof. The forlarren is a lonely creature that feels cursed by its own existence. They look like hairless satyrs, a small ruff of dark hair covering the back of its head, small horns protruding above its eyes and a twisted, leering visage upon its face. They detest themselves and everything they see, consumed by hatred of life itself. Such is their rage that they seek to vent their ire on law and chaos alike. Forlarrens speak their own language and some actually speak the common tongue or the language of nymphs and dryads.

The forlarren attacks with its fists, using them to pummel an opponent. It focuses on a single opponent in combat and attacks until it or its opponent is slain. If a forlarren succeeds in killing an opponent, the kindly traits of its fey mother surface and it shows profound remorse. It ceases combat, if possible, or flees if other opponents insist on continuing the fight. Should its opponents allow combat to end, the forlarren may offer its solace to the surviving companions amid wails and sobs. After a few days, however, the dominant evil nature of its fiendish father resurfaces and the forlarren once more attacks all creatures on sight—including those it had previously befriended.

Once per day, by making a melee touch attack, a forlarren can heat metal (as the druid spell). Once the affected metal reaches the searing stage, it remains at that stage until the forlarren breaks contact with the affected metal. Once contact is broken, the metal slowly returns to its normal temperature (reducing the effects each round just as the heat metal spell).

  • Forlarren: HD 3; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 strikes (1d4); Move 12; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Heat Metal

Source: Forlarren from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Ian Livingstone.

Formian

Formians are highly intelligent ant-people, walking on their four hind legs but using their specialized fore-claws to hold objects. Their ant-like heads have deadly mandibles, which they use in combat. Formians have a caste society, like ants. The workers are small (about 75 pounds) and fairly stupid. Warriors are as large as a human being, and no more intelligent than the workers. A noble class, the taskmasters, rules formian society and are normally only found in the cities of this strange and alien race. These formians are as large as a horse, and extremely intelligent.

Formian cities are small, containing no more than 500 workers, 50 warriors, and 10 taskmasters, plus a royal retinue. The royal retinue includes a queen, males equal to half the number of taskmasters, and an additional 1d6 taskmasters, 3d6 warriors, and 6d6 workers. Formians also keep humans and members of other races as slaves or trade-goods.

  • Formian Worker: HD 1; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 15; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.
  • Formian Warrior: HD 3; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 bite (1d6), 2 mandibles (1d4), 1 sting (1 + non-lethal poison); Move 12; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Non-lethal poison sting (2d4 damage, save for half).
  • Formian Taskmaster: HD 7; AC 1 [18]; Atk 1 bite (1d6+1), 1 sting (1d2 + non-lethal poison); Move 12; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Non-lethal poison (4d4 damage, save for half).
  • Formian Male: HD 8; AC 1 [18]; Atk 1 bite (1d6+1), 1 sting (1d2 + non-lethal poison); Move 12; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Non-lethal poison (4d4 damage, save for half).
  • Formian Queen: Noncombatant, HD 10, AC 3 [16]; Atk None; Move 6; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP noncombatant; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Fox Monk

The Fox Monk is a short fox-like humanoid, garbed in a shabby, quilted robe and bearing only a begging bowl and walking stick. Fox monks have taken vows of poverty and transience; they rely upon charity for food and somewhere to sleep, never staying in one area for more than a few days. They may defend themselves with a bite (1d4 damage), or in unarmed combat. A fox monk’s strike causes the target’s nervous system to spasm, causing him to drop any items held and move at half normal speed for 1d4 rounds (saving throw negates). Fox monks may also forego all attacks to perform dodging leaps, causing enemies to attack at -3 to hit. Lastly, a fox monk can cast Protection from Evil and Purify Food and Drink once per day. Despite their vows, these pious beggars are considered troublemakers by most civilized folk. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Fox Monk: HD 2+3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d4) or 1 strike (1d3 + spasms); Move 15; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Spells, monkish strike.

Source: Monstrosities

Frog

Frog, Giant

Giant frogs range in size from two or three feet long (a “small” giant frog), up to massive specimens of eight feet long (a “large” giant frog). In between are the “medium” giant frogs, five to six feet long. Large giant frogs can swallow opponents whole on a natural attack roll of 20. All giant frogs can make a 100ft leap that reaches a height of 20ft. Small giant frogs increase this length to 150ft. If an opponent is swallowed whole, he dies in three rounds. To escape, the victim cannot attack normally, and must have a bladed weapon to even attempt cutting his way out of the frog. An attack roll of 18 or better, including any modifiers, indicates that the victim cuts his way out of the frog, slaying the beast in the process. Attacks on the giant frog have a chance to damage a swallowed creature. Giant frogs can use their tongues to grab prey and haul them to the frog’s mouth; anyone grabbed in this way takes no damage until the frog begins to bite it in the following round, hitting automatically and inflicting maximum damage on that one attack. A group of giant frogs will generally be evenly mixed among the three sizes (roll 1d3 for hit dice on each frog in the encounter).

  • Giant Frog (small): HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d3); Move 3 (or 150 ft. leap); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Leap.
  • Giant Frog (medium): HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 3 (or 100 ft. leap); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Leap.
  • Giant Frog (large): HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 3 (or 100 ft. leap); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Leap, swallow whole.

Source: Monstrosities

Frog, Giant Abyssal Dire

Abyssal dire frogs come from the Plane of Slime and are wholly chaotic. They have a demonic aspect to them, with a spiny and usually poisonous hide of blackish-green. Their red eyes flicker with demonic intelligence. They speak the language of demons. Abyssal dire frogs are about 12 feet long. Once per day, an abyssal dire frog can make a normal attack against a lawful foe to deal additional damage equal to the frog’s total Hit Dice.

An Abyssal Dire Frog’s tongue can be attacked. Damage dealt to the tongue is not dealt to the frog itself. If successful, the frog does not attempt a tongue attack against that opponent for the remaindof the combat. An Abyssal Dire frog’s tongue has an AC of 4[15]

  • Giant Abyssal Dire Frog: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk Tongue (grapple), bite (2d6); Move 12/15 (Swim); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Leap, smite law, swallow whole, +1 or better weapon to hit, magic resistance (10%) resistance to cold and fire (50%)

Giant Abyssal Dire Frog from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Frog, Giant, Killer

About three feet long, giant killer frogs are the product of mad breeding experiments. They have claws and teeth, and attack relentlessly.

  • Giant Killer Frog: HD 1+4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d2), 1 bite (1d4+1); Move 3 (leap 15); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Leap.

Source: Monstrosities

Froghemoth

This gigantic creature resembles a giant frog with 4 large tentacles in place of its front legs. A single eyestalk juts from the top of its head. Its underbelly is yellow, its body is green, and its tentacles and legs are mottled green. The froghemoth is a weird aberration that swells in marshes and swamps. Its tongue is 10 feet long and it uses it to capture its prey. The froghemoth is a carnivore and feeds on various swamp-dwellers.

The victim of a froghemoth’s tentacle attacks must pass a saving throw or be held fast and pulled to the mouth for a bite attack. Victims of a bite attack must likewise pass a saving throw or be swallowed whole. Once inside the beast’s belly, a creature suffers 3d8 points of damage per round. A swallowed creature can attempt climb to climb into the beast’s mouth, where it must make a successful open doors roll to escape. A swallowed creature can also cut its way out using a dagger to deal 20 points of damage to the froghemoth’s stomach (AC 6 [13]). A froghemoth’s stomach can hold 1 human or elf or 2 dwarves or halflings.

The froghemoth takes no damage from electricity, but is instead slowed for one round (per the reverse of the haste spell).

  • Froghemoth: HD 16; AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 tentacles (1d6), tongue (1d6), bite (4d6); Move 9/12 (Swim); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 18/3800; Special: Swallow, resistance to fire (50%), slowed by electricity, surprise on roll of 1-2 on 1d6

Source: Froghemoth from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Froglum

In ages past, some mad experimenter created a golem from frog-flesh: the ancestor of all froglums. Some frog genes, however, can switch genders and even produce hermaphrodites. The ancestor of froglums was likely the first (and probably the only) self-breeding golem. Froglums are huge bipeds virtually identical to their shared ancestor: eight feet tall with slimy green skin, webbed feet, and great frog-like eyes. Their legs resemble those of frogs, but are much shorter and allow the froglum to stand upright. These creatures are soulless, having been bred from an unnatural and artificial origin. They have no detectable thoughts. In general, they serve any chaotic master, especially one who resembles a frog or a powerful wizard. They are seldom found acting on their own volition, for it is in their nature to follow a powerful master. A froglum’s slimy skin makes it resistant to fire (half damage). (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Froglum: HD 8; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 fists (2d6); Move 12; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: half damage from any fire.

Source: Monstrosities

Frost Man

Frost men are hunters that make their home in the cold regions of the world. They appear to be brutish humans dressed in animal skins and furs and wearing a patch over one eye. Each carries his personal belongings in small sacks and takes them wherever he goes. A frost man’s body radiates cold out to 30 feet, though not enough to deal damage. Frost men are only ever encountered as lone males. Perhaps there are villages somewhere with women and children, perhaps frost men are spawned from the freezing waste itself. Tribes that are aware of frost men fear them greatly for their deadly talent and refer to them as “ice demons. Frost men speak their own language and the common tongue. Three times per day, a frost man can release a blast of freezing mist in a 30-foot cone from the eye underneath its eye patch. A creature in the area takes 3d6 points of cold damage (saving throw for half).

  • Frost Man: HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk Weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Ice blast, immunity to cold, double damage from fire

Source: Frost Man from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Julian Lawrence.

Fulgurate Mushrooms

Fulgurate mushrooms appear as normal mushrooms with faint blue stems and either bluish-white caps or sapphire blue caps. A typical patch covers a 10-foot area. When touched, the mushrooms send out a burst of lightning that deals 2d6 points of damage (save for half) to any creature within 10 feet of the patch. Fulgurate mushrooms are instantly destroyed when they release their lightning blast.

  • Fulgurate Mushrooms: HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk lightning blast (2d6); Move 0; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: lightning blast

Source: Fulgurate Murshrooms from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fungal Creeper

The Fungal Creeper is a patch of fungus growing upon a boulder or wall, which often appears weathered and strangely corroded. The name comes from its ability to creep along the wall, moving about to follow living creatures. Fungal creepers draw sustenance from minerals found in rock and stone, but supplement their diets with fresh blood. The fungal creeper can sense the warmth of life within 60ft, and reacts by moving closer. It attacks by sinking tiny root-like appendages into exposed flesh, latching on to cause continuous damage if the attack roll is a 19 or 20. It may be distracted by fresh meat, whether in the form of rations no more than 1 day old or the body of an unconscious combatant. They are scavengers, and will move to feed off carrion as soon as it is detected. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Fungal Creeper: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 touch (1d6); Move 3; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Attaches on 19 or 20.

Source: Monstrosities

Fungi, Violet

Violet fungi are large mushrooms with tentacle-like growths at the base. The tentacles are not long, averaging about 2-3ft. A hit from a tentacle causes flesh to rot (saving throw applies) unless a cure disease spell is cast upon the afflicted area.

  • Violet Fungus: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 4 tendrils (rot); Move 1; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Tendrils cause rot.

Source: Monstrosities

Fungoid

A fungoid resembles a 6-foot-tall, stocky and powerful humanoid formed of mushroom flesh. Coloration varies from brownish-green or brown to dark green mottled with brown splotches. It weighs about 300 pounds. A fungoid’s facial features are discernible, but rough. Its arms end in powerful hands. Fungoids rush into combat swinging their powerful fists. They take half damage from electricity and are immune to charms.

  • Fungoid: HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 slams (1d8); Move 6; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Resists electricity, immune to charm

Source: Fungoid from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Furious Fountain

A furious fountain resembles a large anthropomorphic stone fountain, usually spraying a jet of water from its mouth. These creatures are similar to golems, but the animating spirit within is an imprisoned water elemental.

When standing still, a furious fountain is indistinguishable from any ordinary fountain. A furious fountain may attack with its stony fist, or with a jet of water. The animate fountain can spew out a violent stream of water at a range of 200ft, three times per day. The target suffers 3d10 points of damage, and is pushed back the full remaining distance of the jet’s range (a successful save halves both the damage and the distance pushed back). A second saving throw allows the victim to remain standing and avoid dropping any items held in hand. Like golems, furious fountains are unaffected by non-magical weapons. These magical creatures can only be affected by spells that specifically target water or stone, with appropriate results to be determined by the referee. As a guideline, the fountain will lose, at most, 4d10 hit points from such spells; Part Water would be an example of a spell that might inflict such damage. (Author: Skathros)

  • Furious Fountain: HD 15 (60hp); AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 fist (3d8) or water jet; Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 18/3800; Special: Immune to non-magical weapons, immune to most magic, water jet.

Source: Monstrosities

Fye

A fye resembles a translucent humanoid whose face is contorted and twisted as if frozen in an eternal scream. The fye is about 6 feet tall, and its lower torso tapers off around the knees into vaporous nothingness. Its face always has the appearance that the creature is screaming or howling though it never utters any sound. A fye continually emanates an aura of despair in a 10-foot radius that causes creatures to suffer a -2 penalty on attacks and saves (save resists). Once per round, a fye can attempt to possess an opponent with a successful touch attack (as per the magic jar spell, except it doesn’t require a receptacle). At will, a fye can cast ESP; three times per day it can cast cause fear; and once per day it can cast feeblemind.

  • Fye: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk Incorporeal touch (1d6 + possession); Move 24 (Fly); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Aura of despair, possession, magical abilities

Source: Fye from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fyr

A fyr is a 3-foot tall, goat-headed humanoid with large slightly-backward-curved horns, goat-like legs, a small bushy tail, and a human torso. Its entire body, except its arms and hands, is covered in thick brown fur. Fyrs often adorn their body with rings, necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and other such trinkets. A fyr attacks by butting with its horns, but some use weapons. A fyr can use various spell-like abilities: at will—speak with animals; 4/day—charm monster; 3/day—warp wood; 1/day—plant doorway.

  • Fyr: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk head butt (1d4+1) or 1 weapon (1d6+1); Move 6; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Spell-like abilities

Source: Fyr from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

G

Gallows Tree

A gallows tree is a 20-foot-tall tree with 6 or more humanoids hanging from its branches, each tightly secured by their necks with greenish-brown ropes. The gallows tree’s canopy is thick and bushy, and its trunk is formed of leathery bark, mottled brown. Gallows trees sustain themselves on the internal organs and body fluids of living creatures. Gallows trees lower zombies to the ground when prey comes within 100 feet of the tree. Foes that get within 15 feet are struck by the tree’s sharp branches. If two or more branches hit the same opponent, he is held and takes 2d6 points of damage automatically each round as the tree pummels him. The tree slices open victims for their organs, then fills them with a greenish sap that turns them into gallows tree zombies. The newly created undead rises in 1d4 days. A typical gallows tree has 6-11 gallows tree zombies hanging from it at any given time.

  • Gallows Tree: HD 12; AC 0 [19]; Atk 6 slams (2d6); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Create gallows tree zombies, grab, +1 magic weapons to hit, resists fire

Source: Gallows Tree from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gallows Tree Zombie

Gallows tree zombies are humanoid creatures with deathly gray-green skin that feels coarse and rough to the touch. Their clothes are tattered and torn, and some still wear the armor they wore in life (though it is now rusted, dented, or damaged). Many have small plants, weeds, or fungi growing on or from their bodies. A long, sinewy cord of greenish-brown wraps around the zombie’s throat and connects it to a gallows tree. Gallows tree zombies hang motionless from the tree that created them, being lowered to the ground only when a living creature comes within 100 feet of the gallows tree they are connected to. Once every 1d4 rounds but no more than 3 times per day, a gallows tree zombie can breathe a cloud of poisonous spores. Anyone caught in the spore cloud must make a save or be slowed (as per the slow spell). Gallows trees zombies regenerate 2 hit points per round as long as they remain connected to their tree by their tether-vine. The vine allows the zombie to move up to 100 feet away from the tree.

  • Gallows Tree Zombie: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 slams (1d6); Move 9; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Spore cloud, tether-vine, regenerate 2 hp/round

Source: Gallows Tree Zombie from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gambado

A gambado makes its lair in a 6-foot deep pit. It hides its body with rocks, leaves and anything else in the surrounding area, allowing only its head to be seen. Beneath the leaves, the gambado is a human-sized creature with a cylindrical torso. Two long arms ending in razor-sharp claws protrude from the body. Its torso ends in three long, single-toed feet. Its body is gray in color and leathery and can be compressed like a spring. This is its primary means of locomotion. By compressing its body, the gambado can spring up or forward.

Gambado are solitary creatures by nature, and on the rare occasion that more than one is encountered, each will have its own lair and pit from which it attacks. The pits are usually close together to maximize their attacks on creatures within the area. Any treasure collected by a gambado is stored on its pit floor or in a small and well-hidden hole in the side of its pit. It is unknown whether gambados can communicate or speak any languages.

  • Gambado: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk Bite (1d8), 2 claws (1d4); Move 15; Save 13; AL N (C Tendencies); CL/XP 4/120; Special: Surprise on roll of 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Gambado from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Simon Shaw.

Gargoyle

Gargoyles are winged beings resembling the carven monstrosities that bedeck the walls of cathedrals and many subterranean dungeons. They are terribly vicious predators.

  • Gargoyle: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d4), 1 horn (1d6); Move 9 (Fly 15); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Fly, magic weapon required to hit.

Source: Monstrosities

Gargoyle, Four-Armed

Four-armed gargoyles have a great fondness for inflicting pain on their foes. When a four-armed gargoyle has the upper hand in battle, it often draws out the conflict as long as it can in order to deal as much pain and suffering as it can on its foes.

  • Four-Armed Gargoyle: HD 4+1; AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 claws (1d4), bite (1d6), gore 1d6); Move 15/24 (Flying); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: +1 or better weapon to hit, freeze

Source: Four-Armed Gargoyle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Gargoyle, Fungus

A fungus gargoyle stands about 6 feet tall and weighs up to 200 pounds and looks like it is carved from molds, fungi and mushrooms. Every 1d4 rounds, a fungus gargoyles can breathe a 30-foot cone of fungus particles that causes 1d6 points of damage to any opponent who inhales the substance (a successful saving throw keeps the fungi particles from taking root in the windpipe). A fungus gargoyle also exudes a horrible stench in a 10-foot-wide cloud around it that causes those who get too near it to spend the next round retching if they fail a saving throw.

  • Fungus Gargoyle: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 15/24 (Flying); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: fungus breath, stench

Source: Fungus Gargoyle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Gargoyle, Green Guardian

Green guardian gargoyles are carved of a strange green stone and have two eyes of jet (500 gp each). The eyes radiate magic and evil if detected. If a green guardian gargoyle hits an opponent with both claw attacks, that opponent must succeed on a saving throw or be held for 4 rounds as if by a hold person spell. Unlike the hold person spell, a held creature does not receive a new save each round to break the effects. A green guardian gargoyle that has been killed reanimates in 1d8+2 days at full strength unless its eye gems are crushed and disenchanted with both dispel magic and remove curse.

  • Green Guardian Gargoyle: HD 4+1; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), bite (1d6), gore (1d6); Move 15/24 (Flying); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: +1 or better weapon to hit, freeze, hold, reanimation

Source: Green Guardian Gargoyle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Gargoyle, Maggog

Maggogs are bat-winged gargoyles. They can utilize magic as a 5th level magic-user (4/2/1). Typically they are found deep in the bowels of the earth. Maggogs are related to demons, but aren’t guardians of the underworld. Their terrible claws can inflict damage, along with a barbed tail, which is used as a stinger. (Author: Old Crawler)

  • Maggog: HD 5+1; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6) and 1 sting (1d8); Move 12 (Fly 18); Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Spell use.

Source: Monstrosities

Gargoyle, Margoyle

A margoyle is a slightly larger version of the standard gargoyle. It is meaner, more wicked, and deadlier than its smaller kin. Margoyles are most often encountered in subterranean regions and often have a pack of gargoyles with them. In such cases, the margoyle is looked upon as the master or leader of the group.

  • Margoyle: HD 6+1; AC 1 [18]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), bite (1d6), gore (1d6); Move 15/24 (Flying); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: +1 or better weapon to hit, freeze

Source: Margoyle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Gas Spore (1)

From a distance greater than 10 feet, the gas spore is likely to be mistaken for a beholder (1 in 6 chance to notice the difference). T The gas spore has a fly speed of 10 feet with average maneuverability.

When a gas spore contacts a living creature (or a living creature touches a gas spore unarmed or with natural attacks), it injects poisonous rhizomes into the foe if that opponent fails a saving throw. Each day thereafter, an infected creature must succeed on a saving throw (-1 cumulative penalty per day) or take 1d6 points of damage. Damage continues until the victim dies or the rhizomes are destroyed. At 0 hit points, a victim dies and 2d4 gas spores emerge from its body. A cure disease spell cast on an affected creature before it dies destroys the rhizomes and prevents any further damage.

If a gas spore is struck for a single point of damage (by a weapon, natural attack, spell, or effect), it explodes in a violent blast of gas that deals 6d6 points of damage to all creatures within a 30-foot radius. A successful saving throw reduces the damage by half.

Source: Gas Spore from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Gas Spore (2)

The gas spore is a spherical, chitin-armored sac containing fungus spores, about five feet in diameter, with some moving tendrils growing from the top of the sphere. The sac contains lighter-than-air gases which allow it to float in the air, and it can move by expelling some of these gases in a form of jet-propulsion. When it is near any warm-blooded creatures, it will move toward them by instinct: these creatures are completely non-intelligent.

If a gas spore gets close enough to touch a living creature, it will inject spores into the target with a successful to-hit roll. If the victim fails a saving throw, these spores will bloat and transform the host into 1d6+1 new gas spores within 24 hours unless a cure disease spell is used to prevent this (rather disgusting) transformation.

Moreover, when a gas spore is killed (and it is designed by nature to burst easily), it explodes in a radius of 20ft, inflicting 6d6 points of damage in that area (half damage with a successful saving throw). The body of anyone killed by the blast will also begin transforming into new gas spores.

  • Gas Spore: HD 1d4 hp; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 touch (disease); Move 0 (Fly 3); Save 18; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Causes disease, explodes, attacks as 3HD monster.

Source: Monstrosities

Gelatinous Cube

Gelatinous cubes are semi-transparent cubes that slosh through subterranean passages, engulfing debris and carrion to digest. Their entire substance is acidic; if the cube hits successfully, the victim must make a saving throw or become paralyzed (6 turns) for the cube to devour. Most gelatinous cubes contain various metallic treasures or gems that they have engulfed but not yet digested.

  • Gelatinous Cube: HD 4; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 (2d4); Move 6; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Paralysis, immune to lightning and cold.

Source: Monstrosities

Gelid Beetle, Greater

Greater gelid beetles are larger, meaner versions of the standard gelid beetle. They are almost always hungry and are usually encountered while hunting. Gelid beetles bite opponents, delivering cold damage with each hit. Once per minute, a gelid beetle can emit a cloud of ice cold vapors in a 20-foot radius around its body that deals 2d6 cold damage (save for half) to creatures caught within it. The cloud lasts for 1d4+3 rounds.

  • Greater Gelid Beetle: HD 12; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 bite (1d6 + 1d8 cold); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Cold, cold cloud, immune to cold

Source: Greater Gelid Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gelid Beetle, Lesser

Gelid beetles appear as stark white beetles with silvery-black legs and dull silver mandibles. Some specimens have a mottled silver or black carapace and an even rarer species has dull crimson wing covers. Gelid beetles have two sets of eyes equally spaced on their heads dull silvery-black in color. Gelid beetles bite opponents, delivering cold damage with each hit. Once per day, a gelid beetle can release a spray in a 10-foot cone that deals 2d4 cold damage (save for half).

  • Lesser Gelid Beetle: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d4 + 1d4 cold); Move 15; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Cold, cold spray, immune to cold

Source: Lesser Gelid Beetle from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Genie

Genie, Abasheen

An abasheen stands about 8 feet tall and is always dressed in flowing robes colored to denote their current station. Their skin is dark and their build powerful. All have dark hair, either black or brown, and most wear their hair braided or pulled into a ponytail, tied with ribbons of gold or silver. They are akin to genie nobility and act the part. Abasheens slam opponents with their powerful fists and employ their spell-like abilities in combat: at will—charm person; 1/day—quest. An abasheen can turn itself into a whirlwind much like an air elemental, sweeping away creatures with one or fewer hit dice (the diameter of the whirlwind is 20 ft.)

  • Abasheen: HD 8; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 slams (1d10+1); Move 9/24 (Flying); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Spell-like abilities, whirlwind

Genie, Abasheen from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Lance and Travis Hawvermale.

Genie, Hawanar

Hawanar are 12-feet-tall genies whose lower torsos are shrouded in a cyclone of flame. A hawanar can create food and water as well as wooden and cloth objects. They can create metal objects (including coins), but all such magically created metals disappear in time. Hawanar can become invisible at will and can create realistic illusions that disappear when touched. Finally, a hawanar can turn into a flaming whirlwind that sweeps away creatures with one or fewer hit dice and deals 1d6 points of fire damage. (The diameter of the whirlwind is 10 feet.) Some hawanars can grant true wishes. A hawanar’s attacks cause flammable materials to burst into flame.

  • Hawanar: HD 11; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 fists (1d8 + fire); Move 10/16 (Flying); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Magical abilities, immune to fire, fiery cyclone

Source: Genie, Hawanar from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Lance and Travis Hawvermale.

Genie, Marid

A marid is a blue genie standing about 16 feet tall and weighing nearly 2,500 pounds. These powerful beings can transform into a maelstrom in water to carry creatures and objects away. This watery cyclone overturns small boats and sinks larger vessels in 1d4+4 rounds. Marids also can rise out of the ocean to attack ships, and will batter vessels to pieces within 1 hour if not prevented or distracted. A marid can turn invisible, polymorph self, create water and control water at will. Some marids can grant limited wishes.

  • Marid: HD 11; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 fists (1d8); Move 10/16 (Swimming); Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Magical abilities, whirlpool

Source: Genie, Marid from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Geon

A geon appears as a large, boulder-like creature, though similar in a way to xorn. They have two large legs and feet, which also act as hands, allowing the geon to manipulate items with them. Two large recesses on its surface function as eyes. A geon has a large, wide mouth. Geons animate boulders to attack its foes and create walls of stone to contain them. The geon can animate any rocks within 180 feet at will, and can control up to two rocks at a time. Boulders (Move 6) fight as geons in all respects. Geons can: 1/day–move earth, passwall, transmute rock to mud, wall of stone. Geons are vulnerable to cold and take one-and-a-half damage. They take half damage (or none if they save) from fire and electricity.

  • Geon: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 slams (2d8+2); Move 6; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Animate boulders, spell-like abilities, vulnerable to cold, immune to fire and electricity

Source: Geon from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Clark Peterson.

Ghast

Ghasts are highly intelligent ghouls. Their charnel stench is so powerful that anyone nearby (about 10ft) must make a saving throw or suffer a –2 penalty on attack rolls. As with ghouls, a hit from a ghast causes paralysis if the victim fails a saving throw.

  • Ghast: HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d6); Move 15; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Stench, paralyzing touch.

Source: Monstrosities

Ghost

There are innumerable types of ghosts with varying qualities, often depending on the nature and circumstances under which the person died. One example follows.

Ghost, Strangling

These apparitions are similar to banshees, but instead of screeching they can attack only a single opponent at a time, strangling the victim with insubstantial hands. If the attack hits, the victim must make a saving throw or die within 1d4+1 rounds. A remove curse spell will break the creature’s hold during this time period. Protection from evil spells will hold these creatures at bay. Anyone strangled by a strangling ghost will rise as a strangling ghost within 1d6 days. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Strangling Ghost: HD 5; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 strangulation (save or die in 14+1 rounds); Move (Fly 12); Save 12; AL usually C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Magic Resistance (50%), magic or silver weapon required to hit, strangles (if hit, save or die in 1d4+1 rounds).

Source: Monstrosities

Ghoul

Ghouls are pack-hunting undead corpse eaters. They are immune, like most undead, to charms and sleep spells. The most dangerous feature of these horrid, cunning creatures is their paralyzing touch: any hit from a ghoul requires a saving throw or the victim becomes paralyzed for 3d6 turns.

  • Ghoul: HD 2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d4); Move 9; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Immunities, paralyzing touch.

Source: Monstrosities

Ghoul, Ao-Nyobo (Blue Wife)

This female ghoul-creature can be found lurking in the ruins of old castles. They resemble old, courtly ladies with blue skin, blackened teeth, and no eyebrows. As with ghouls and ghasts, a hit from the Ao-nyobo causes paralysis if the victim fails a saving throw. The Ao-nyobo is capable of flight and prefers to ambush victims from above – often hiding in the rafters of half-ruined buildings to swoop down upon the unsuspecting. In the outdoors, an Ao-nyobo will often chase down any escaped prey in a relentless, airborne hunt. Ao-nyobo are turned as ghasts. (Author: Mike Davison)

  • Ao-nyobo: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), 1 bite (1d6); Move 14 (fly 9); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Paralyzing touch.

Source: Monstrosities

Ghoul, Cinder

A cinder ghoul is ghost-like spirit in the form of a swirling humanoid cloud of burning ash and charred body parts. Its dark, smoky shape is lit here and there with the red glow of perpetually burning embers, and the grisly remains of scorched body parts can occasionally be glimpsed floating within the mass. These baleful undead creatures reek of smoke and burnt flesh. A cinder ghoul’s touch drains 1 level. Any creature struck by the ghoul’s vicious touch also suffers 1d6 fire damage and must save or catch on fire.

  • Cinder Ghoul: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 slam (1d8 + 1d6 fire + level rain); Move 12 (flying); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Drains 1 level with hit, fire

Source: Cinder Ghoul from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Ghoul, Crimson

Crimson ghouls are created by strange and terrible magical procedures worked by necromancers upon a normal ghoul. They are not ordinarily found in the wild, as regular ghouls are, although from time to time a pack of crimson ghouls might outlive or escape from their masters. In this case, the crimson ghouls will be found in the same sorts of desolate or cursed spots as normal ghouls, even competing with them for the horrid, charnel foods they crave. As with normal ghouls, the touch of a crimson ghoul causes paralysis for 3d6 turns unless the victim makes a saving throw.

As one might expect from the name, crimson ghouls have hides the color of blood. They otherwise resemble normal ghouls, although they are stronger and have a more powerful bite. In addition to the skin color and a more robust physical frame than their ghoulish brethren, crimson ghouls have another signal distinction from a normal ghoul, which is that normal weapons only inflict half damage against them. Magical weapons inflict full damage. Moreover, crimson ghouls are somewhat resistant to spells: they gain a +1 bonus on saving throws against any spell. As with most undead, they are immune to sleep spells, but they can be affected by a charm person or a charm monster spell (although the duration of the charm is extremely short, not lasting more than 1d6 rounds). This strange vulnerability seems to be the result of the necromantic procedures by which they are prepared, a by-product of being created as loyal servants to their necromantic masters. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Crimson Ghoul: HD 4; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d6); Move 9; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Half damage from non-magic weapons, +1 save vs. spells, paralysis.

Source: Monstrosities

Ghoul, Dust

Dust ghouls are dust-covered creatures with decaying flesh pulled tightly over their humanoid frames. Their teeth are pointed fangs and their hands end in wicked, dirt-covered and blood-soaked claws. Once per round, a dust ghoul can emit a hellish shriek that paralyzes any creature within 60 feet for 2d4 rounds if they fail a save. Once per day, a dust ghoul can animate 11d4 dust zombies. These zombies cannot be harmed by spells or weapons, but a gallon of water destroys them. The dust zombies attack with the ghouls to-hit bonus, but do no damage. If two hit the same opponent, they hold the creature immobile. Dust ghouls are immune to charms and sleep spells.

  • Dust Ghoul: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), 1 bite (1d4); Move 10/6/4 (flying/burrowing); Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Animate dust, paralyzing shriek

Source: Dust Ghoul from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Casey Christofferson.

Ghoul-Stirge

A ghoul-stirge resembles a large stirge with rotting flesh and broken wings. The origin of the ghoul-stirge has been lost, but it is believed to be the result of a failed magical experiment conducted in ages past by a group of evil and insane necromancers. Though they can generally be encountered anywhere, ghoul-stirges seem to favor desolate places such as ruins and caverns or dungeons deep underground. Being undead they do not have to eat, but seem to draw sustenance from the blood of enemies, much like a vampire.

Those hit by a ghoul-stirge’s bite attack must succeed on a saving throw or be paralyzed for 1d6+2 rounds. A ghoul-stirge can drain blood from a paralyzed or pinned opponent. Each round it deals 2d4 points of damage each round. Once the ghoul-stirge has dealt 8 points of damage, it flies off to digest its meal. If its victim dies before the ghoul-stirge’s appetite has been sated, the creature detaches and seeks a new target.

  • Ghoul-Stirge: HD 4+1; AC 4 [15]; Atk Bite (1d6 plus parlaysis); Move 9/18 (flying); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Blood drain, paralysis

Source: Ghoul-Stirge from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and and Clark Peterson, based on original material by Lenard Lakofka.

Giants

Giants are a staple of fantasy gaming, huge and dangerous creatures that often have a taste for human flesh. Most are not particularly intelligent.

Bronze Giant

A bronze giant is huge muscular being often mistaken for a statue of the gods. It is well proportioned and has flesh that gleams like polished bronze and hair the color of copper wire. Bronze giants stand about 25 feet tall and weigh about 14,000 pounds. A bronze giant can unleash a bellowing laugh that strikes fear (save negates) into the hearts of any creature within 100 feet that hears it. They throw rocks for 6d6 points of damage.

  • Bronzer Giant: HD 12+1d6 hp; AC 1 [18]; Atk Sword (6d6); Move 15; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: hurl boulders, sardonic laugh

Source: Bronze Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Casey Christofferson.

Cave Giant

Cave giants are the dumber, stronger cousins of hill giants. A cave giant is a massive creature, stocky and pot-bellied, with black scraggly hair streaming down over its shoulders. The skin of a cave giant is gray, mottled here and there with blotches of brown and black. The face of a cave giant has a bulbous nose between glaring eyes with thick, bushy eyebrows. A cave giant has two tusk-like teeth that extend down over its lower lip, causing it to drool almost constantly. Cave giants don’t throw rocks, but instead try to grab victims and pound them into the ground, ceiling or any nearby objects.

  • Cave Giant: HD 9+1d6 hp; AC 4 [15]; Atk weapon (2d8) or slam (1d8); Move 12; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: none

Cave Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Erica Balsley.

Cloud Giant

Cloud giants are cunning beasts, often living in cloud-castles in the sky (hence their name). They throw rocks for 6d6 hit points of damage. Cloud giants are famous for their ability to smell out food, enemies, and Englishmen.

  • Cloud Giant: HD 12+1d4 hp; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 weapon (6d6); Move 15; Save 3; AL usually C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Hurl boulders.

Source: Monstrosities

Daimyo Giant

Daimyo Giants are perhaps improperly named: the term “Daimyo” is ordinarily used as a title, whereas the daimyo giants are a particular sub-race in their own right. However, they are so often found leading groups of other giants (and ogres, as seen below) that the use of the title fits them well. They tend to attract followings of other giant-type creatures, for their charisma – to giant and ogre races only – is always treated as 18 regardless of the giant’s true charisma as it would affect members of other races. Storm giants and titans are the exception to this rule; they not only do not find daimyo giants to be more than normally charismatic, but consider them to be irritatingly arrogant. Daimyo giants, for their part, avoid territories claimed by a storm giant or a titan, although with enough followers a daimyo giant might very well attempt to kill a storm giant.

Daimyo giants are slightly shorter but more powerfully muscled than cloud giants. They tend to have blue, yellow, or reddish-orange skin coloration, almost always with long, jet-black hair. They wield 10ft-long two-handed swords, with which they gain a +1 bonus to hit (the swords are not magical, merely well-honed). A daimyo giant will almost always (70%) be found with a small force of giant-retainers (see below), and if the giant does not have such a retinue it will be attended by 1d3+1 hill giants.

d100 Retinue
01-20: 1d3 cloud giants
21-50: 1d6 frost giants or fire giants (depends on nearest appropriate terrain)
51-60: 1d2 cloud giants and 1d6+1 hill giants
61-70: 1d3 frost or fire giants and 1d6+1 hill giants
71-00: 1d10+2 hill giants

In addition to any giant followers present, a daimyo giant will always have a retinue of ogre types in attendance: 1d3+1 ogre mages, 1d6+1 tusken ogres (q.v.), 1d6+4 ogres.

Daimyo giants are sometimes found occupying ancient ruins in the deep jungle; these will not have retinues of giant followers, but will have twice the normal number of ogre followers (of each type) and their lairs will also be protected by predatory cats and carnivorous apes.

  • Daimyo Giant: HD 12+2d6 hp; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 sword (5d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: +1 to hit, impervious to fire and cold.

Source: Monstrosities

Ferrous Giant

Ferrous giant stand 20 feet tall and have dark ruddy skin. They wear their hair long and most males are bearded. Hair color ranges from brown to black. Their eyes are typically brown, hazel, or green. Common dress consists of furs, skins, or armor. Ferrous giants grab opponents and pound them into the ground, ceiling or any nearby objects. Ferrous giants can employ various spell-like abilities: at will—heat metal, levitate; 1/day—wall of iron. Ferrous giants are immune to fire.

  • Ferrous Giant: HD 12+1d6 hp; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 weapon (4d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: none

Source: Ferrous Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Fire Giant

Fire giants are usually found near volcanic mountains, in great castles of basalt or even iron. They throw boulders for 5d6 hit points of damage.

  • Fire Giant: HD 11+ 1d4hp; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 weapon (5d6); Move 12; Save 4; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Hurl boulders, immune to fire.

Source: Monstrosities

Frost Giant

Frost giants dwell in cold regions, where they build (or conquer) castles in remote places of ice and snow. They throw boulders or great chunks of ice for 4d6 points of damage.

Frost giants dwell in cold regions, where they build (or conquer) castles in remote places of ice and snow. They throw boulders or great chunks of ice for 4d6 points of damage.

  • Frost Giant: HD 10+ 1d4hp; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 weapon (4d6); Move 12; Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Hurl boulders, immune to cold.

Source: Monstrosities

Hill Giant

Hill giants are the least of the giant races; most are brutish cave-dwellers who dress in pelts and uncured hides. They throw rocks for 2d8 points of damage.

  • Hill Giant: HD 8+2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 weapon (2d8); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Throw boulders.

Source: Monstrosities

Jack-In-Irons Giant

A jack-in-irons looks like a huge orc adorned in chains. It stands 20 to 25 feet tall and weighs 13,000 to 15,000 pounds. Any creature struck by its weapon must save or be stunned for 1 turn. A jack-in-irons can stomp its foot on the ground to cause powerful vibrations that radiate around the giant and cause opponents to fall down. The giant can throw rocks for 7d6 points of damage.

  • Jack-in-Irons Giant: HD 16+1d6 hp; AC 0 [19]; Atk Club (7d6); Move 15; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/2300; Special: none

Source: Jack-in-Irons Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Khmornian Giant

Khmornian giants are often found living in jungles, but they can be found in virtually any non-arctic terrain. These giants have four arms, and long tusks protruding from wide mouths. Their lairs are often guarded (90% chance) by 1d4 giant pythons.

Khmornian giants can throw rocks at a range up to 200ft, inflicting 2d10 points of damage; if they are not using any of their four arms in melee combat, these giants can hurl two such rocks per round.

The polyandrous female khmornian giants are found in a 1:3 ratio with the males. Females have only 9 hit dice, but they are considerably more dangerous than the males due to their spell casting and shapechanging abilities. All females are shamans with the spell casting ability of a 4th level cleric, and can shapeshift once per day into (and out of) a snakelike hybrid form. The snake hybrid has no significant difference from the normal form of the giantess, still having four arms, but the snake shape has an armor class of 2 and the shapeshift heals 50% of any damage suffered by the giantess prior to the change. Changing back to her normal shape also heals 50% of damage that was incurred while the giantess was in the snake-hybrid form.

Some extremely rare khmornian-giant females are sorceresses with the power of an 11th level magic-user; these individuals reside in well defended castles or ruined temples deep in the jungle. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Khmornian Giant (Male): HD 10+4; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 weapons (5d6); Move 12; Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Hurl rocks.
  • Khmornian Giant (Female): HD 9; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 weapons (5d6); Move 12; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Hurl rocks, shapeshift, spells (Clr4).

Source: Monstrosities

Sand Giant

Sand giants are brutal, somewhat barbaric giants that prey on those weaker than themselves. They have dark tan skin, brown hair, and dark brown or dark green eyes. An adult male stands approximately 20 feet tall. Males tend to wear their hair and beards braided. Sand giants wear light clothes and light armor (if any). In times of battle or war, males may don chainmail. A typical sand giant’s bag contains food, 3d4 mundane items and no more than 12d10 coins. Sand Giants speak their own harsh rongue and the common tongue. They can live to be 500 years old.

