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Monster Details K through N




Monster Details K through N

Contents


Kamadan

The kamadan is a feline-like predator that may somehow be related to the displacer beast. The kamadan has coarse, yellowish brown fur and a leopard-like body and head with emerald green eyes. From its shoulders sprout six long serpents, blackish-green in color, each about twice the length of a normal human. The serpents’ eyes are reddish-yellow. It is about 9 feet long and weighs about 600 pounds. 

The kamadan is a fierce predator and highly territorial, hunting just about anything that spends too much time in its territory. The kamadan has a hunting range of about 5 or more square miles. It makes its lair under rocky outcroppings or within caves.

Kamadans are intelligent creatures and are capable of speaking the local common tongue with a thick accent, owing to their felinoid mouths.

Once every 1d4 rounds and no more than 5 times per day, a kamadan can exhale a cone of sleep 30 feet long and 20 feet wide at the base. Creatures with 4 HD or less are automatically cast into a deep slumber; creatures with 5 HD or more are permitted a saving throw to avoid drowsing.

Poisonous Kamadan

A variant kamadan, one with poisonous snakes, is rumored to exist. Encounters with such creatures are rare, for which most adventurers are thankful. The poisonous kamadan uses the same statistics as the normal kamadan, but each snake head delivers a deadly poisonous bite. The poisonous kamadan has a CL/XP of 7/600.

  • Kamadan: HD 4; AC 3 [16]Atk 2 claws (1d6) or snakes (1d4) and bite (1d8)Move 15; 
    Save 13; AL N (Chaotic tendencies); CL/XP 6/400; SpecialSleep breath

Source: Kamadan from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Nick Louth.

Kamarupa

A kamarupa appears as a mockery of its former flesh-bound life. Its hollow eyes and mouth are black voids, and its facial features twist and stretch into a nightmarish appearance. Kamarupa are the distorted souls of evil priests betrayed and sacrificed to their deity. Kamarupas are highly intelligent and communicate in voices similar to the screaming wind. They hate life and light. A kamarupa is roughly human-sized and weightless. They are made powerless in sunlight, and can be destroyed if caught in natural daylight.

A creature touched by a kamarupa feels the unnatural aura of the creature as it penetrates to his very soul. The chill can kill the PC unless a successful saving throw is made. The kamarupa’s gaze can also instill fear in living beings up to 30 ft. Beings meeting the creature’s gaze must make a save or become panicked for 3d4 rounds and try to flee blindly from the creature.

Once per night, a kamarupa can place a nightmare on any creature it has encountered. The target can resist the nightmare with a successful saving throw (at a -4 penalty). Any creature that succumbs to the incredibly vivid dreams suffers 1d10 points of damage.

  • Keeper of The Well: HD 10; AC 3 [16]; Atk incorporeal touch (2d6 plus death touch); Move Fly 15; Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Death touch, frightful gaze, nightmare.

Source: Splinters of Faith 10

Kampfult (Sinewy Mugger)

This creature is a man-sized monster resembling a tree trunk with six long sinewy tendrils spaced evenly around the upper portion of its body. Six smaller tendrils located at the base of its trunk seem to aid it in locomotion. Its body is dark grayish-green and its tendrils are dark gray changing to dark green at the tips. The kampfult haunts subterranean realms in search of prey, grabbing any living creature that passes by. Creatures slain by a kampfult are slowly absorbed into the base of the trunk and digested. Kampfults do not speak, but it is thought that they can understand the language of the drow.

A kampfult attacks from surprise, waiting until its prey moves within reach and then lashing out with its tendrils, attempting to grab and entangle its prey. A kampfult rarely attacks creatures larger than itself unless it is extremely hungry. It fights until either it or its opponent is dead. Those struck by a tendril must pass a saving throw to avoid it wrapping around their neck and inflicting 1d4 points of damage automatically each round. Tendrils can be removed with a successful open doors check or severed with an edged weapon. The tendrils have an AC of 3 [16] and are severed with 4 points of damage.

  • Kampfult (Sinewy Mugger): HD 2; AC 3 [16]Atk 6 tendrils (1d4); Move 6; Save 16; 
    AL N (Chaotic tendencies); CL/XP 2/30; Special: Strangle

Source: Kampfult (Sinewy Mugger) from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Kathlin

A kathlin resembles a heavy warhorse with six legs. Black or brown coats are the horse’s most common coloring, although white-coated kathlins are sometimes found. Eye color varies as much as fur color, but again brown or black seems to be most common. Kathlins can be trained to serve as mounts, and their ability to run for days without rest makes them highly prized.

  • Kathlin: HD 4; AC 7 [12]Atk 2 hooves (1d6), bite (1d4); Move 24; Save 13; AL N; 
    CL/XP 4/120; Special: Endurance

Source: Kathlin from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Kech

Kechs are monkey-like humanoids standing about 6 feet tall and weighing about 150 pounds. They have azure eyes and their bodies are covered in leathery scales that resemble greenish-brown leaves. Kech make their homes in trees and prefer to move through the trees rather than on the ground. They have an almost human organization and society among the various tribes and clans. Family units dwell in a single lair (usually a hollowed tree or small hut built among the branches of a leafy tree). Kechs speak their own language and have a 15% chance of speaking the common tongue.

Kechs attack from ambush, preferring to ensnare their prey in pits, traps, or the like. If faced with a weak adversary, they attack with a frontal assault, seeking to kill as quickly as possible. Slain prey is dragged into the kech’s lair and devoured at the creatures’ leisure. If a kech hits with both claw attacks, it latches onto the opponent’s body and tears the flesh for an extra 2d4 points of damage. 

A kech can move across any ground— ice, snow, mud—without leaving any footprints. