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Monster Details H through J




Monster Details H through J

Hags

Annis Hag

Annis Hags are giantesses, horrid looking females as large as ogres. They lust for human flesh to eat, and often polymorph themselves into human form to hunt (an old lady being a common shape), or to lure their prey from places of safety. Strong as a bear, the annis can attack in similar fashion; if she hits with both claws, the victim is held and the annis inflicts automatic damage with all three attacks thereafter. The victim isn’t helpless, but cannot break free unless he is as strong as a giant. Annis are somewhat magical; they can summon mists to hide themselves and their rank lairs; some are also witches with the ability to cast spells (such being left to the Referee’s determination, if witch-hags are to be encountered).

  • Annis: HD 8; AC 1 [18]; Atk 2 claws (2d8), 1 bite (1d8); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Hug and rend, polymorph, call mists.

Source: Monstrosities

Mountain Hag (Yama-Uba)

The mountain hags (“Yama-uba” in Asian-type settings) are solitary, horrid looking blue-skinned females as large as ogres. They live in mountainous regions and near passes where they can hunt for food. Mountain hags feast on all manner of flesh; but they prefer humans, attacking with their long claws and wicked mouths that stretch from ear to ear. (Author: Mike Davison)

  • Mountain Hag/Yama-uba: HD 7; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), 1 bite (1d8); Move 12; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Sea Hag

The sea hag is a giantess much like the annis, but living in the seas, or in fetid, salt-water marshes. These hags are so hideous that the sight of their faces causes weakness from fright and horror; if the victim fails a saving throw, his strength ability score is reduced by one-half for 1d6 full turns. The hag can also cast an evil eye upon those she chooses to slay; but only three times per day. The range of this deadly gaze is 30ft, and the hag’s eye need not be met in order for death to occur (saving throw). Like the annis, sea hags feast with gusto upon human flesh.

  • Sea Hag: HD 3; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 6 (Swim 18); Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Death gaze, weakness gaze.

Source: Monstrosities

Half-Ogre

Half-ogres are rare crossbreeds of human and ogre. Standing a few feet shorter than their ogre kin and a few feet taller than their human kin, half-ogres have strength as well as speed and intelligence (relative to other ogres) in their favor. Their skin and hair color generally match that of their ogre parent, with dark tones such as gray, brown, or olive being the most prevalent. Half-ogres speak the common tongue, and those with an intelligence score of at least 10 also speak ogre.

Half-ogres, though generally outcasts among humans and feared for their ugliness and size, can find some acceptance among ogres. Half-ogres in an ogre band need to prove themselves constantly to their larger kin, however. For this reason, half-ogres found among an ogre band are cruel, violent, and strong; weaker half-ogres usually wind up in the stew pot. Most half-ogres found among full-blooded ogres are leaders of the ogre band or are at least well on their way to becoming leaders. Their long years suffering the harsh treatment of their kin help half-ogres develop a sense of cunning and a strong will to survive. Therefore, ogres under the leadership of a half-ogre fight more effectively, even engaging in planned ambushes and complicated tactics that are beyond most ogres.

On rare occasions, half-ogres collect into hybrid communities of other half-ogre races (such as orogs and ogrillons) or humanoids (such as orcs and half-orcs). These rogue bands of outcasts form bandit clans or marauding groups that are the bane of other humanoid communities in their area.

Half-Ogres as Characters

Half-ogre leaders tend to be barbaric fighters and can advance to the 6th level of ability (7th level if their strength score is 13 or higher). Half-ogre clerics worship “the Destroyer” and can advance to the 4th level of ability (5th level if their wisdom is 15 or higher). Half-ogres can also multi-class as fighter/clerics, reaching a maximum of 5th level as fighters and 3rd level as clerics.

Half-Ogre enjoy a +1 bonus to strength and constitution and a -1 penalty to intelligence and charisma at character creation. These modifications cannot take an ability score over 18 or below 3.

Half-ogres begin their careers with one additional hit dice (1d6).

Half-ogres can see in darkness as well as a dwarf.

  • Half-Ogre: HD 2; AC 4 [15]; Atk Two-handed sword (2d6+1) or spear (1d6+1); Move 16; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None

Source: Half-Ogre from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Erica Balsley, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Hamster, Giant

Giant hamsters are larger, more aggressive relatives of the normal hamster. Like their smaller cousins, they come in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes. Giant hamsters are omnivorous, but prefer to feast on a diet of grains, berries, nuts, and water. On occasion, they indulge in and eat meat, usually insects and the like. Also like its smaller cousin, the giant hamster can store food in its cheek pouches. The average giant hamster can store about 200 pounds of food at any given time. Giant hamsters normally shun combat, but if cornered or extremely hungry they may attack. Note that even domesticated giant hamsters attack if their young are threatened. The giant hamster attacks by biting with its long, sharp teeth. A giant hamster can try to stuff a grabbed opponent of dwarf size or smaller into its cheek pouch by making a successful bite attack. The victim gets a saving throw to avoid being grabbed. A creature stuffed into the giant hamster’s cheek pouch takes no damage, and can escape by making a successful open doors check or can cut its way out by using a light slashing or piercing weapon to deal 10 points of damage to the cheek (AC 8 [11]). A giant hamster’s cheek can hold 1 dwarf or halfling.

  • Giant Hamster: HD 4; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 9/6 (burrowing); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Cheek pouch, grab, immunity to disease

Source: Hamster, giant from The Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, by Frog God Games.

Hanged Man

A hanged man appears much as it did in life, though its skin is pale and pulled tight over its bones. Its head hangs at an odd angle, unsupported by its shattered neck bones. A rotted noose and several feet of rope hang from its neck and trail off behind it as it walks. Its eyes have no pupils. A hanged man can only utter choked gurgles, gasps and strangled moans. It uses the rope that killed it to snare victims and drag them into the hanged man’s waiting claws. The rope can be cast up to 20 feet away, and wraps around creatures with a successful hit.

  • Hanged Man: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d4); Move 6; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Hangman’s rope

Source: Hanged Man from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Hangman Tree

Hangman trees look like nothing more than giant oak trees. Close inspection reveals a scar-like marking on the lower part of the trunk (this is where undigested creatures or gear is expelled after digestion). Hidden among the hangman tree’s branches and leaves are its rope-like appendages that it uses to trap its prey. Hangman trees can speak broken Common. The hangman tree attacks by dropping its noose-like appendages around prey and yanking victims upwards. Trapped prey is held until it dies or is dropped into the hangman’s trunk where it is digested. Hangman trees have no visual organs but can ascertain all foes within 60 feet using sound, scent, and vibration.

Opponents struck by a vine in combat must pass a saving throw or be strangled for 1d6+1 points of damage per round until the vine is cut (it has an AC of 4 [15] and can take 6 hp damage) or the strangled victim or a rescuer makes a successful open doors check. The hangman tree can attempt to swallow a strangling (or strangled) victim with a successful attack roll and a failed saving throw by the target. A swallowed victim suffers 2d6 points of crushing damage per round and can only escape with a successful open doors check. The tree’s trunk can hold up to two human-sized victims.

Besides the danger of its vines and trunk, a hangman tree can also release a cloud of spores in a 50-foot radius spread. Creatures in the area must succeed on a saving throw or believe the tree to be of some ordinary sort or to be a treant or other such friendly tree creature. An affected creature becomes passive for 2d6 rounds and refuses to attack the hangman tree during this time.

A hangman tree takes half again as much (+50%) damage as normal from electricity, regardless of whether a saving throw is allowed, or if the save is a success or failure. Cold-based effects paralyze a hangman tree as if by a hold monster spell. Spells that generate darkness slow the hangman tree (as the slow spell) for 1 round per caster level.

  • Hangman Tree: HD 8; AC 2 [17]; Atk 4 vines (1d8); Move 3; Save 8; AL N (with chaotic tendencies); CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Hallucinatory spores, magic resistance (45%), strangle, swallow, surprise on 1-4 on 1d6

Source: Hangman Tree from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Harpy

Harpies have the upper body of a human female and the lower body and wings of a vulture. Their song is a charm that draws its victims to the harpy (saving throw applies), and the harpy’s touch casts the equivalent of a charm person spell (again, saving throw applies).

  • Harpy: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 talons (1d3) and weapon (1d6); Move 6 (Fly 18); Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Flight, siren-song.

Source: Monstrosities

Haunt

Hangman trees look like nothing more than giant oak trees. Close inspection reveals a scar-like marking on the lower part of the trunk (this is where undigested creatures or gear is expelled after digestion). Hidden among the hangman tree’s branches and leaves are its rope-like appendages that it uses to trap its prey. Hangman trees can speak broken Common. The hangman tree attacks by dropping its noose-like appendages around prey and yanking victims upwards. Trapped prey is held until it dies or is dropped into the hangman’s trunk where it is digested. Hangman trees have no visual organs but can ascertain all foes within 60 feet using sound, scent, and vibration.

Opponents struck by a vine in combat must pass a saving throw or be strangled for 1d6+1 points of damage per round until the vine is cut (it has an AC of 4 [15] and can take 6 hp damage) or the strangled victim or a rescuer makes a successful open doors check. The hangman tree can attempt to swallow a strangling (or strangled) victim with a successful attack roll and a failed saving throw by the target. A swallowed victim suffers 2d6 points of crushing damage per round and can only escape with a successful open doors check. The tree’s trunk can hold up to two human-sized victims.

Besides the danger of its vines and trunk, a hangman tree can also release a cloud of spores in a 50-foot radius spread. Creatures in the area must succeed on a saving throw or believe the tree to be of some ordinary sort or to be a treant or other such friendly tree creature. An affected creature becomes passive for 2d6 rounds and refuses to attack the hangman tree during this time.

A hangman tree takes half again as much (+50%) damage as normal from electricity, regardless of whether a saving throw is allowed, or if the save is a success or failure. Cold-based effects paralyze a hangman tree as if by a hold monster spell. Spells that generate darkness slow the hangman tree (as the slow spell) for 1 round per caster level.

  • Haunt: HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk Ghostly touch (1d4 plus 1d3 dexterity); Move 9/12 (flying); Save 12; AL Any (usually chaotic); CL/XP 8/800; Special: Alternate form, dexterity damage, immune to turning, malevolence, rejuvenation, strangle, vulnerabilities

Source: Haunt from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green, based on original material by Harold Johnson and Tom Moldvay.

Hawktoad

Hawktoads are levitating amphibians with the body of a very large toad but with long, clawed front legs and no back legs at all. The hind end of a hawktoad is a foot-long tail, like that of a tadpole; the full length of a hawktoad is three feet. These bizarre creatures move by lashing through the air with their tadpole-like tails, and attack by swooping in at opponents, scratching with their tiny claws and lashing out with their long tongues. A hawktoad’s tongue does no damage, but if the attack succeeds the tongue has whipped around the character’s neck. If this happens, the hawktoad lands at the back of the victim’s neck; it holds tight with its tiny claws and begins to strangle the opponent, using its muscular tongue as a garrotte. When a hawktoad is attached in this way, the strangling character will find it difficult to reach around and attack, of course.

Each round thereafter, the character must successfully roll a d20 under his constitution score or fall unconscious; each round a cumulative +1 is added to the d20 roll, making it harder and harder to avoid passing out. Once the character passes out, the toad strangles him to death in three rounds. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Hawktoad: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d2), tongue (strangles); Move 3 (Fly 12); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Strangling tongue.

Source: Monstrosities

Head-Stealer

A head-stealer is the headless, undead body of someone who has been decapitated, usually by execution or dungeon trap. The body is animated with a vengeful spirit, and seeks to re-enter society by removing someone else’s head and placing it atop its own neck. Although the head-stealer’s body remains in a relatively preserved state, its stolen heads continue to decay, and the head-stealer seeks to replace them on a regular basis. Although the head-stealer can animate its substitute heads, the unnatural grafting of dead flesh to undead flesh is highly imperfect. The head does not attach by magic, so the head-stealer is required to use a measure such as rope or nails to affix the new head. Moreover, the head stealer can only imprecisely animate a stolen head, and while it can cause speech to issue forth, the slurring and twitching will tend to raise suspicion. As with all undead creatures, the head stealer is immune to mind-affecting spells and vulnerable to holy water. The head stealer can be immediately destroyed by attaching the head it formerly possessed in life, if the head still exists. Any attack against the head stealer may dislodge the stolen head on a natural roll of 19 or 20, causing the head-stealer to attack at -1 until it can reattach the head or a replacement. If deprived of a head, it may try to rip one from the torso of an attacker. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Head-stealer: HD 3+4; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6) or strike (1d4); Move 12; Save 14; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Immune to sleep and charm.

Source: Monstrosities

Headless Hound

A headless hound appears to be a large black dog, but with an eerie green glow where the head should be. The creature’s flanks may be lined with scars or torn open, exposing faintly glowing bones and the absence of innards. The headless hound attacks with a ghostly bite that passes straight through clothing and armor to the flesh. The defender’s armor class is modified only by any Dexterity bonus. Bitten flesh heals at half normal rate unless magic is used. If five or more headless hounds are present, their howling requires a saving throw to avoid fleeing in fear (only required once). The headless hound takes half damage from normal weapons. Despite their spectral nature, headless hounds are not undead. However, they are immune to sleep, charm, and hold spells. They are more properly faerie-kin, and according to folklore will cease their haunting and join the wild hunt if it passes nearby. Anyone slain by a headless hound has a chance of returning from the grave as a shadow-like spirit, to be pursued nightly by the headless hound pack. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Headless Hound: HD 6; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 18 (Fly 6); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Bite passes through armor (only dex bonus modifies AC), half normal healing rate from wounds, fear, half damage from normal weapons, immune to sleep, charm, hold.

Source: Monstrosities

Helix Moth

Helix moths are 20-foot-long black insects with spiraling bands of red, green, yellow, blue, purple, and white on their abdomens. Their underbelly is white. Their large mandibles are gray, as are their legs. Three sets of translucent wings protrude from the insect’s body. A small black sword-like stinger protrudes from the end of the moth’s abdomen, capable of delivering a highly toxic poison. If the moth beats its wings, the droning sound is audible up to 60 feet away and causes confusion (as per the spell) in all who fail a save.

  • Helix Moth: HD 12; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (2d4), sting (2d6 + poison); Move 12/30 (flying); Save 2; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Immune to charm, drone, poison

Source: Helix Moth from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green

Helix Moth (Larva)

Helix moth larvae are 10-foot-long maggot-like creatures with rubbery gray flesh. Their cylindrical body is about 4 feet in diameter. Their entire body is coated in a thick, slimy mucous. Larvae have no eyes but use their other senses to detect prey. The mouth has two ridges along it that are formed of a hard, shell-like substance that function as teeth. Larvae lack most of the full-grown moth’s abilities, but their bite is still deadly and delivers a powerful regurgitated acid (1d6 damage). Once the larva bites, it grips the creature with its mouth, dealing automatic bite and acid damage until removed.

  • Helix Moth Larva: HD 5; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d8 + acid); Move 6; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Grab, acid

Source: Helix Moth from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green

Hell Moth

The hell moth looks like a giant gray moth with spiraling bands of red and black on its body. It has large, thin, reddish-hued wings. The hell moth is thought to have come from another plane, though sages are not quite sure of its exact origin. The hell moth attacks living creatures that wander too close to its lair. It otherwise resembles a large moth with an 8-foot wingspan.

A hell moth can try to wrap a human-sized or smaller creature in its body as a standard attack. If successful, it establishes a hold and bites the engulfed victim with a +2 bonus on its attack roll. Attacks that hit an engulfing hell moth deal half their damage to the monster and half to the trapped victim. A hell moth that has engulfed an opponent can detonate its body in a blast of hellish fire that deals 6d10 points of fire damage to itself and to the engulfed opponent (no save). Remember to reduce the damage dealt to the hell moth due to its fire resistance. A hell moth can immolate itself once every 3 hours, providing it survives the immolation. Creatures within 10 feet of the hell moth when it uses this ability must succeed on a saving throw or take 1d8 points of fire damage as clothes and combustibles ignite. The damage continues for another 1d4+4 rounds after the hell moth uses this ability or until the fire is extinguished.

  • Hell Moth: HD 9; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 6/15 (flying); Save 6; AL N (with chaotic tendencies); CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Engulf, immolation, resistance to fire (90%)

Source: Helix Moth from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green

Hellcat

These creatures are demonic felines, often kept as pets by the denizens of the netherworlds. In some cases, they may find their way to the material planes, either by being summoned or by being sent there to serve as the ally (or tempter) of a Chaotic villain who has made a pact with the powers of darkness.

Hellcats cannot be seen in the light, and even in the darkness they are little more than a feline shape limned in strange shadow, the size of a leopard or other great cat. Like most cats of demonic persuasion or not, hellcats can be fickle in their allegiance; a hellcat may change its preferred “master,” attaching itself to a particularly Chaotic individual in preference to its original one. Most hellcats encountered on the Material Planes are female; the tomcats are rare, larger, and less capable of traveling from one plane of existence to another.

  • Hellcat: HD 7; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (2d6) and 2 claws (1d4+1); Move 12; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Hit only by magical weapons, 20% magic resistance.

Source: Monstrosities

Hellhound

Hell hounds are fire-breathing dogs of the underworlds or lower planes. In addition to biting, they can breathe fire each round, inflicting 2hp damage per hit die (10 ft. range, saving throw for half damage).

  • Hell Hound (4 HD): HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Breathe fire (8hp).
  • Hell Hound (5 HD): HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Breathe fire (10hp).
  • Hell Hound (6 HD): HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Breathe fire (12hp).
  • Hell Hound (7 HD): HD 7; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Breathe fire (14hp).

Source: Monstrosities

Herald of Tsathogga

A herald of Tsathogga is a gigantic pale yellow-green frog with oversized monstrous eyes. In place of its legs and forelimbs are many long, writhing tentacles it uses to pull itself along the ground. The body of the thing resembles that of a massive toad. These tentacles are covered in tiny lancets that inject paralytic venom. A herald can bellow once ever 1d4 rounds in one of two ways: one sound is a trilling croak that deafens all opponents within 30 feet (save avoids), while the other is a directed sound that targets one foe within 100 feet for 4d6 points of damage (save for half). If a herald of Tsathogga rolls a natural 20 on its bite attack, it swallows its opponent whole for 3d6 points of damage per round. A herald regenerates 5 hit points per round.

  • Herald of Tsathogga: HD 14; AC 1 [18]; Atk 10 tentacles (1d8) and 1 bite (2d6); Move 6/9 (swimming); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Bellow, paralysis, swallow whole, regenerate, half damage from blunt weapons

Source: Herald of Tsathogga from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Green and Erica Balsley.

Hieroglyphicroc

Raised by ancient methods long forgotten or suppressed, hieroglyphicrocs resemble zombie crocodiles, but they are actually more akin to mummies than to zombies, at least in terms of the preservation process. Their eyes glow with a yellow light, and they have rudimentary intelligence – often they are defenders of tombs where mummies are found. These creatures are highly immune to being turned, and attack with a bite that can swallow whole on a natural 20. It takes three rounds to completely swallow a victim, but the victim will turn into a zombie within 1d4+1 rounds after being swallowed. Then the hieroglyphicroc will disgorge it. The bite inflicts 2d6 damage. The dead skin of these creatures is often painted with hieroglyphs. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Hieroglyphicroc: HD 7; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 9; Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: swallow whole on natural 20, transform stomach contents into zombie.

Source: Monstrosities

Hippocampus

The hippocampus is a mythical sea-horse, with the body, head, and forelegs of a horse, but with the rear part of the body tapering to a fish’s tail. They are at least as intelligent as a normal land-horse. Some leaders might be extremely intelligent indeed.

  • Hippocampus: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move (Swim 24); Save 13; AL L; CL/XP 4/120; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Hippocampus (II)

A hippocampus is often called a merhorse or sea horse, for it is indeed a half-horse/half-fish creature of the sea. The hindquarters of the animal are that of a great fish. Its body is covered in fine scales in the fore parts and large scales elsewhere. The hippocampus’ scales vary in color from ivory to deep green, with shades of blue and silver. Aquatic races often tame these animals, and they make fine steeds, for they are strong, swift, and very intelligent. A hippocampus is about 8 feet long and weighs about 600 pounds. Hippocampuses speak the language of merfolk and tritons, and about 10% speak common. Though they are unable to move on land, a hippocampus can breathe air and survive out of the water for 15 minutes.

Training a Hippocampus

A hippocampus requires training before it can bear a rider in combat. To be trained, a hippocampus must have a friendly attitude toward the trainer. Training a friendly hippocampus requires six weeks of work and the assistance of an animal trainer. Riding a hippocampus requires an exotic saddle. A hippocampus can fight while carrying a rider, but the rider cannot also attack unless he or she succeeds on rolling 1d20 under their dexterity score, with fighters subtracting their level from the roll.

Hippocampus eggs are worth 1,500 gp apiece on the open market, while young are worth 2,500 gp each. Professional trainers (usually tritons) charge 1,000 gp to rear or train a hippocampus.

A light load for a hippocampus is up to 300 pounds; a medium load, 301-600 pounds; and a heavy load, 601-900 pounds.

  • Hippocampus: HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk Bite (1d4) or tail slap (1d6) or butt (1d4); Move 0/2 (swimming); Save 13; AL L; CL/XP 4/120; Special: None

Source: Hippocampus from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Green and Erica Balsley, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Hippogriff

The hippogriff is similar to a griffon, having the head, foreclaws, and wings of an eagle, but instead of the body of a lion, it has the body of a horse. The poem Orlando Furioso (written by the poet Dante in 1516) suggests that the hippogriff is the offspring of a griffon and a horse—but they are apparently an independent breed, for folkloric tradition holds that griffons frequently attack hippogriffs. Hippogriffs are not as hard to train as griffons—again, from Orlando Furioso: “Drawn by enchantment from his distant lair, The wizard thought but how to tame the foal; And, in a month, instructed him to bear Saddle and bit, and gallop to the goal; And execute on earth or in mid air, All shifts of manege, course and caracole…”

  • Hippogriff: HD 3+1; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d6), 1 bite (1d10); Move 18 (Fly 24); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Hippopotamus

Hippopotami are very aggressive and territorial. A herd may be led by a large bull with 8HD, a saving throw of 8, and damage of 3d6 (CL/XP 8/800).

  • Hippopotamus: HD 7; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 6 (Swim 12); Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Hoar Fox

Hoar foxes are silvery-gray foxes with sapphire colored eyes. They hunt in packs and can often be found lairing near settled areas. Hoar foxes are often hunted for their fur as it brings a handsome sum on the open market. While attacking a hoar fox with fire seems like a sensible solution (given their vulnerability to it), such an attack destroys its pelt and renders it worthless. Three times per day, a hoar fox can expel a blast of frigid ice in a 30-foot cone. A creature in the area takes 2d6 points of cold damage (saving throw for half damage).

  • Hoar Fox: HD 2; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 15; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Breath weapon, immunity to cold, double damage from fire, surprise on roll of 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Hoar Fox from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green, based on original material by Graeme Morris.

Hoar Spirit

Hoar spirits are believed to be humanoids that freeze to death and are doomed to haunt the icy wastes. A hoar spirit appears much as it did in life, though its body is gaunt and rotting, and its clothes are tattered. Its skin is pale gray with ice crystals randomly located on its form. Its hands end in wicked claws with pale blue, nearly translucent nails. Its eyes are frozen solid and show no signs of life. Any strike with by the creature’s claws deals an extra 1d4 points of damage from the intense cold radiating off its body, and a victim must save or be paralyzed for 1d4+1 rounds. A hoar spirit can unleash a cone of cold once per day.

  • Hoar Spirit: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d4 + cold) or 1 weapon (1d8 + cold); Move 6; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: cone of cold (1/day), immune to cold, paralyze

Source: Hoar Spirit from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green.

Hobgoblin

Hobgoblins are simply large goblins, possibly a separate breed living apart from their smaller cousins, or perhaps not, as the Referee decides. As a matter of the campaign’s flavoring, the Referee might choose to make hobgoblins the “fey” goblins of Irish legend, while regular goblins are the more Tolkien-style underground-dwellers.

  • Hobgoblin: HD 1+1; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8); Move 9; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Homonculus

A homunculus is a living, man-like creature created by a powerful magic-user as a servant. The precise abilities of a homunculus depend upon the spells and procedures used in its creation (the details of creating a homunculus are left to the Referee), although virtually all are created with wings of some kind. The most common homunculus has a sleep-inducing bite (saving throw), but others might be created with a poison bite (CL 4/120XP), or might have unusual powers of perception instead (such as the ability to detect magic, evil, spells, etc).

  • Homunculus: HD 2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d3 + sleep); Move 6 (Fly 20); Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Sleep-inducing bite.

Source: Monstrosities

Hornet, Giant

Giant hornets are 9-foot- long insects with black bodies and white markings on their thorax and abdomen. Giant hornets attack by biting their foes, only relying on their stingers when threatened. During combat, they release a pheromone that agitates all other giant hornets in the area, making them more aggressive (+1 attack, damage).

  • Giant Hornet: HD 7; AC 4 [15]; Atk bite (1d3) or sting (1d4 + poison); Move 1/24 (flying); Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Poison, pheromone

Source: Giant Hornet from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Green.

Horsefly, Giant

Giant horseflies are 8-foot-long, black hairy flies. Their bodies are thick and their multifaceted eyes are black and dark gold. Their wings are translucent and their legs are long, bristly and jet black. Females have a slightly longer mouth tube than males. A giant horsefly that successfully bites an opponent latches on to drain the creature’s blood for 1d4 points of damage per round until dislodged.’

  • Giant Horsefly: HD 4; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 3/15 (flying); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Blood drain

Source: Giant Horsefly from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Horses

  • Horse, Riding: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d2); Move 18; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None
  • Horse, War: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d2), 2 hooves (1d3); Move 18; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Hound of Chronos

Hounds of Chronos, also known as Temporal Dogs, are canine creatures from the Plane of Time (or a time-related other dimension). They possess the innate ability to manipulate time in a limited manner. Temporal Dogs hunt in packs that usually consist of 2 to 8 hounds. A Hound of Chronos will always know where, temporally, the other members of his pack are. Hounds of Chronos possess the ability to move forward in time. Twice per day, a Hound of Chronos may “jump” forward in time. This allows the hound to disappear from the present and reappear 1d4 rounds later. The Hounds use this ability in conjunction with surprise to get the drop on their prey. When they re-materialise 1 to 4 rounds into the future, their prey has a chance of being surprised (60%).

Once per day, a Hound of Chronos may shift backward in time to when it was healthier, returning “immediately” with full hit points. (Author: Skathros)

  • Hounds of Chronos: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), Bite (1d6); Move 18; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Temporal jump, Temporal heal.

Source: Monstrosities

Hound of Ill Omen

The hound of ill omen (only one is thought to exist) is a legendary monster that appears when a living creature offends his/her deity. The hound appears as a shadowy, translucent wolf about 5 feet tall at the shoulder. Only the creature that offended his deity can see the hound, and only he is affected by the hound’s attack. The hound cannot be attacked or driven away by any known means.

The hound of ill omen unleashes a booming howl (audible only to its intended target) that curses the target. This curse causes the next 1d10 wounds the target takes to automatically deal double damage.

Until the target suffers the requisite number of wounds, no form of natural healing cures any damage the target takes. Likewise, any caster attempting to cast a healing spell on cursed target must succeed on a saving throw or the spell has no effect on the cursed creature.

The victim receives no save to avoid the howl’s effects and it cannot be removed by any means short of a god’s magic, but if remove curse is cast on the target within 10 minutes after the howl, the effects of the curse are halved (i.e., only 1d5 wounds automatically confirm as critical hits).

Source: Hound of Ill Omen from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Mike Roberts.

Huecuva

Huecuva are the undead spirits of good clerics who were unfaithful to their god and turned to the path of evil before death. As punishment for their transgression, their god condemned them to roam the earth as the one creature all good-aligned clerics despise — undead. Huecuva resemble robed, worm-ridden skeletons and are often mistaken for such creatures. Three times per day, a huecuva can disguise their appearance with an illusion that makes them appear to be a normal cleric.

A huecuva attacks relentlessly until either it or its opponent is dead. During combat, if a lawful cleric attempts to turn a huecuva and fails, the huecuva concentrates all attacks on that cleric, ignoring all other opponents until the cleric or the huecuva is dead.

People struck in combat by the huecuva’s claws must pass a saving throw or come down with a fever. The fever incubates for 1d3 days before its symptoms appear. Once the incubation period is over, the disease inflicts 1d3 points of constitution and dexterity damage each day until the diseased victim passes a saving throw at a -3 penalty.

  • Huecuva: HD 2; AC 2 [17]; Atk Claws (1d4+1 plus disease); Move 12; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Change self, disease, silver or +1 weapons to hit

Source: Huecuva from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene based on original material by Underworld Oracle.

Huggermugger

A huggermugger appears as a 3- to 4-foot-tall humanoid with short, cropped, black hair, hidden beneath a black hat, pulled low so as to hide its facial features. Its skin is pale and cold to the touch, regardless of the actual temperature in the surrounding area. A huggermugger’s normal attire, in addition to its hat, is a robe of black or dark gray. Huggermuggers do not speak, other than the incessant chattering and mumbling they seem to constantly indulge in. If three or more huggermuggers surround an opponent and begin chattering, it causes confusion in the creature (as per the spell).

  • Huggermugger: HD 2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 weapon (1d4); Move 6; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Confusion

Source: Huggermugger from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Humans

Humans are such a versatile race that any number of “monsters” and NPCs can be made from them. Berserker warriors, tribesmen, cavemen, princesses, evil high priests, captains of the guard, foot-soldiers, and tavern-keepers are all different human “monsters.” Don’t try to build your non-player characters according to the rules for player characters. Just make up their stats and abilities as you see fit.

  • Human (common): HD 1d6hp; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 12; Save 18; AL Any; CL/XP B/10; Special: None.

Bandit

Bandits are roving groups of thieves, sometimes organized into small armies led by more powerful bandit chiefs and captains with higher hit dice.

  • Human Bandit: HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.

Berserker

Berserkers are normal humans, but they fight with astounding ferocity. A bonus of +2 is added to their attack rolls. They do not wear armor heavier than leather armor.

  • Human Berserker: HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: +2 to hit in berserk state.

Sergeant-At-Arms

Human sergeants are normally found in command of 1d6+5 human soldiers. These are the leaders of city guard units and other small military groups.

  • Human Sergeant: HD 3; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 14; AL any; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Soldier

Human soldiers serve as city guardsmen, mercenaries, and men-at-arms. They are generally armed with leather armor and a mace, sword, or spear.

  • Human Soldier: HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 17; AL any; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Hydra

Hydrae are great lizard-like or snake-like creatures with multiple heads. Each head has one hit die of its own, and when an individual head takes that much damage, that head dies. The body has as many hit dice as the total of the heads, so it is a matter of good strategy for adventurers to focus either on killing heads (when all the heads are dead the body dies) or killing the creature by attacking the body (in which case the heads die, too). Hydrae that breathe fire or regenerate their heads are also known to exist.

  • Hydra (5 headed): HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 5 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: None.
  • Hydra (6 headed): HD 6; AC 5 [14]; Atk 6 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: None.
  • Hydra (7 headed): HD 7; AC 5 [14]; Atk 7 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: None.
  • Hydra (8 headed): HD 8; AC 5 [14]; Atk 8 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: None.
  • Hydra (9 headed): HD 9; AC 5 [14]; Atk 9 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: None.
  • Hydra (10 headed): HD 10; AC 5 [14]; Atk 10 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: None.
  • Hydra (11 headed): HD 11; AC 5 [14]; Atk 11 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 4; AL N; CL/XP 13/23000; Special: None.
  • Hydra (12 headed): HD 12; AC 5 [14]; Atk 12 heads (1d6); Move 9; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 14/2600; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Hyena

Hyenas are pack-hunters and scavengers, known for the eerie laughing sound they make. They are not normally much of a threat, although they may attack weak-looking foes if they have sufficient numbers.

  • Hyena: HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d3); Move 16; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Hyena, Giant

Giant hyenas stand 8ft tall at the shoulder, and are more aggressive than their normal cousins. They might serve as mounts for tribes of gnolls in prehistoric or sword & sorcery campaigns.

  • Giant Hyena: HD 5; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 18; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

I

Igniguana

Igniguanas are large lizards about six feet long, with reddish hide and glowing eyes. They may be of some sort of elemental origin, coupling attributes of fire and earth, for they crawl directly through solid rock without digging, leaving no tunnel behind to mark their passage. They breathe small but intense blasts of fire, in a cone extending 20ft to a width of 20ft. Anyone within the cone takes 2d6 hit points of damage (save for half). (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Igniguana: HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 6; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Breathes fire, tunnel.

Source: Monstrosities

Imp

Imps are demonic creatures sent or summoned into the material plane. They are about a foot tall, and have small but functional wings. An imp can polymorph itself into one or two animal forms: a crow, goat, rat, or dog being common. Imps regenerate 1 hit point per round, and can be hit only by silver or magical weapons (or by animals with 5+ hit dice). In some cases, they may be forced to serve as a familiar to a powerful and evil magic user.

  • Imp: HD 2; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 sting (1d4 + poison); Move 6 (Fly 16); Save 16; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Poison tail, polymorph, regenerate, immune to fire, hit only by magic weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Inaed

Inaed are invisible, intangible spirits that inhabit books, scrolls and any other object upon which words are written. They possess no ability to attack directly; however, they can cast each of the following spells twice daily: sleep, phantasmal force, and suggestion. Inaed inhabiting a book or other object are entirely impervious to physical attacks, for an attack directed at the Inaed only damages the “home.” If its host book is completely destroyed, the Inaed will flee in search of a new book to haunt – including spell books. Though they are not undead, Inaed may be cast out of the books they haunt with a successful turning attempt. Treat Inaed as though they were Ghouls for this purpose. Books that have been freed of any Inaed, and books that have been blessed by a Cleric of 9th level or higher, are immune to infestation. “Turned” or otherwise unbound Inaed immediately seek out the nearest book to inhabit. Entering a book takes 2d4 turns, and it is during this time that Inaed are most vulnerable. The creatures are visible during this time — appearing as ghostly apparitions of adolescent human females — and can be physically damaged, although only by magical weapons. (Author: Andrew Trent)

  • Inaed: HD 3; AC 0 [19]; Atk none; Move 0 (Fly 18); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Invisible, Spells, Immune to all weapons or to normal weapons (depending on state)

Source: Monstrosities

Inner Child

A parasitic organism that lies dormant inside a human host, an inner child can dimensionally shift itself outside of the host’s body and return once per day. While outside it can levitate, but remains connected by a 6ft long psychic cord and cannot move further from the host than this. It resembles a smaller version of the host creature, but with a large head, feral features, and an almost vestigial body. The host creature is usually aware that it has an inner child, but (for obvious reasons) usually keeps it a dark secret.

An inner child has strong psionic abilities. It can read minds at will (per the ESP spell), “cast” charm person twice per day, cause a psychic blast at will (2d6 points of damage to all within a cone 60ft long and 60ft wide at the end, saving throw for half damage), and create a wall of mental force once per day (3ft thick, 50ft long and 50ft tall). If the host creature is killed, the inner child dies within 1d6 turns. (Author: Chad Thorson)

  • Inner child: HD 3; AC 3 [16]; Atk psychic blast (2d6); Move 8; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: ESP and psychic blast at will, charm person (2/day), and wall of mental force (1/day).

Source: Monstrosities

Inphidian

Somewhere in humanities lost aeons a race of malformed serpentine humanoids rose, now known as inphidians.

While the truth of their origins has been long forgotten, most sages subscribe to one of two theories. The first states the creatures are the failed results of horrific experiments performed by the dark and nameless sorcerers of an ancient snake-cult in their attempts to ensorcel their followers. The second theory contends the inphidians were once a cult of snake-worshippers cursed by an ancient snake-god for some transgression against the ethos. Whatever the truth, it appears as of late that the inphidians have evolved into true race, beyond the machinations of arcane experiments or curses. While there exist several known species, recent reports describe encounters with yet unidentified inphidians and others are sure to surface as encounters with the race grow more frequent.

Inphidians, regardless of their subspecies, have viper heads in place of their hands. The creatures use these in combat to deliver a powerful bite that injects the victim with poison. Some inphidians, particularly the craftsmen, wear special gloves called inphidian gauntlets that let them use their hands like any other humanoid with five digits.

Cobra-Back Inphidian

Cobra-backs appear as roughly humanoid creatures just over 6 feet tall with a large flap of skin (known as the hood) that runs the length of their neck/spine. Cobra-backs are blue-green scaled like other inphidians, their eyes are crimson, and their forked tongue is gray. Like their brethren, their hands are actually viper heads complete with sharpened fangs that secrete a virulent poison (3d4 points of damage, save for half). When threatened or enraged, the hood of the cobra-back fans open just like that of a true cobra. A cobra-back can spit a line of poison 20 feet from its mouth every 1d4 rounds (2d6 points of damage, save for half).

  • Cobra-Back Inphidian: HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 snake hand bites (1d4 + poison); Move 9; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Poison, spit poison

Source: Cobra-Back Inphidian from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Common Inphidian

A common inphidian appears as a humanoid standing about 6 feet tall. Its skin is covered with blue-green scales and its head is almost snake-like in appearance. It has no hair on its head or body. The most unusual feature of an inphidian is its hands; for where they should be, they are not. Each hand has been replaced with the head of a viper with scales of the same blue-green color as the other parts of the inphidian. Common inphidians make up the bulk of the population in inphidian communities. They are the laborers, craftsmen, workers, citizens, guards, and militia.

Once every 1d4 rounds, a common inphidian can spew forth a line of milky-white liquid that causes blindness (as the blindness spell) for 6 rounds to any creature struck. A successful saving throw avoids the spray. The spray has a range of 20 feet. The snake hands of the common inphidian deliver a debilitating poison with a successful bite from its snake-hands. The poison weakens the bitten victim, imposing a -2 penalty to hit and damage in melee combat.

  • Common Inphidian: HD 4; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 snake hand bites (1d4 + poison); Move 12; Save 13 AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Poison, spit poison

Source: Common Inphidian from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Dancer Inphidian

Most dancer/charmer inphidians appear as shapely female humanoids; lithe and elegant in their movements. A charmer’s forked tongue is gray and their eyes are crimson. Like other inphidians their body is covered in blue-green scales and where their hands should be, a viper head sprouts from each of its arms. Each viper head is of the same blue-green color and scaled like the rest of the charmer’s body. The snake head hands strike with a weak poison (1d4 points of damage), so the inphidian usually relies on its entrancing dance to charm those seeing it (as per a charm person spell).

  • Dancer Inphidian: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 snake hand bites (1d4 + poison); Move 9; Save 14 AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Poison, entrancing dance

Source: Dancer Inphidian from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Night Adder Inphidian

Usually dressed in black robes, an inphidian night adder has black scales covering its entire body. Its head is serpentine and its arms end in snake-like hands resembling a black mamba. A night adder stands 6-1/2 feet tall and weighs 190 pounds. The snake hands of a night adder deliver a deadly poison. About 40% of night adder inphidians can cast spells as a 7th-level Cleric.

  • Night Adder Inphidian: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 snake hand bites (1d6 + poison); Move 9; Save 11 AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Poison, spells

Source: Night Adder Inphidian from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Rattler Inphidian

A rattler inphidian is 6 feet tall and about 8 feet long, with a viper head and the lower torso of a giant rattlesnake. Colors vary, but most are brown, black, or dark gray with bands and diamond-shaped patterns. Like all inphidians, its hands are viper heads. Once every 1d4 rounds, a rattler inphidian can unleash a death rattle that does 2d6 points of damage to all creatures in a 40-foot-radius (save for half). The snake hand bite of a rattler inphidian delivers a paralytic poison (2d8 points of damage, paralysis, save resists).

  • Rattler Inphidian: HD 6; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 snake hand bites (1d6 + poison); Move 9/6/6 (climbing/swimming); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Death rattle, paralytic poison

Source: Rattler Inphidian from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Invisible Stalker

Invisible stalkers are generally found only as a result of the spell Invisible Stalker. They are invisible flying beings created to follow a single command made by the caster.

  • Invisible Stalker: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 “bite” (4d4); Move 0 (Fly 12); Save 8; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Invisible.

Source: Monstrosities

Iounifier

The IOUNifier is a small, intricate tangle of wires and filaments with infinitesimal motes of light dancing unpredictably within; they are no more than one inch in diameter. Their small size, coupled with the fact that they move very quickly, makes them difficult to hit with weapons. An IOUNifier projects a beam of bluish light; if any person is caught within the light, the shadow projected by the beam is a solid, material shape that manifests within one round. Once a person is caught within the light beam (requiring a successful to-hit roll by the IOUNifier), the IOUNifier can hold the person in the beam without further effort unless a wall or other very significant obstacle completely obstructs the beam. The projected “shadow” of the target is shaped exactly like the person being projected – it is constructed of wires that look like blood vessels running through and around whirring clockwork internal organs, and with a face-mask of bronze that resembles the face of the target in perfect detail. The shadow wears armor and carries equipment identical to the target’s, but these do not duplicate any magical effects of the originals.