Sand giants make their homes in warm desert lands away from human civilization. They live in tribes consisting of 8-9 families of 2-4 members each. On occasion, a tribe forms a raiding party that sets off to the nearest civilized place, returning at a later time with food, treasure and captives. For each adult in a sand giant’s lair, there is a 40% chance that the lair has 1d3 captives of a random humanoid race.

Once per day, a sand giant can form a volume of sand within 40 feet into the shape of a 20-foot long arm that ends in a clenched fist. The arm has a reach of 20 feet, AC 0 [19] and 30 hp. It can attack once per round as a 12 HD monster and deals 1d10 points of damage on each attack and any creature struck must succeed on a saving throw or be stunned for 1 round. The arm remains for 17 rounds. A sand giant does not need to concentrate to maintain the arm and can direct it to attack a new target without sacrificing its own attack. The arm loses shape if it is reduced to 0 or less hit points, the duration expires, or the sand giant dies.

Sand giant scan also cast the following spells: Transmute rock to mud (2/day), move earth (2/day) and earthquake (1/day).

  • Sand Giant: HD 17; AC 2 [17]; Atk Two-handed sword (4d6) or 2 strikes (1d10); Move 15; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 19/4100; Special: Shape earth, spells, rock catching

Source: Sand Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Sea Giant

Sea giants are bluish-green amphibious giants standing 10 feet tall and weighing about 6,000 pounds. Sea giants adorn themselves in loose flowing robes of white, blue, or green. Many wear wreathes of coral in their hair. Sea giants are the living embodiment of the sea’s bounty and destructive wrath. They can control water as per the spell five times per day. They can also increase the pressure of the water in a 10-foot radius around them for 5 rounds. Any creature in this denser water must save or take 1d8 points of damage from the crushing water. Sea giants can move freely in water without hindrances.

  • Sea Giant: HD 14+1d6 hp; AC 2 [17]; Atk tridents (6d6); Move 15; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 15/2300; Special: hurl boulders, magical abilities

Source: Sea Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Smoke Giant

This filthy giant resembles a 9-foot-tall humanoid with soot-colored skin. A smoke giant’s form is solid, but it can turn into a smoky form similar to gaseous form. The giant can cause a billowing smoke cloud to surround it at will. The giant can throw rocks for 2d6 points of damage.

  • Smoke Giant: HD 8+1d6 hp; AC 5 [14]; Atk weapons (2d6); Move 15; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: hurl boulders, immune to fire, smoke form, smoke cloud

Source: Smoke Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Stone Giant

Stone giants dwell in caves, isolated in the mountain fastnesses. They throw rocks for 3d6 points of damage, and can be quite crafty in setting up ambushes in their native mountains. Travelers who wander into the territory of stone giants seldom return.

  • Stone Giant: HD 9+3; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 club (3d6); Move 12; Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Throw boulders.

Source: Monstrosities

Storm Giant

Storm giants are the largest of giants, the most intelligent, the most magical, and the most likely to talk with humans rather than simply devour them. Storm giants can live in underwater sea-castles as well as on the heights of mountains. They throw boulders for 7d6 points of damage, and have the power to control weather (as per the spell).

  • Storm Giant: HD 15+5; AC 1 [18]; Atk 1 weapon (6d6); Move 15; Save 3; AL any; CL/XP 16/3200; Special: Throw boulders, control weather.

Source: Monstrosities

Volcano Giant

A volcano giant is an 18-foot tall barrel-chested giant with black or brown hair and brown, black, or dark amber eyes. Its skin is leathery and tanned reddish-brown. The hair of a volcano giant is tough and wiry, with the strength and texture of copper. Three times per day, a volcano giant can exhale a cloud of sulfuric gas in a 30-foot cone. This gas causes creatures who fail a save to succumb to fits of coughing and choking. Volcano giants can throw rocks for 2d8 points of damage. Volcano giants are immune to fire.

  • Volcano Giant: HD 14+1d6 hp; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 weapon (4d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 16/3200; Special: Hurl boulders, breath weapon, immune to fire

Source: Volcano Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene, Casey Christofferson, and Erica Balsley.

Wood Giant

This giant resembles a wood elf of about 10 feet tall. It has brownish-green skin, a bald head, and bright green eyes.

Wood giants are peaceful, good-natured giants found in the forested areas of the world. The average wood giant stands 9 feet tall, weighs 900 pounds, and resembles a large wood elf. Wood giants have brownish-green skin, bright green eyes, large heads and prominent jaws; their elf-like ears sit high on their long, oval heads. Most wood giants (particularly males) are bald. Wood giants dress in greens or browns and prefer neutral colors to the bright or dull colors of other races. Wood giants speak their own language and the language of elfs, and may also speak common. Wood giants can live to be 400 years old. Three times per day, a wood giant can alter its form so as to appear as any humanoid creature between 3 feet and 15 feet tall.

Wood giants are on friendly terms with most benign creatures of the forest, particularly wood elves. Though contact outside their immediate clan is rare, they do occasionally have dealings with nearby tribes of wood elves. Wood giant villages are large and open expanses of land with few if any buildings or shelters. Wood giants prefer to spend their time under the warmth of the day and the serenity of the night. They do not associate with—and usually attack on sight—evil forest creatures. The leaders of wood giant clans might have the abilities of 1st to 3rd level rangers.

  • Wood Giant: HD 7; AC 1 [18]; Atk Two-handed sword (2d8) or longbow (2d6); Move 15; Save 9 (7 vs. charm); AL L; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Change self, surprise on roll of 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Wood Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original materials by Wizards of the Coast.


Giant Slug of P’Nahk

P’Nahki slugs are massive, translucent creatures. The only clearly visible part of the slug’s anatomy is the disturbingly human-looking brain suspended in the slug’s body, appearing at first glance to be floating in the air. These creatures originated in a forgotten place called P’Nahk; whether this was a ruined city, a lost world, or an entirely different dimension is not known.

The giant slugs of P’Nahk are highly intelligent, although this intellect is seldom put to use in a way that can be related to human motivation or logic. All P’Nahki slugs have ESP ability. Three times per day, a giant P’Nahki slug can issue forth a blast of insanity in a cone shape 60ft long, expanding to a width of 60ft at the far end. Anyone within the area of the blast must make a saving throw or be affected as follows:

d100 Effect
01-25: frozen by fear for 1d4+1 rounds; the character will (and must) fight back against a direct assault but can take no other action
26-50: insane rage for 1d4+1 rounds; the character attacks any former allies in a frenzy of hatred
51-75: self-hatred for 1d4+1 rounds; the character drops any held items and claws at his/her own body, inflicting 1hp of damage per round.
76-00: adoration for 1d4+1 rounds; the character drops all held items, falls to the floor, and grovels in worship of the slug.

Because of their translucency, giant slugs of P’Nahk surprise opponents with a 1-3 on 1d6. Their rubbery bodies are immune to damage from blunt weapons. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Giant Slug of P’Nahk: HD 8; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (2d8); Move 9; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Surprise on 1-3, blast of insanity, immune to blunt weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Gibbering Mouther

Gibbering mouthers are amorphous blobs of flesh with multiple eyes and mouths appearing and disappearing from the quivering mass of the body as it moves along. The mouths gibber and babble meaningless, speech-like noises; the monster is perpetually accompanied by this disturbing and inhuman sound except when it is waiting to ambush prey, in which case the eyes and mouths are all kept closed, and the monster appears to be nothing more than an oozy pile of earth. When the mouther spots prey, it begins gibbering loudly, causing anyone within 60ft to make a saving throw or become confused (per the spell). Each round spent listening to the mouther requires another saving throw. In any given round, the mouther will have six mouths available either to spit or to bite. The creature’s spittle flashes brightly upon impact with most surfaces, causing anyone nearby to make a saving throw or be blinded for one round. The mouther’s bites are not particularly deadly in and of themselves, but once a mouth hits it fastens on and continues to do automatic damage thereafter. Also, if a character has 3 or more mouths fastened to him, there is a risk of slipping and being covered by the mouther (which allows the mouther to attack with 12 additional mouths on its underside). The chance of slipping is 5%, and if more than 3 mouths are attached the chance increases by 5% per additional mouth. The ground around a gibbering mouther, in a radius of 5-ft, will be soft and mud-like, for the mouther changes the consistency of the ground beneath itself.

  • Gibbering Mouther: HD 4+4; AC 1 [18]; Atk 6 mouths (1hp); Move 3; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Gibbering, spit, pull prey underneath.

Source: Monstrosities

Gillmonkey

Gillmonkeys are nasty, monkey-like creatures that live in the sea. They have hairless, pinkish-brown skin and short tentacle-like growths on the top of the head. They attack in packs, sometimes swarming over a ship’s rail.

  • Gillmonkey: HD 1d6hp; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d4), 2 claws (1hp); Move 6 (Swim 12); Save 18; AL C; CL/XP B/10; Special: Breathe underwater.

Source: Monstrosities

Glass Butterfly

Glass Butterflies are tiny, wizard-made entities, made of colored glass and resembling butterflies the size of a bird or cat. They were once made as decoration for the noble houses of antiquity, and are usually found in large numbers flitting aimlessly about. Glass Butterflies will usually ignore any creature that comes near them, and simply fly a few feet away if attacked. They are constantly in motion, creating a pleasant play of light and color if there is a light source present, and only touch the ground when destroyed. Being mindless, they are unaffected by spells such as sleep, charm, and hold. They are otherwise extremely susceptible to damage, and can be easily destroyed. However, the magic that animates a Glass Butterfly is too powerful to be contained in such a frail and simple vessel. When slain, there is a burst of energy in a 2ft radius. This does not cause damage, but has a cumulative chance of causing a random spell effect, equal to 5% per Glass Butterfly destroyed in the past turn. Whenever the percentage reaches 100%, it resets to 0%. If caught in an area effect, 1 Glass Butterfly is destroyed per dice of damage, and one damage die is rolled to determine how many additional Glass Butterflies are destroyed. Any Light spell cast upon a Glass Butterfly is increased by 50% in both duration and area of effect. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Glass Butterfly: HD 1d4hp; AC 9 [10]; Atk none; Move (Fly 20); Save 18; AL N; CL/XP A/5; Special: chance of random spell discharge upon death

Source: Monstrosities

Glass Wyrm

This semi-transparent dragon appears to be formed of crystal or glass. Its large wings are translucent and the sound of grating glass can be heard when it moves. It breathes razor-sharp shards of glass in a 60-foot-long cone that is roughly 30 feet wide at the base. Any light source brought within 30 feet of a glass dragon’s reflective surface causes the light to reflect as a burst that blinds all creatures within 30 feet for 1d6 rounds unless a save is made. Spells that target a glass dragon have a 50% chance of reflecting in a random direction.

  • Glass Wyrm: HD 5-7; AC 1 [18]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), 1 bite (3d6); Move 9/24 (flying); Save 12, 11 , or 9; AL N; CL/XP 5 HD (8/800); 6 HD (9/1100), 7 HD (10/1400); Special: Breathes shards of glass

Source: Glass Wyrm from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Glimmer

Glimmers are shapes of greenish or yellowish light, with a slight resemblance to will-o-wisps. They are generally found in dismal swamps and marshes, but can also be found in natural caverns as well. Looking directly at a glimmer requires that the observer make a saving throw or become confused, as per the spell, for 2d6 rounds. Glimmers attack by flashing a blast of magical cold at an opponent, causing 2d6 hit points of damage (saving throw for half damage). Glimmers are immune to both fire and cold. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Glimmer: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk cold blast (2d6); Move (Fly 9); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Confusion, immune to fire and cold.

Source: Monstrosities

Glitterskull

The Glitterskull is a gold-plated skull, with large red gems set into the eye sockets. It flies by magical levitation, and is surrounded by a reddish halo. This halo is of magical flame, and causes a roaring sound when the creature is flying about. It also sheds light in a 15-ft. radius, and at a distance may be mistaken for torchlight. The skull is that of a wizard, usually but not always human. A glitterskull has the spellcasting ability of a level 8 magic-user, and does not require a spellbook to regain its daily spells. Being a former wizard, the glitterskull prefers to attack by casting spells, but it may also fly at opponents, ramming into them for 1d6 damage. Its fiery halo does not cause extra damage, but may ignite flammable objects. Glitterskulls can only be harmed by magical weapons. They can catch a Magic Missile spell within their eyes, and hurl it back at the caster the following round (instead of attacking) or use the spell energy to heal themselves (spell damage adding to HP). Glitterskulls are also immune to poison and gas attacks, and take only half damage from fire-based attacks.

The glitterskull is capable of speech, and retains much of the intelligence of its former life. While it may parley with strong parties, the mind trapped inside a glitterskull has been warped by the millennia, and most utter little more than mocking laughter and scornful commentary. The gems and gold plating of a glitterskull may be worth anywhere from 200 to 1,200 GP, in addition to other treasure. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Glitterskull: HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 ram (1d6); Move (Fly 18); Save 8; AL C: CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Spells (as level 8 magic-user), immune to non-magical weapons, immune to poison and gases, half damage from fire.

Source: Monstrosities

Gloom Crawler

Gloom crawlers resemble giant squid with many, 5-foot-long tentacles that end in a small, round, lidless eye with a stark blue pupil. These many eyes let it see in all directions at once, and let it sense the location of anything within 60 feet that is touching the ground. If a gloom crawler hits with a tentacle, it grabs the victim and constricts for automatic damage in the rounds thereafter until the creature is freed. Gloom crawlers take 1d4 points of damage from natural sunlight.

  • Gloom Crawler: HD 10; AC 3 [16]; Atk 10 tentacles (1d6 plus constrict), bite (2d8); Move 9; Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Constrict, all-around senses, vulnerable to sunlight

Source: Gloom Crawler from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gloomwing

Gloomwings look like a giant moths with black wings covered in spiraled patterns of silver. Eight legs run the length of the their bodies, each ending in a pearly-white claw. Their mouths have two large pearly-white mandibles. The gloomwing is native to the Plane of Shadow and is summoned to the Material Plane by spellcasters to act as a guardian. On occasion, a gloomwing slips through a tear in the fabric of the planes and enters the Material Plane on its own. The ivory mandibles of a gloomwing can be pried or broken from its carcass and sold for 100 gp each.

The coloration on the gloomwing’s back and wings provide it with protection against some predators. Any creature viewing the gloomwing from above must succeed on a saving throw or be affected as if by a confusion spell for 6 rounds.

After the first round of combat, a gloomwing can emit a scent in a 30-foot radius that weakens living creatures in the area. An affected creature can make a saving throw each round it remains in the area to negate the effects. Otherwise, they suffer a -1 penalty on melee attacks and melee damage. The pheromone ceases when the gloomwing dies. Strength damage dealt by a gloomwing’s pheromone heals at a rate of 1 point per hour. Each round a gloomwing emits its weakness pheromone there is a 20% chance that 1d4 additional gloomwings arrive in the area and join the battle.

Female gloomwings lay their eggs in the bodies of slain victims. In 12 days, these eggs hatch, releasing 1d6+3 tenebrous worms. The young emerge about 2 weeks later as a tenebrous worms (see that entry), literally devouring the host from inside. While implanted, a body cannot be brought back to life except by the casting of a wish. If cure disease is cast on the body, the eggs are destroyed and the body can be raised normally.

  • Gloomwing: HD 5; AC 0 [19]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), bite (1d8); Move 3/15 (flying); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Confusion, implant, weakness pheromone, summon gloomwings

Source: Gloomwing from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Glurm (Zen Frog)

Intelligent frog-like humanoids, Glurm can usually be found sitting in meditation or study amid scenes of natural beauty. They wear simple loincloths and will have a bamboo staff within arm’s reach. Their dwellings are of woven reeds, and contain only a few simple items. If there are several glurm in the area, there will be a “place of harmony” near a stream or river. This will be a cleared expanse of sand, dotted with boulders to sit upon; the glurm come here to discuss philosophy and practice their martial arts.

The spiritual studies of the glurm have given them mystical powers, and they practice martial arts, accounting for their armor class. Glurm are pacifists, and if threatened will attempt to drive off foes with an intimidating display of martial arts. All onlookers within 30ft must make a saving throw or back away for 1 round. If forced into combat, a glurm’s unarmed strikes cause 1d4 damage; opponents of equal or smaller size can only act after the glurm in the following round if the glurm inflicts maximum damage. Armed with a bamboo staff, a glurm can focus its spiritual energy for a +2 bonus to damage; in addition, if the attack roll is 4 or more higher than required to hit, the glurm may disarm a foe, trip them up, or perform a similar manuever. In an open area, the glurm may also use its staff to make a pole-vault kick against an opponent up to 10ft away, possibly knocking them down. Lastly, the glurm has the abilities of a level 3 cleric.

Any treasure possessed by the glurm will generally be in the form of scrolls discoursing on obscure philosophical topics, and finely crafted writing materials. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Glurm (Zen frog): HD 3+2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 unarmed strike (1d4) or 1 bamboo staff (1d6+2); Move 12; Save 14; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Martial arts, spells as level 3 cleric (2 level 1 spells).

Source: Monstrosities

Gnarlwood

A gnarlwood resembles a treant but instead of the kindly, gentle face of the tree-folk its face is twisted into a grim scowl. Its deep-set eyes and jagged mouth give it an almost skull-like grimace and its four twisted arms are tipped in sharp woody claws. Its leaves are deep green, almost black, and have ghostly white markings on them. Behind it, the skeletal remains of unfortunate animals shamble through the undergrowth. A gnarlwood exudes a 20-foot radius protection from good around it, and can animate dead within 60 feet at will. If a gnarlwood hits a single opponent with two branches, it grabs the creature and does an additional 1d6 points of damage as it rends the victim’s flesh.

  • Gnarlwood: HD 11; AC 2 [17]; Atk 4 branches (2d6); Move 12; Save 4; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: magical abilities, animate dead, rend, protection aura

Source: Gnarlwood from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Gnoll

Gnolls are tall humanoids with hyena-like heads. They may be found both above ground and in subterranean caverns. They form into loosely organized clans, often ranging far from home in order to steal and kill with rapacious ferocity.

  • Gnoll: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (2d4) or weapon (1d10); Move 9; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Goat, Giant

Giant goats include giant mountain goats. These creatures are as large as a pony, and can be ridden.

  • Giant Goat: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 gore (2d6); Move 18; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: +4 damage on charge.

Source: Monstrosities

Goblins

Goblin

Goblins are small creatures (4 ft tall or so) that inhabit dark woods, underground caverns, and (possibly) the otherworldly realms of the fey. They attack at -1 in the full sunlight.

  • Goblin: HD 1d6hp; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 9; Save 18; AL C; CL/XP B/10; Special: -1 to hit in sunlight.

Source: Monstrosities

Goblin, Belfry

Belfry goblins appear to be related to the other goblinoid species, but they have wing membranes which run from their arms down their sides, quite similar to flying squirrels. These membranes grant the belfry goblin the ability to glide, and in no way inhibit the ability of their hands to manipulate objects. Hanging upside down on the ceiling in dark corners, belfry goblins are all but invisible, waiting for their prey to pass by and then attacking with a deadly swooping attack, a javelin in each hand, doing double damage on a successful hit with the swooping attack. If the swoop attack succeeds on a “to hit” roll of 18 or better, the belfry goblin does additional damage as it passes by, raking with its foot claws for an additional 1d6 damage. A belfry goblin has 2 attacks per round, with any combination of its hand held weapon, claws, or bite. The bite of a belfry goblin is dangerous in much the same way as a rat bite, with a 5% chance per bite the victim will contract a disease. Diseased victims will sicken and die within 1d6 days, unless the victim rolls a saving throw.

For every 20 belfry goblins encountered there will be a leader with the maximum of 9 hit points and who attacks as a 2 HD creature. If a nest of 40 or more individuals is found, there will be a chieftain with 2+2 HD who attacks as a 3 HD monster. The chieftain will have an honor guard of 4 particularly fearsome warriors whose stats are equal to that of the leader type. There is also at least a 15% chance that in any belfry goblin encounter there will be a vampiric variant present. The chance to encounter these special vampiric belfry goblins increases to 30% for standard lairs and 60% for nests of 40 or more. (Author: Cameron DuBeers and the Lizard of Oz)

  • Belfry Goblin: HD 1; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 attacks from claws (1d6), weapons (1d6), and/or 1 bite (1d4); Move 6 (Glide 12); Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Swooping attack, chance of disease.

Source: Monstrosities

Goblin, Belfry (Vampiric)

These creatures are physically weaker and lighter in coloration than the standard belfry goblin, having only 1-1 HD, but they are able to gain strength from drinking the blood of their victims. On a successful bite attack, the vampiric belfry goblin sucks blood from its victim for 1d4 points of damage, wrapping its arms and legs around the victim and holding them fast. Each subsequent round, the victim must break the grip or the vampiric belfry goblin automatically drains an additional 1d4 hit points of blood drain; the chance to break the grip is 30%. Vampiric belfry goblins gain temporary bonus hit points from blood they drink, gaining 1 hp for every 1 hit point drained from a victim, up to double its normal number of hit points. Once the vampiric belfry goblin exceeds its normal hit points, it gains +1 to hit and damage. (Author: Cameron DuBeers and the Lizard of Oz)

  • Vampiric Belfry Goblin: HD 1-1; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 attacks from claws (1d6), weapons (1d6), and/or 1 bite (1d4); Move 6 (Glide 12); Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Swooping attack, chance of disease, blood drain.

Source: Monstrosities

Goblin, Oni-Aka (Asian Red Goblin)

The Oni-aka (red goblins) are short, scaly humanoids with small horns on their slightly pointed heads. They have coarse black hair, and coal black eyes. These evil beings are known to raid villages to steal slaves and cattle. They are typically armed with clubs and short spears they use for throwing. These goblins are said to have been born of fire in the pits of the earth; and as such they are almost impervious to fire damage, suffering only half normal damage from any fire-based attack. Note that these goblins are from Asian mythology, and might not be related to normal goblins in anything but name. (Author: MikeD)

  • Oni-aka (Red Goblin): HD 1; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 9; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Fire resistant.

Source: Monstrosities

Goblin, Oni-Kage (Asian Shadow Goblin)

The Oni-kage (shadow goblins) are short, black-skinned humanoids with large, pale eyes, dwellers of dark caves and deep bamboo thickets. All oni-kage detest bright lights, and they suffer -1 penalties to combat in daylight. They have keen night vision, and their somewhat supernatural nature makes them completely invisible in darkness (visible only by use of spells). Note that these goblins are from Asian mythology, and might not be related to normal goblins in anything but name. (Author: MikeD)

  • Oni-kage: HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 9; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: -1 penalty in daylight, Invisible in darkness.

Source: Monstrosities

Goblin, Oni-Yama (Asian Mountain Goblin)

The oni-yama are hairless, grey-skinned humanoids with short tusks protruding from their mouths. They are smaller than ogres, but much larger and bulkier than men — though their distinctively hunched posture makes them appear somewhat smaller than they really are. These big goblins dwell in remote mountain caves and forgotten ruins, often preying upon merchants and travelers passing through their territories. In general, they arm themselves with such weapons as they can take from their victims, for they are not industrious. They wear an assortment of armor, usually misused but still functional. The oni-yama bully, and often enslave, lesser goblins. Despite their size, the oni-yama are extremely stealthy on their great, flat feet, and gain surprise on a roll of 1-3 on a d6. Note that these goblins are from Asian mythology, and might not be related to normal goblins in anything but name. (Author: MikeD)

  • Oni-yama: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 12; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: 50% chance to gain surprise attacks.

Source: Monstrosities

Goblin, Redcap (Chaos Goblin)

Redcaps (or chaos goblins) are goblins driven mad by the insidious effects of raw Chaos, reducing them to a bestial state. Utterly devoid of empathy with any living creature, including ordinary goblins, redcaps delight in inflicting pain. Indeed, redcaps derive a strange form of sustenance from doing so. Any successful attack a redcap achieves heals it for an amount equal to the amount of damage it deals to its target. Worse yet, a redcap can double its total hit points in this manner. Thus, a undamaged redcap with 5 hit points who manages to deal 3 points of damage on its attack will now have 8 hit points and, assuming it continues to remain undamaged, can be “healed” for another 2 hit points before reaching its maximum potential hit points. Though thoroughly insane, redcaps work well with others of their kind, forming predatory packs that attack any creature they can find. Redcaps often take gruesome souvenirs of their victims, such as fingers, ears, and eyeballs, which they use to adorn themselves. Many also use the blood of their prey to dye their tattered clothing, including their hats, the practice of which gave these foul aberrations their common name. (Author: James Malizsewski)

  • Redcap: HD 1d6hp; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 9; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Vicious healing, -1 to hit in sunlight.

Source: Monstrosities

Gohl (Hydra Cloud)

A gohl is a 10-foot-wide, 10-foot-high, blob of mottled black and gray flesh, slimy and rubbery to the touch. From its central form sprout six long tentacles of brownish flesh and three snake-like heads, each head perched atop a long, thin neck. Each head is gold with red eyes and has a wide mouth lined with double rows of needle-sharp teeth. Many small tendrils appear from the gohl’s central form at random intervals only to disappear back into its massive trunk. A gohl tries to grab victim in its tentacles. If an opponent is struck by two or more tentacles in the same round, he is constricted and takes 1d6+3 damage each round thereafter. Creatures held by a tentacle are pulled toward the creature’s mouth. The toxic bite of a gohl deals 1d8 points of acid damage.

  • Gohl: HD 12; AC -1 [20]; Atk 6 tentacles (1d6+3) and 3 acidic bites (1d8+3); Move 15 (flying); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Acid, constrict, +1 magic weapons to hit

Source: Gohl from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Golden Cat

A gohl is a 10-foot-wide, 10-foot-high, blob of mottled black and gray flesh, slimy and rubbery to the touch. From its central form sprout six long tentacles of brownish flesh and three snake-like heads, each head perched atop a long, thin neck. Each head is gold with red eyes and has a wide mouth lined with double rows of needle-sharp teeth. Many small tendrils appear from the gohl’s central form at random intervals only to disappear back into its massive trunk. A gohl tries to grab victim in its tentacles. If an opponent is struck by two or more tentacles in the same round, he is constricted and takes 1d6+3 damage each round thereafter. Creatures held by a tentacle are pulled toward the creature’s mouth. The toxic bite of a gohl deals 1d8 points of acid damage.

  • Golden Cat: HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1d2); Move 10; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: lucky/unlucky

Source: Golden Cat from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Golems

Golems are man-shaped creatures built to serve their masters, usually powerful wizards or high priests. They are often used as guardians. Golems cannot be hit with non-magical weapons, and are immune to the sorts of spells used to create them (iron golems being immune to fire, for instance). You can find the details in the specific monster descriptions.

Blood Golem

This creature looks like a hideous, bloated slug, blood red in color. Two long spindly arms protrude from its upper body. It has no other discernible features. Contrary to their name, blood golems are not constructs, but rather slug-shaped clots of living blood animated by a dark and ancient ritual. A typical blood golem is 10 feet long and weighs 700 pounds.

Each time a blood golem hits a living opponent with an attack, it gains a number of hit points equal to the damage dealt. These bonus hit points are added to the blood golem’s total. When a blood golem absorbs enough blood to raise its hit points to the maximum for its HD, it splits into two identical blood golems, each with half the original’s hit points. For example, a 6 HD blood golem that reaches 48 hit points splits into two 6 HD blood golems with 24 hit points each.

If a blood golem successfully hits an opponent with both of its slam attacks in a single round, that opponent suffers catastrophic blood expulsion, taking 2d4 points of constitution damage (saving throw for half). A blood golem gains 3 hit points per point of constitution damage it deals.