The shadow has the same number of hit points as the living creature from which it is projected, and regenerates 3hp per round until it is killed. It will attack its original relentlessly until it is killed, whereupon it simply disappears. If the victim is killed by its projection, the projection will instantly fall upon the corpse, envelope it in its wires and filaments, and compress itself and the corpse into an IOUN stone. The IOUN stone will respond to the first person who picks it up, orbiting around that person’s head, and granting a bonus to an attribute score for as long as it continues to circle. The attribute affected depends upon the person who is compacted into the stone; if that person was a cleric, the IOUN stone adds +1 to wisdom; if the victim was a magic-user, the stone adds +1 to intelligence; otherwise, the stone adds +1 to strength.

These IOUN stones are not permanent, lasting only 1d4+1 days; some other, lost, procedure seems to be needed to make the stones last longer than this. The IOUNifier can only maintain two projections at any given time, and cannot make a second projection of the same person more than once per day. Note: attempts to use IOUNifiers for personal gain, especially by nefarious means, are quite dangerous – whatever programming drives the IOUNifier seems driven to cause ironic and dangerous consequences to those who try to manipulate them. The challenge level of an IOUNifier varies with its targets, and thus can’t be calculated ahead of time. The XP value of an IOUNifier should be approximately the same as a monster with the same hit dice as the party has levels. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Iounifier: HD 3; AC 0 [19]; Atk none – by projection only; Move 0 (Fly 25); Save 5; AL N; CL/XP varies; Special: Improved saving throw, immune to electricity, projection beam.

Source: Monstrosities

Iron Cobra

The iron cobra is a construct that resembles a small, 3-foot long cobra. Its eyes give it an evil, determined and almost intelligent look. The iron cobra is most often used to guard a treasure or to act as a bodyguard to its creator, though on some occasions it can be ordered to track down and slay any creature who is within 1 mile and whose name is known by the creator.

When ordered to find a creature within 1 mile, an iron cobra does so unerringly, as though guided by magic. The being giving the order must have seen (or must have an item belonging to) the creature to be found.

The bite of an iron cobra is poisonous, but being a construct, it does not produce its poison. The creator must fill the iron cobra’s poison sacs. The sacs can be filled with any poison type of poison, but the poison is usually fatal. The iron cobra can inject its poison three times before its sacs are emptied. It takes 5 rounds to refill the poison sacs.

Iron Cobra Construction

An iron cobra’s body is constructed from 100 pounds of iron costing at least 1,000 gp. Assembling the body requires the help of an armorer and a 10th level cleric.

  • Iron Cobra: HD 1+1; AC 1 [18]; Atk Bite (1d4 + poison); Move 15; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Find target, poison, magic resistance 10%

Source: Iron Cobra from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Philip Masters.

J

Jack-In-The-Box

At first glance, this critter appears as a brightly decorated box with a rotating handle at its side. With surprising quickness, a jester-like creature (mounted on a spring, of course!) springs from the box attacking and maiming. If concealed within its “box”, a Jack-in-the-Box has a 50% chance of surprising its foes. This chance increases to 70% if the Jack-in-the-Box is released from the box via the rotating handle. When enclosed within its box, the Jack-in-the-Box AC becomes 3[16].

A Jack-in-the-Box may only move by hopping, carrying its cubic abode with him. (Author: Skathros)

  • Jack-in-the-Box: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk Dagger or other small bladed weapon (1d4); Move 6; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Surprise.

Source: Monstrosities

Jack-O-Lantern

A jack-o-lantern is an animated plant creature brought to life by a combination of druidic magic and fey sprits. It looks like a roughly humanoid shaped tangle of vines and leaves with a large pumpkin for its head. The pumpkin-head bears a leering face that appears to have been carved there, and glows from within with an eldritch fire. The nature of the face generally reflects the alignment of the animating spirit. Once per day, the monster can spit from its mouth up to four exploding pumpkin seeds. It can spit the seeds up to 100 feet and deals a total of 8d8 points of damage divided up between the seeds. The seeds explode in a 10 foot radius and those in the area may attempt a saving throw to halve the damage.

  • Jack-O-Lantern: HD 6; AC 5 [14]; Atk 3 strikes (1d4) or fire seed (see below) or pitchfork (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Fire Seeds

Source: Jack-O-Lantern from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Jackal

Small, dog-like scavengers, jackals present no significant threat to a well-armed party of humans.

  • Jackal: HD 1d4hp; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 bite (1d2); Move 14; Save 18; AL N; CL/XP A/15; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Jackal of Darkness

These creatures resemble jackals with black fur, limned with a dark fire that sheds no light and burns black when the jackal emerges from the darkness. They haunt long-abandoned tombs, possibly being shackled to them as guardians by ancient magics – the relation of the jackals to their tomb-lairs is not known. They seem to be undead, in that they can be turned (as mummies), but do not appear to rot, nor do they seem to be incorporeal in any way. The black fire around the jackal acts almost like an independent creature; when the jackal is in combat, the black fire streams forth and can envelop one opponent (within 50ft of the jackal), causing 1 hit point of damage per round. The jackal can move the black fire where it wishes. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Jackal of Darkness: HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 14; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Black fire.

Source: Monstrosities

Jackalwere

A jackalwere is an evil spirit with the body of a jackal, but it can also assume a human form. Jackalweres can cause sleep by looking deeply into a human’s eyes for a few moments (saving throw). Jackalweres can only be damaged with silver or magical weapons.

  • Jackalwere: HD 4; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (2d4); Move 12; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Sleep gaze, hit by silver or magic weapons only.

Source: Monstrosities

Jaculi

Jaculi are serpents with long, muscular bodies and a squat, flat heads. A mane-like ridge of sharpened bones surrounds its head. Jaculi average 8 feet long, but can grow to a length of 12 feet. Their natural coloration is a deep green fading to a dark brown near the tail and light gray on their underbellies.. Jaculi lie in wait for opponents, preferring places high above the ground where they can leap on their prey and gain surprise.

  • Jaculi: HD 1; AC 4 [15]; Atk Bite (1d6); Move 12; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Surprise on roll of 1-5 on 1d6

Source: Jaculi from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Philip Masters.

Janni

Jann are genies not tied to any particular element, unlike the efreet and the djinn. Like other genies, they have magical powers: enlarge or shrink themselves, invisibility (5/day), and dimension door (1/day). Jann can travel into the elemental planes, even bringing others with them, but they cannot remain more than an hour and a day in another plane of existence, or they will perish.

  • Janni: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8+4); Move 12 (Fly 24); Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Genie powers.

Source: Monstrosities

Jelly, Marsh

A marsh jelly looks like a hovering, flying jellyfish with a translucent sickly green body and four long dangling grayish-pink tentacles. When slain, a marsh jelly explodes in a blast of acid that deals 2d4 points of acid damage to anything within 10 feet. A successful save reduces the damage by half. When a marsh jelly first takes damage, its body begins pulsating and flashing rapidly, emitting an eerie greenish glow. Creatures viewing a pulsating marsh jelly are disoriented (–1 to-hit penalty) for 1d4 rounds. Opponents hit by a marsh jelly’s poison tentacles must make a saving throw or be paralyzed for 1d4 round.