A blood golem is slowed (as the spell) for 1d4 rounds by any cold-based attacks or effects. A purify food and water spell deals 1d6 points of damage per caster level to a blood golem. A blood golem can attempt a saving throw to reduce the damage by half.

  • Blood Golem: HD 6 (25hp); AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 strikes (1d8 plus blood consumption); Move 12; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Blood consumption, cell division, +1 or better weapon to hit, regenerate (2 hp/rd), immune to mind-affecting abilities, resistance to fire (50%).

Blood Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Clay Golem

The “original” golem of folklore, clay golems may be created by Clerics or powerful priests. They are massive clay statues of human beings, imbued with a rudimentary intelligence and the ability to move and follow their masters’ commands. For each round of combat, a clay golem has a 1% chance (cumulative) to go berserk, leaving its master’s control and attacking enemies and allies alike. Clay golems are not damaged by slashing or piercing weapons. They are immune to all spells other than those affecting earth, and these have very diminished effects – with one exception. An earthquake spell may be used to utterly destroy a clay golem.

  • Clay Golem: HD 10 (45hp); AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 fist (3d10); Move 8; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 14/2600; Special: Immune to slashing and piercing weapons, immune to most spells.

Source: Monstrosities

Flagstone Golem

A flagstone golem is composed of large flat stones and bricks jointed and fitted together so as to allow the creature to fold itself flat. A flagstone golem stands 10 feet tall and weighs 1,200 pounds. Spells that affect rock are the only ones that affect flagstone golems. Any energy-based (acid, fire, cold, electricity) attack that directly effects a flagstone golem is absorbed into its body dealing no damage. A flagstone golem can use the absorbed energy to repair itself, healing 1 hit point for every 3 points of damage the attack would have otherwise dealt. Or it can release the energy in a 30-foot cone that deals 3d8 points of damage to all within the area. An opponent can save to reduce the damage by half.

  • Flagstone Golem: HD 9 (50 hp); AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 fists (2d8); Move 8; Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Hit only by magic weapons, immune to most spells.

Source: Flagstone Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Flesh Golem

A creation stitched together from human limbs and other parts, a flesh golem is similar to Frankenstein’s monster. Only +1 or better magic weapons can harm a flesh golem, and it is slowed by fire and cold spells. Lightning heals the golem for the number of points of damage that it would normally inflict. No other type of spell affects a flesh golem.

  • Flesh Golem: HD 8 (40hp); AC 9 [10]; Atk 2 fists (2d8); Move 8; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Healed by lightning, hit only by magic weapons, slowed by fire and cold, immune to most spells.

Source: Monstrosities

Furnace Golem

Furnace golems are 20-foot-tall suits of black iron armor with a large grate opening in their abdomen covering roaring flames. The fires are magical and cannot be extinguished. Once every 1d4 rounds, the golem belches forth a 50-foot line of fire that does 10d6 points of damage (save for half). If a furnace golem hits a single opponent with 2 slams, it grabs the opponent (save avoids) and shoves the victim into its furnace interior (2d6 damage per round while trapped). Cold-based spells slow the golem (as per the slow spell), while fire spells restore hit points. No other type of spell affects a furnace golem.

  • Furnace Golem: HD 18 (75 hp); AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 slams (4d8 + fire); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 20/4400; Special: Breath weapon, fire heals, cold slows, +2 weapons to hit, immune to most spells

Source: Flagstone Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gelatinous Golem

A gelatinous golem is a humanoid-shaped, semi-transparent amoeba that stands 8 feet tall and weighs 600 pounds. It has rudimentary intelligence. A gelatinous golem secretes an anesthetizing slime that paralyzes opponents for 2d4 rounds who fail a save. If a gelatinous golem hits an opponent with both fists, it can decide to engulf the opponent automatically on the next round. An engulfed opponent takes 1d6 points of damage each round from the the gelatinous golem’s acid each round it remains trapped. Attacks on a gelatinous golem deal half their damage to anyone engulfed by the creature. Cold slows a gelatinous golem. It is immune to all other spells.

  • Gelatinous Golem: HD 10 (65 hp); AC 9 [10]; Atk 2 fists (2d6 + paralysis); Move 8; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Hit only by magic weapons, immune to most spells

Source: Gelatinous Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Glass Golem

A glass golem is a human-shaped statue of glass that has been animated by a captured spirit infused into its physical substance. These creatures are immune to all spells other than cold-based magic, which has the effect of a slow spell but does not damage the golem. Blunt weapons inflict double damage against them, and they can be hit by normal weapons. A glass golem glitters brilliantly unless it is in total darkness, capturing and reflecting light by a thousand-fold. Anyone looking upon a glass golem, even through a mirror, must make a saving throw or attack at -2 to hit. (Conversion by Matt Finch, first appearing in Black Monastery by Frog God Games)

  • Glass Golem: HD 10 (45hp); AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 swords (2d8); Move 9; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Immunities

Source: Monstrosities

Ice Golem

A gelatinous golem is a humanoid-shaped, semi-transparent amoeba that stands 8 feet tall and weighs 600 pounds. It has rudimentary intelligence. A gelatinous golem secretes an anesthetizing slime that paralyzes opponents for 2d4 rounds who fail a save. If a gelatinous golem hits an opponent with both fists, it can decide to engulf the opponent automatically on the next round. An engulfed opponent takes 1d6 points of damage each round from the the gelatinous golem’s acid each round it remains trapped. Attacks on a gelatinous golem deal half their damage to anyone engulfed by the creature. Cold slows a gelatinous golem. It is immune to all other spells.

  • Ice Golem: HD 7 (30 hp); AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 slams (2d6 plus 1d6 cold); Move 9; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Breath weapon, cold, immunity to cold, immunity to magic, double damage from fire

Source: Ice Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Iron Golem

Iron golems are huge moving statues of iron. They can breathe a 10-foot-radius cloud of poison gas as well as attacking with great power. Weapons of +2 or less do not affect iron golems. These hulking statues are slowed by lightning spells, but fire-based spells actually restore hit points to them. No other type of spell affects them.

  • Iron Golem: HD 16 (80hp); AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 weapon or fist (4d10); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Poison gas, immune to all weapons +2 or less, slowed by lightning, healed by fire, immune to most magic.

Source: Monstrosities

Iron Maiden Golem

An iron maiden golem is a hollow torture device. The golem appears as a tall, well-muscled male or female warrior. An iron maiden golem has articulated arms and legs. If an iron maiden golem hits a victim with two slams, it must save or become trapped inside the golem. Trapped creatures take 20 points of damage each round from the dagger-like blades inside the lid. A creature slain inside the golem transforms into a zombie. Only +2 or better magic weapons can harm an iron maiden golem, and it is slowed by lightning spells. Fire-based spells heal the golem. No other type of spell affects an iron maiden golem.

  • Iron Maiden Golem: HD 12 (50 hp); AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 slams (2d10); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 14/2600; Special: Animate host, +2 magic weapons to hit, slowed by lightning, healed by fire, immune to most spells

Source: Iron Maiden Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Magnesium Golem

A magnesium golem is a silvery-white humanoid formed of magnesium standing 6-7 feet tall and weighing 600 pounds. The magnesium golem’s features are smooth and perfect, though it has no discernible ears, nose, or mouth. Its eyes are indentations in its face. A 10-foot aura of sickness radiates around the magnesium golem that sickens any creature it hits or that gets near it (save avoids). This sickness lasts for 1d4 turns. Water-based spells slow a magnesium golem (as per the slow spell), while fire-based spells heal the golem. They are immune to all other spells, and +1 weapons are required to hit them.

  • Magnesium Golem: HD 7; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 slams (2d6+1); Move 6; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Sickness, +1 weapons to hit, immune to most spells

Source: Magnesium Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Mummy Golem

A mummy golem stands 6 feet tall and weighs 300 pounds. Its body is composed of tightly knotted and rolled bandages held together by magic (and more bandages). A mummy golem can wrap bandages from its body around a grappled foe’s throat. The bandages can come from anywhere on its body, not just its arm or hand, so the mummy golem can continue using its fist. A strangled creature takes 1d6 points of damage each round. A mummy golem can strangle a maximum of 4 opponents. Fire and fire-based spells affect mummy golems normally. They are immune to all other spells.

  • Mummy Golem: HD 9 (55 hit points); AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 fists (1d8); Move 10; Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Hit only by +1 magic weapons, immune to most spells, constriction

Source: Mummy Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Ooze Golem

Ooze golems are 10-foot-tall amorphous creatures of swirling colors that can alter their shape to appear roughly humanoid. Their natural form resembles a column or pillar with two large pseudopods extending from its central trunk that function as arms. In humanoid form, an ooze golem’s lower torso ends in two powerful legs, and the creature can flatten its body to squeeze through cracks up to 2 inches in size. An ooze golem secretes a deadly acid that deals an extra 1d6 points of damage with each hit. Spells don’t affect ooze golems. When killed, an ooze golem explodes in a burst of acid that does 2d6 points of damage to all within 10 feet (save for half).

  • Ooze Golem: HD 10; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 slams (2d8 + 1d6 acid); Move 6; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Acid, death throes, immune to blunt weapons, immune to most spells, regenerate 2 hp/round

Source: Ooze Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Rope Golem

A rope golem is a tangled mess of knotted and bundled ropes in roughly humanoid form. The typical rope golem stands 7 feet tall but weighs only about 100 pounds. Its long, gangly arms end in noose-like hands. Until it is activated, a rope golem appears to be nothing more than a pile of normal ropes. If a rope golem hits the same opponent with 2 slams, it twists the foe into its ropy clutches to strangle him for 1d8 damage for each round thereafter. A rope golem takes one and a half damage from all fire-based spells. Rope trick deals 1d6 points of damage. They are immune to all other spells.

  • Rope Golem: HD 5; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 slams (2d6); Move 6; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Strangulation, vulnerable to fire, immune to magic

Source: Rope Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Stone Golem

Stone golems are massive stone statues animated by very powerful magics (much more than just animate object, in other words). They are slowed by fire spells, damaged by rock-to-mud spells, and healed by the reverse. Spells that affect rock, and fire spells, are the only ones that affect stone golems. They can only be hit by +2 or better weapons.

  • Stone Golem: HD 12 (60hp); AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 fist (3d8); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 16/3200; Special: +1 or better magic weapon to hit, immune to most magic.

Source: Monstrosities

Stone Guardian Golem

Stone guardians are sometimes referred to as lesser stone golems. It resembles a stocky humanoid formed of mud and stone. Stone guardians are often used as guardians by their creators. When the stone guardian is first constructed, the creator crafts a magical ring that offers himself (or anyone to whom he gives the ring) protection from that stone guardian. A stone guardian can see invisible creatures.

A stone guardian’s body is constructed from mud mixed with rare herbs and powders worth at least
500 gp. A large chunk of stone inserted into the chest cavity functions as its “heart.” The magical ring that links a stone guardian is constructed at the same time and costs 300 gp to create.

  • Stone Guardian Golem: HD 4 (20 hp); AC 1 [18]; Atk 2 slams (2d6); Move 9; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Resistance to cold, electricity and fire (50%), ring link, see invisibility

Source: Stone Guardian Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Lenard Lakofka.

Tallow Golem

The tallow golem is a humanoid construct composed entirely of wax. It bears no facial features unless the creator chooses to render a lifelike “wax dummy,” in which case the golem can appear quite real indeed. Wizards who specialize in the creation of tallow golems refer to themselves as “chandlers.” Unlike other golem-sculptors, chandlers consider their work a form of art. The golem wears whatever clothing (if any) that its creator desires, usually rags or trousers. It has no possessions and no weapons. The golem cannot speak or utter any sound. It moves slowly, but relentlessly.

A creature hit by both of a tallow golem’s slam attacks in a single round must pass a saving throw or be pinned. A tallow golem can break down and absorb chemicals from a pinned victim, dealing 1d12 points of damage each round the pin is maintained. Additionally, this causes skin discoloration. The victim must make a successful saving throw or lose 1 point of charisma permanently.

The tallow golem is formed from a large block of candle wax mixed with special powders worth at least 500 gp.

  • Tallow Golem: HD 10 (40 hp); AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 slams (1d8); Move 9; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Chemisorb, only harmed by sharp weapons, immunity to cold, double damage from fire

Source: Tallow Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Lance Hawvermale and Scott Greene.

Wax Golem

Wax Golems are among the simplest type of golem to create. Their bodies are carved out of tallow or wax and imbued with the same basic level of intelligence as the more powerful Clay Golem. Unlike their stronger kin, Wax Golems have no chance of going berserk, nor are they automatically immune to spells. They do possess magic resistance of 25% and cannot be hit by non-magic weapons. Because of the pliable nature of their bodies, Wax Golems easily absorb the force delivered by blunt weapons and only take half damage from those sources. Slashing and piercing weapons inflict normal damage to Wax Golems. Fire and heat that damage the golem will inflict twice normal damage. (Author: Andrew Trent)

  • Wax Golem: HD 4 (20 HP); AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 fists (1d8+3); Move 6; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Resistant to blunt weapons, Magic resistance (25%).

Source: Monstrosities

Witch-Doll Golem

A witch-doll golem appears to be crafted from stuffed human skin dressed in a patchwork of ill-fitting clothes. Large needles and pins pierce the creature’s body where a humanoid’s vital organs would be. A witch-doll golem stands twice the height of a human and weighs about 1,000 pounds. A witch-doll golem can be commanded to target a specific foe. Against that foe, the witch-doll golem deals an extra 1d8 points of damage with each fist. Once the golem hits its intended target, half of any further damage the witch-doll golem takes is transferred to the victim so long as they are within 60 feet of each other. Only the linked target can attack a witch-doll golem and not take “linked damage.” Witch-doll golems take full damage from fire and do not pass this damage to their linked target. They are immune to all other spells.

  • Witch-Doll Golem: HD 10 (65 hp); AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 fists (2d8); Move 10; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Hit only by +1 magic weapons, immune to most spells, linked damage

Source: Witch-Doll Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Wood Golem

Arcane spellcasters used several ancient texts to arrive at a process to create inexpensive yet still quite powerful golems. They had master craftsmen create wood statues with articulating limbs and then performed the proper spells to animate and control them. The statues vary in shape and form and usually have weapons of some sort held in each hand. The wood golems were designed to act both as an alarm and a protection against intruders. Wood golems let out a piercing howl that lasts for 6 rounds when anyone other than its creator enters the area it is guarding or comes within 50 feet of the golem. This howl can be heard to a range of 100 feet. The pieces of a wood golem are assembled from blocks of fine wood and sprinkled with rare powders and crushed herbs worth at least 300 gp.

  • Wood Golem: HD 9 (40 hp); AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 slams (2d6); Move 12; Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Alarm, immunity to cold and electricity, double damage from fire

Source: Wood Golem from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gorbel

This bizarre creature is a small orb with reddish skin. Atop its round body are six eyestalks, each ending in a sapphire-colored eye. Dangling beneath its body are two stubby legs that end in claws. A gorbel is approximately 3 feet in diameter. Its reddish skin is a thin, tough and rubbery membrane. The spherical body of a gorbel is highly elastic and filled to near bursting with a lighter-than air flammable gas that smells of rotten eggs (sulfur). A gorbel eats, breathes, and excretes through an aperture best described as a mouth. This mouth is lined with a ring of sharp teeth that face inward to help it force food into its gullet.

A gorbel’s body is naturally buoyant. This buoyancy allows it to fly at a speed of 60 feet and also grants it a permanent feather fall effect.

When a gorbel is hit with a weapon, spell, or effect that deals piercing or slashing damage it must succeed on a saving throw or explode, dealing 1d4 points of damage to all creatures within 5 feet. This instantly kills the gorbel.

  • Gorbel: HD 2; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), bite (1d5); Move 3/24 (flying); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Explosion, cannot be surprised, only harmed by sharp weapons.

Source: Gorbel from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Andrew Key.

Gorgimera

A gorgimera is a chimerical creature akin to the standard chimera. A gorgimera has the heads of a lion, dragon, and gorgon. A gorgimera’s dragon head can be that of any of the chaotic dragons (see below). It has the hindquarters of a gorgon and the forequarters of lion. It is a highly territorial predator whose hunting range often covers several square miles around its lair. The creature makes its home inside caves high atop mountains or deep inside caverns. A typical lair contains a mated pair and one or two young.

A gorgimera has two breath weapons, each of which can be used independently of the other (thus it can breathe twice in a given round as a standard action). A gorgimera’s dragon head breath weapon depends on the color of its dragon head, as summarized on the table below. Regardless of its type, a gorgimera’s breath weapon is usable once every 1d4 rounds, deals 3d8 points of damage and allows a saving throw for half damage. To determine a gorgimera’s head color and breath weapon randomly, roll 1d10 and consult the table below.

d10 Head
1-2 Black Dragon Head 40-foot line of acid for breath weapon
3-4 Blue Dragon Head 40-foot line of lightning for breath weapon
5-6 Green Dragon Head 20-foot cone of corrosive gas for breath weapon
7-8 Red Dragon Head 20-foot cone of fire for breath weapon
9-10 White Dragon Head 20-foot cone of cold for breath weapon

A gorgimera’s gorgon head breath weapon is usable once every 1d4 rounds (no more than twice per day), turns a creature to stone permanently, and allows a saving throw to avoid. The breath weapon is a cone 30 feet long and 20 feet wide at the base.

  • Gorgimera: HD 10; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 bites (1d10), butt (1d8), 2 claws (1d6); Move 15/18 (flying); Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: breath weapon.

Source: Gorgimera from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Gorgon

Gorgons are bull-like creatures with dragon-like scales. Their breath turns people to stone (60 ft. range, saving throw applies).

  • Gorgon: HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 gore (2d6); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Breath turns to stone.

Source: Monstrosities

Gorgon, True

Though the word gorgon is often associated with the deadly bull-like creature that turns a victim to stone with its breath weapon, the true gorgons are three sisters; Euryale, Sthenno, and Medusa. They are the daughters of the god Phorcys and the goddess Ceto. Euryale and Sthenno were born immortal and are hideous creatures with writing snakes for hair, brass claws, wings, and a gaze that can turn any living creature into stone. Phorcys tasked them with guarding the entrance to the Underworld.

Medusa was born mortal and was very beautiful. Phorcys sent her to the Material Plane so all could gaze upon the beauty of his daughter. Medusa’s beauty rivaled that of some of the goddesses, and some of them grew jealous of Medusa, particularly the goddess Athena. Her beauty also turned the heads of some of the gods, and when Poseidon seduced her in a temple to Athena, the goddess became enraged and changed the beautiful Medusa into a creature as hideous as her sisters. Poseidon turned from his love, never to return again. Medusa, enraged, fled into the desert and never came back to civilization.

The hero Perseus was tasked with killing the gorgon known as Medusa and bringing her head to King Polydectes as a wedding present. Using a magic shield given to him by the gods, he avoided Medusa’s deadly gaze and severed her head. From her serpentine body sprang the children of Poseidon, creatures similar in appearance to their mother. These creatures escaped into the world and are called medusa.

Sthenno and Euryale long for their sister’s return or their meeting with her in the Underworld. Yet being immortal, they cannot enter the Realm of the Dead. Thus, both know they will never see their beloved sibling again. Their cries are said to be audible on the wind as a high-pitched shrill akin to a bird’s cry.

The sisters’ gaze turns people to stone permanently. The poisonous bites of their snakes are deadly (i.e. pass a saving throw or die).

Sthenno and Euryale are immune to polymorph, sleep, stunning and paralysis.

  • Sthenno: HD 18 (75 hp); AC -1 [20]; Atk 2 claws (1d10), bite (1d8), snakes (1d6 plus poison); Move 12/21(flying); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 26/6200; Special: Petrifying gaze, poison, +2 or better weapon to hit, regenerate (2 hp/rd), immortal, immunities, magic resistance (60%)
  • Euryale: HD 20 (80 hp); AC -2 [21]; Atk 2 claws (1d10), bite (1d8), snakes (1d6 plus poison); Move 12/21(flying); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 28/6800; Special: Petrifying gaze, poison, +2 or better weapon to hit, regenerate (2 hp/rd), immortal, immunities, magic resistance (65%)

Source: True Gorgon from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gorilla Bear

Gorilla bears are the result of a magical crossbreeding and merging of two distinct species: a gorilla and a black bear. A gorilla bear’s fur is always dark and ranges in color from jet black to brownish-black. Its paws and feet end in elongated nails, brown in color. A typical gorilla bear stands 8 feet tall and weighs almost 1,700 pounds. Its eyes are always one of two colors: crimson or emerald green. No other eye color has ever been seen on a gorilla bear (though legends speak of an immensely powerful white-furred gorilla bear with eyes the color of amethysts). Gorilla bears make their lairs in caves or caverns, often hidden among the twisted tangle of trees and shrubs of jungles. They are diurnal hunters and feast on a diet of meat, savoring the taste of goblins and elves. A typical lair contains a mated pair and 1d4 young. A gorilla bear that hits a victim with both claw attacks squeezes them for 1d8+1 points of damage.

  • Gorilla Bear: HD 4; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d8), bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Squeeze.

Source: Gorilla Bear from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Cricky Hitchcock.

Grave Risen

Grave risen are rotting, worm-ridden, walking corpses draped in tattered and loosely fitting rags or outfitted in dented and rusted armor. Blackened eye sockets grant it sight and its body still clings to the stench of death. The clawed hands of a grave risen are filthy; its nails long and caked with dirt and soil from its grave. Once per day, a grave risen can animate up to 10 HD of corpses within 100 feet as zombies. A grave risen’s claws are coated with a deadly poison that infects the blood.

  • Grave Risen: HD 4; AC 8 [11] 7 [12] with shield; Atk 2 claws (1d4+2 + blood poisoning); Move 6; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Animate dead, blood poisoning.

Source: Grave Risen from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Gravebird

Gravebirds are highly intelligent undead birds (usually ravens or crows) that have been brought back to life through foul magic. Any creature wounded by a Gravebird must make a successful saving throw or contract Grave Fever, a disease similar to Mummy Rot, which prevents magical healing and causes wounds to heal at one-tenth of the normal rate. A cure disease spell will remove the fever. Gravebirds can Speak with the Dead (as per the spell) three times daily. (Author: Andrew Trent)

  • Gravebird: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d4) or 2 claws (1d3); Move 4 (Fly 16); Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 3/120; Special: Disease upon successful hit (save applies), Speak with the Dead.

Source: Monstrosities

Gray Nisp

Gray nisps resemble hairless humanoids with smooth, slick skin; their hands and feet are webbed and end in claws, and their faces have large, dark pupiless eyes. They have no noses or ears, and its small fishlike mouth is filled with tiny, sharp teeth. Gray nisps are 9 feet tall, with light gray skin and a white underbelly, and weighs well over 300 pounds. If a gray nisp hits with both claws, it rends for an additional 2d6 points of damage. A gray nisp cannot survive on dry land.

  • Gray Nisp: HD 8; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), bite (1d8); Move 6/18 (swim); Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Rend

Source: Gray Nisp from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Graymalkins

Graymalkins are magical creatures that resemble ordinary cats. To the casual observer, a graymalkin appear to be nothing more than a raggedy-looking cat with nothing unusual about it. This disguise aids the graymalkin in its travels, allowing it to move unmolested among living creatures.

Graymalkins always dwell near populated areas, preferring cities to towns, towns to villages, and so on. They often choose an owner (a living creature they deem gullible and easily manipulated) and convince that creature to take them home with them (by using their fascination ability). Once inside their owner’s house, a graymalkin uses its special abilities to kill its owner and any other family members. Such attacks usually occur at night (in the case of the slinker) or over a period of time (in the case of the tether).

Graymalkins are often found serving as the familiar to an evil spellcaster or hag. They prefer females to males when serving as a familiar and very rarely do they ever use their special abilities against their true owner. (Some tales say that when a graymalkin is serving as a familiar, its master is actually immune to its special abilities.)

Graymalkins avoid direct confrontations with opponents, preferring to attack helpless or otherwise unobservant foes. If forced into battle, a graymalkin seeks escape as quick as possible.

Common Graymalkin

Graymalkins are magical creatures that resemble ordinary cats. A graymalkin can attempt to charm a single opponent. The target can make a successful save to resist the attempt. Graymalkins are magical creatures that resemble ordinary cats. They appear to be nothing more than a raggedy-looking cat with nothing unusual about it. This disguise aids the graymalkin in its travels, allowing it to move unmolested among living creatures. A graymalkin can fascinate a single opponent (save resists). A creature that fails its save “adopts” the graymalkin as a pet, clinging to the cat and always keeping it close by. The effect is similar to a charm person spell. Once inside their owner’s house, a graymalkin kills its owner and any family members.

  • Common Graymalkin: HD 1d4 hit points; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1 point of damage); Move 10; Save 18; AL C; CL/XP A/5; Special: charm.

Source: Common Graymalkin from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Slinker Graymalkin

A slinker is referred to in legend as a witch cat, hell cat, or demonic cat that creeps into a family’s house and steals the breath from their sleeping children. It appears as a large graymalkin. A slinker can fascinate a single opponent (save resists). A creature that fails its save “adopts” the slinker as a pet, clinging to the cat and always keeping it close by. The effect is similar to a charm person spell. Once inside their owner’s house, a slinker kills its owner and any family members at night by sucking the air from their lungs as they sleep (save resists). If the save fails, the victim loses a quarter of its hit points. A successful save means the victim awakens, although it is still charmed.

  • Slinker Graymalkin: HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk 2 claws, 1 bite (1 point of damage each); Move 10; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 1/15; Special: breath stealing, fascination.

Source: Slinker Graymalkin from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Great Lantern Worm

Great Lantern Worms are huge megadriles that grow 100ft or more in length, exceeding ten feet in width. They are subterranean, chewing tunnels in rock before swelling to fit the tunnel. Almost their entire length is taken up by the empty stomach, with their organs on the exterior, covered by a tough membrane of earthen hue. At the rear of the worm’s long gut is a photophore, a light-emitting organ used as a lure for prey. Once the prey has travelled halfway down the stomach, the worm’s mouth will close and acid will be sprayed from various points along the gut wall, requiring a saving throw each round to dodge. Should the entrapped prey try to cut their way out, any weapon that succeeds in hitting the stomach wall has a chance of dissolving. The chance for a non-magic weapon to dissolve is 1 in 8, and for a magic weapon the chance is 1 in 12. Each time a weapon avoids being dissolved, +1 is added to the chance of dissolving upon the next hit. For example, if a magic weapon hits and is not dissolved, the chance of dissolving on the second hit is 2 in 12 rather than 1 in 12. If a victim manages to stay alive long enough to return to the mouth, he can attempt to force it open (1 in 6 chance to succeed, +1 per helper). Victims are digested within hours. (Author: Sean Wills)

  • Great Lantern Worm: HD 30; AC 7 [12]; Atk Acid spray (3d4) Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 30/8400 ; Special: acid spray, swallow whole.

Source: Monstrosities

Green Brain

Green brains are plant-creatures grown by the Shrooms (and possibly by other malevolent races with aptitudes for magically altering and breeding plants). Green brains are relatively intelligent, and are generally used to supervise and oversee the activities of mindless or semi-intelligent creatures using their powers of mental communication. In general, the supervised species will be plant-creatures of some kind, but it is possible for a green brain to act somewhat less effectively as the overseer for brutish humanoids or other non-plant creatures.

Green brains are able to project mental commands and communications at a deep enough level that the brain’s demands are clear even to mindless creatures such as oozes or monstrous plants. Indeed, the less intelligent the recipient of the orders, the stronger the green brain’s hold over it.