  • Jelly, Marsh: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 4 tentacle (1d6 + poison); Move 4/18 (flying); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Death throws, disorienting glow, poison

Source: Jelly, Marsh from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Jelly, Marsh (Demonic, Progeny of Jubilex)

A demonic marsh jelly looks like a larger, more sinister marsh jelly. These intelligent minions carry out the will of their slime lord. When slain, a demonic marsh jelly explodes in a blast of acid that deals 3d6 points of acid damage to anything within 10 feet. A successful save reduces the damage by half. When a demonic marsh jelly first takes damage, its body pulsates and flashes rapidly, emitting an eerie greenish glow. Creatures viewing this pulsating glow are disoriented (–2 on attack rolls) for 2d4 rounds. Opponents hit by a demonic marsh jelly’s poison tentacles must save or be paralyzed for 1d4 round.

  • Jelly, Marsh: HD 15; AC 3 [16]; Atk 4 tentacle (1d8 + acid plus poison); Move 4/18 (flying); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: 20% spell resistance, immune to poison and acid, death throws, disorienting glow, telepathy 120 ft., poison

Source: Jelly, Marsh (Demonic, Progeny of Jubilex) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Jelly, Mustard

Mustard jelly appears to be a yellowish-brown form of the ochre jelly and is thought to be a distant relative of said creature. However, the mustard jelly is far more dangerous than its supposed relative because it is intelligent. The mustard jelly gives off a faint odor of mustard plants to a range of 20 feet. The mustard jelly exudes an aura in a 10-foot radius centered on it that slows (as the slow spell) any creature in the area as long as it remains in the area and for 1d4 rounds afterward. A new save must be made each round a creature is within 10 feet of the mustard jelly.

A mustard jelly attacks by forming a pseudopod from its body and either slashing or enveloping its foes. A creature hit by a pseudopod must pass a saving throw or be constricted for automatic pseudopod damage each round.

A mustard jelly can split itself into two identical jellies, each with half of the original’s current hit points (round down). A jelly with 10 hit points or less cannot divide itself. When divided, each jelly moves faster than the original (base speed 15 feet per round).

A mustard jelly is immune to electrical effects and magic missiles. If targeted by an electricity effect (including area effects) or a magic missile spell, the mustard jelly gains temporary hit points equal to the amount of damage it would have otherwise sustained. These temporary hit points last for 1 hour.

  • Jelly, Mustard: HD 7; AC 2 [17]; Atk Slam (2d4 plus 1d4 acid); Move 12; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 12/1200; Special: Acid, constriction, poison aura, +1 or better weapon to hit, divide, energy absorption, resistance to cold (50%), magic resistance (15%)

Source: Jelly, Mustard from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Jelly, Stun

Stunjellies are distant relatives of the dungeon-dwelling gelatinous cube. It appears as a section of ordinary wall and covers an area of at least 10 square feet. A stunjelly is 2-1/2 to 5 feet thick. A stunjelly is gray in color and slightly translucent. It gives off a mild vinegar odor that can be detected at a range of 5 feet.

When a target moves within 5 feet of a stunjelly, it attacks with its slam attack. A stunjelly’s acid does not harm metal or stone. Creatures hit by a stunjelly must pass a saving throw or be paralyzed for 3d6 rounds. Stunjellies automatically engulf paralyzed creatures, who then suffer automatic acid damage and paralysis each round. Attacks that hit an engulfing stunjelly deal half their damage to the monster and half to the trapped victim.

Stunjellies only surprise dwarves on a roll of 1-2 on 1d6.

  • Jelly, Stun-: HD 4; AC 5 [14]; Atk Slam (1d6 plus 1d6 acid plus paralysis); Move 6; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Acid, engulf, paralysis, camouflage, immunity to electricity, surprise on a roll of 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Jelly, Stun- from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Neville White.

Jelly, Whip

A whip jelly looks like a bluish-gray quivering pile of goo with four long slimy tendrils jutting from its form. A whip jelly, like most oozes, is a mindless hunter that spends its time prowling the subterranean world for food. A whip jelly secretes a deadly acid that quickly dissolves organic matter but does not harm metal or stone. Any melee hit deals acid damage. Non-metal armor or clothing dissolves and becomes useless immediately unless.

  • Jelly, Whip: HD 3; AC 8 [11]; Atk 4 whip tendrils (1d4 + 1d4 acid); Move 8; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Acid

Source: Jelly, Whip from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Jellyfish, Hypnotic

The colors of a hypnotic jellyfish are so soothing that anyone viewing this undersea predator must make a saving throw or fall into a dreamlike trance for 1d6 turns. The jellyfish is very large, about the size of a man. Its sting carries a lethal poison.

  • Hypnotic Jellyfish: HD 3; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 sting (1d8 + poison); Move 0 (Swim 3); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Hypnotic colors.

Source: Monstrosities

Jellyfish, Monstrous

The monstrous jellyfish’s body is a translucent pink, blue, or purple hollow form resembling an inverted umbrella of sorts. A giant jellyfish’s body averages 8 feet or more in diameter, while its tentacles (trailing beneath it underwater) can reach lengths of around 50 feet or greater. Special muscles on the underside of the jellyfish’s body push water out of it, allowing the creature to swim through propulsion. Jellyfish eat anything that contacts their tentacles — usually crustaceans, fish, algae, plankton and the occaissional water breathing adventurer.

A monstrous jellyfish’s tentacles are highly poisonous, delivering a paralyzing poison when contacted or contacting a foe. The victim of the poison suffers 1d4 points of stinging damage and must pass a saving throw or be paralyzed for 1d6 rounds.

  • Jellyfish, Monstrous: HD 3; AC 7 [12]; Atk Tentacles (1d6 plus poison); Move 0/6 (swimming); Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Poison, transparent (surprise on roll of 1-2 on 1d6)

Source: Jellyfish, Monstrous from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Jupitor Bloodsucker (Vampire Plant)

The jupiter bloodsucker, or vampire plant, is a man-sized, seemingly ordinary plant that looks like a tangle of leaves and roots topped by four large, dark green, serrated leaves with red veins. A creature looking closely at the roots may notice that the stems are transparent and that blood seems to course through them. On the bottom of each leaf are many small, sharp thorns. These are used to attach to a victim and drain its blood.

A jupiter bloodsucker deals 1 point of constitution damage per round per vine-leaf attached to a foe. If reduced to zero points of constitution, the victim has been completely drained of blood and dies. Constitution points lost to a jupiter bloodsucker heal at the rate of 1 per hour. Prying a leaf loose requires a successful open doors check.

A victim struck by more than one vine-leaf in a round must make a saving throw to avoid being smothered by them. For every vine-leaf beyond the first, the victim suffers a -1 penalty to its saving throw. An opponent so smothered must hold his breath or die. Again, one can pry leaves loose by making a successful open doors check.

  • Juputor Bloodsucker (Vampire Plant): HD 3; AC 4 [15]; Atk 6 vine-leaves (1d6 plus blood drain); Move 3; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Blood drain, smother, double damage from fire

Source: Jupiter Bloodsucker (Vampire Plant) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Jean Wells.