In addition to telepathic communication, a green brain can use its mental powers as a weapon when necessary. A green brain is able to continuously project a cone of mental force 50ft long and widening to 30ft at the end, which has the following effects: (1) any spells being cast are disrupted, although they are not lost from the caster’s memory, (2) anyone failing a saving throw within the cone becomes somewhat disoriented, making attacks at a penalty of -2 (duration 1d3 rounds) and having a 1 in 6 chance to drop any item held in the hands. The green brain may also narrow its mental focus to project a beam of concentrated, damaging thought, inflicting 2d6 points of damage to any single individual who fails a saving throw. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Green Brain: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk None; Move (Fly 15); Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 6/4400 ; Special: Mental attacks.

Source: Monstrosities

Green Slime

Green slime isn’t technically a monster, just an extremely dangerous hazard in underground tombs and other such places. Any metal or organic substance it touches begins to turn to green slime (saving throw). It can be killed with fire or extreme cold, and the transformation process can be arrested by the use of a cure disease spell.

Source: Monstrosities

Gremlin

Gremlins are wicked faerie folk who revel in destruction and mayhem. They resemble a goblin with long floppy ears, pinched wrinkled faces, nasty claws, a mouth full of sharp teeth and a wicked glint to its eyes. A gremlin stands 3-1/2 feet tall and weighs about 40 pounds. Bright light blinds gremlins for 1 turn. They do an additional 1d6 points of damage to surprised opponents. Gremlins can turn invisible at will.

  • Gremlin: HD 1d6 hit points; AC 9 [10]; Atk 2 claws (1d2), 1 bite (1d2) or 1 weapon (1d4); Move 10; Save 18; AL C; CL/XP B/10; Special: Magic resistance (15%), +1 magic weapon needed to hit, invisible

Source: Gremlin from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Grey Ooze

Grey ooze is almost identical in appearance to wet rock, but it is a slimy, formless substance that devours prey and carrion with its acidic secretions, lashing out to strike enemies. Grey ooze is immune to spells, heat, and cold damage. Metal (but not stone or wood) must make a saving throw vs. acid when exposed to grey ooze (even if the contact is as brief as the strike of a sword) or be rotted through. When the grey ooze hits a character in metal armor, the armor must make an item saving throw. Only cutting and piercing damages a grey ooze—it is impervious to blunt or crushing attacks.

  • Grey Ooze: HD 3; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 strike (2d6); Move 1; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Acid, immune to spells, heat, cold, and blunt weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Grick

Gricks resemble massive, human-sized worms with 4 tentacles surrounding a beaked mouth. They rear up to attack, focusing on one opponent at a time. They do not immediately try to feed on dying prey, but if given the chance they will drag unconscious or dead bodies into their lairs to feed. Blunt weapons do not harm them, due to their thick hides and resilient flesh.

  • Grick: HD 2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 4 tentacles (1d3), 1 beak (1d2); Move 6; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Immune to blunt weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Griffon

Griffons have the body of a lion, with the head, fore-claws, and wings of an eagle. These creatures can be tamed and ridden as mounts. They usually nest in high mountain aeries, where they lay their eggs and hunt their prey. Because the fledglings can be tamed, young griffons and griffon eggs command a very high price in the marketplaces of the great cities, or to noble lords and wizards.

  • Griffon: HD 7; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), 1 bite (2d8); Move 12 (Fly 27); Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Grimm

This monstrous beast stands well over 9 feet tall and has glistening black flesh. Its head is oval with deep sunken black eyes. Its mouth is wide and large and sports double rows of razor-sharp fangs. A purplish-black tongue flicks in and out of its mouth. The monster’s powerful arms and legs end in filthy wicked claws that sport broken, black fingernails. A grimm stands 9 feet tall and weighs more than 1,200 pounds. A grimm drains life from Lawful creatures, dealing 1d6 points of damage each round.

  • Grimm: HD 12; AC 0 [19]; Atk 2 claws (1d8), 1 bite (2d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Magic resistance (35%), +1 magic weapons or better needed to hit, death aura

Source: Grimm from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Grimstalker (Banaan)

The grimstalker is a fey creature that does not share the beauty and goodness of its kin. They are hairless humanoid fey, slender and graceful, with long arms and legs. The grimstalker’s skin is brown and woody, almost having the texture and hardness of tree bark, and their hands are tipped in sharp claws that drip toxic venom with the consistency of pinesap. They often decorate themselves with leaves and vines that actually take root in their skin and cover them with a protective layer as thick as leather armor. Grimstalkers deliver a paralytic poison with each claw attack that stuns victims for 1d4+1 rounds. Grimstalkers can cast plant growth and warp wood three times per day.

  • Grimstalker: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4+1 + poison) or 1 weapon (1d6+1); Move 6/3 (climbing); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Poison, spell-like abilities

Source: Grimstalker from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Grippli

Gripplis are short, bipedal tree frogs that dwell in swamps and marshes. They can move upright or on all fours. A grippli stands 2 to 2-1/2 feet tall and weighs from 40 to 50 pounds. Its eyes are yellow with vertical-slit pupils of black. Gripplis often wear brightly colored or decorated clothes. They are attracted to and love brightly colored items. Gripplis speak their own language and some speak common or elven. Gripplis can move across marshlands, swamps, and mud without any penalty to their movement.

Grippli characters can take levels in fighter (up to 5th level) or thief (up to 7th level). They can see in the dark as well as elves and enjoy a +5% bonus to climb walls (maximum 99%).

  • Grippli: HD 1; AC 6 [13]; Atk Weapon (1d4); Move 12/12 (climbing); Save 17 AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Marsh move.

Source: Grippli from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Groaning Spirit

The groaning spirit is the malevolent spirit of a female elf that is found haunting swamps, fens, moors, and other desolate places. Groaning spirits hate the living and seek to destroy whomever they meet. A groaning spirit appears as a translucent image of her former self.

Anyone viewing a groaning spirit must succeed on a saving throw or flee in terror for 1d6+4 rounds. Damage caused by the groaning spirit’s touch attack sends a chilling cold through an opponent’s body. Any creature touched must succeed on a saving throw or suffer 1 point of Strength drain. Groaning spirits are the bane of other undead, and any undead they touch (except other groaning spirits) must succeed on a saving throw or flee in fear for 2d6 rounds.

Once per day, at night only, a groaning spirit can release a death wail audible to a range of 1 mile. All creatures within 30 feet of the groaning spirit must make a successful saving throw or die. Those that make their save still take 3d6 points of damage.

If a spellcaster uses holy word against a groaning spirit, the creature must succeed on a saving throw or die immediately.

  • Groaning Spirit: HD 7; AC 2 [17]; Atk Incorporeal touch (1d8 + chill touch); Move 12; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Chill touch, fear aura, keening, immunity to cold and electricity, magic resistance (50%), unnatural aura, vulnerability

Source: Groaning Spirit from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Gronk

Gronks are the typical big, dumb brutes; a male gronk is on average approximately 9 feet tall, with females only slightly smaller. Gronks have mottled gray skin and shaggy brown hair that is thickest at its head and shoulders and gradually thins out around its waist. The arms and legs of a gronk are massive, like tree limbs attached to its thick barrel-like torso. The face of a gronk seems almost lost amid the long hair hanging from its head. The most notable feature of a gronk’s face is the long, rhinoceros-like horn between its eyes.

  • Gronk: HD 5; AC 8 [11]; Atk 2 slams (1d6) and horn (1d8), or 1 weapon (1d8) and horn (1d8); Move 12; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: None

Source: Gronk from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Growling Shadow

Growling shadows are spirit creatures that inhabit darkness and shadow, usually underground but in some cases in dark forests as well. Their presence will immediately be noticed, for they make growling sounds that seem to come from several directions at one time. A growling shadow materializes and vanishes from place to place when attacking, selecting a single victim at a time. Each round, the shadow will appear in front of a randomly determined opponent and attack, disappearing again so swiftly that only the one character being attacked has the opportunity to strike back. The shadow’s attack automatically deals one hit point of damage without the need to make a to-hit roll; if it is not killed before it has inflicted 10 hit points it will retreat, sated, back into the shadows whence it came. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Growling Shadow: HD 2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1 hp, automatic); Move 12; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Automatic damage, vanishing.

Source: Monstrosities

Grue (1)

A grue is a nasty, large thing with dark grey or green skin, rather like a half-filled water balloon ten feet long, with a huge mouth. Inside its leathery skin, the grue is mostly gelatinous. Grues cannot coexist with light; if they are exposed to a light source, they instantly recede with the darkness. In the dark, however, they are dangerous. If a grue hits with a natural roll of 20 on its attack die, it swallows the victim whole; which will satisfy the grue, and it will leave if it is permitted to do so (the swallowed victim will suffocate in 2d4 rounds and then be digested). They are non-intelligent, and are immune to blunt and piercing weapons (e.g., clubs, maces, arrows, spears). Swords, axes, and other cutting weapons inflict normal damage. Grues can magically extinguish one normal light source per round at a distance of 100ft. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Grue: HD 9; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 9; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: immune to blunt and piercing weapons, extinguish normal lights, swallow whole.

Source: Monstrosities

Grue (2)

Found in the darkest recesses of dungeons or in the deepest corners of attics, grues are the essence of Chaos and Darkness given form by evil and a ravenous appetite for living souls. Grues have no specific shape or form, save for the ravening, slavering jaws that close around the unsuspecting, or those who would venture into the darkness without a torch or match in their inventory. Grues are chaotic spirits that exist in a 10ft x 10ft area of pure darkness. Any light source brought into that same area forces the grue to flee to the nearest dark area. Any creature within the area of darkness is subject to attack by the grue’s jaws. For all intents and purposes, grues are invisible to anyone within the area of darkness, but outside of the area, a grue looks like “living darkness.” Grues are only affected by magical weapons or weapons that emit light of some kind, including a torch (which would act like a club). They are resistant to all spell attacks, save those that have some sort of light component (a light spell, prismatic spray or even fireball). Grues can magically extinguish one normal light source per round at a distance of 100ft. A grue’s attack will replenish its hit points with any hit points “eaten” from its victims. A grue cannot replenish beyond its starting hit points. Anyone killed by a grue will vanish, including all of his equipment. In 1d4 days, he will become a grue. (Author: Chgowiz)

  • Grue: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: immune to all but light/magic weapons and spells with light component/effect, can extinguish lights w/in 100ft, restores own HP with damage caused to victims.

Source: Monstrosities

Gryph

Gronks are the typical big, dumb brutes; a male gronk is on average approximately 9 feet tall, with females only slightly smaller. Gronks have mottled gray skin and shaggy brown hair that is thickest at its head and shoulders and gradually thins out around its waist. The arms and legs of a gronk are massive, like tree limbs attached to its thick barrel-like torso. The face of a gronk seems almost lost amid the long hair hanging from its head. The most notable feature of a gronk’s face is the long, rhinoceros-like horn between its eyes.

  • Gryph: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk Touch (attach) or beak (1d8); Move 3/21 (flying); Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Attach, implant eggs.

Source: Gryph from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Peter Brown.

Gump

Gumps are large and blubbery humanoids with an overly broad jagged toothed grin and a pair of small, deep-set eyes in an otherwise featureless face. Gumps are motivated by hunger and the deep down joy they feel when murdering a helpless foe. Anyone meeting the gaze of a gump must save vs. paralysis at +2 or be held in place for 2-5 rounds (fighting without looking incurs a -4 penalty to-hit). It is safe to view a gump’s reflection in a mirror or other reflective surface. The gump is able to squint in an odd manner which keeps it from paralyzing an ally. (Author: JD Jarvis)

  • Gump: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6+2); Move 9; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Gaze attack paralyzes (+2 save).

Source: Monstrosities

Gutslug

A gutslug is a slimy, sticky worm that resembles entrails. The body is a lumpy, veined, gray tube approximately 10 feet long but usually no thicker than an inch in diameter. Gutslugs have no eyes, and their mouth is large, round, and resembles the suckered mouth of a leech. A gutslug latches onto a victim with a successful bite, automatically draining blood for 1d4 points of damage each round until it drains a total of 8 hit points or is removed.

  • Gutslug: HD 2; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bite (1d4 + blood drain); Move 6/12 (flying); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Blood rain.

Source: Gutslug from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Gwurrum

An eerie green mist seeps through the trees at twilight, stealing up to the houses of those who have failed to leave an offering to the faerie folk of the woods. It is the gwurrum, monstrous servant of the faerie court, come to pay a visit.

The gwurrum is composed of equal parts choking mist and thirst for blood. It can force its way through the tiniest cracks in any barrier, crawl uphill, and pour down chimneys and throats like cold water. The misty body is roughly 10 ft. in diameter, and its trailing tendrils can reach up to 10ft from its form. Any and all targets within range will be attacked, though if free to choose, the faerie monster will focus upon children and small animals: those whose loss will cause the greatest sorrow and misery in the punished community. Dim-witted and malicious, it can be distracted by offerings of whiskey, recitations of poetry extolling the virtues of the faerie-folk, and the singing of an unbroken voice. Iron objects cause an additional 1d6 points of damage to the gwurrum (the mere touch of iron causes 1d6 points), but these items will turn to dust within 1 round after contact with the gwurrum. The faerie monster is otherwise immune to fire, electrical, poison, or mind-affecting attacks. Any creature with magical singing abilities, such as a harpy or bard, can keep a gwurrum at bay for 1 round per hit dice or level. A gwurrum is affected by Protection from Evil, and cannot attack anyone who is thoroughly drunk.

In the morning, when a gwurrum departs, dead leaves will be found scattered around the dwelling of anyone it attacked. Children who survive the attack of a gwurrum may, upon growing up, pass freely into the faerie realms. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Gwurrum: HD 9; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 per target in 10 ft. reach (1d8/round); Move 6; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: immunities.

Source: Monstrosities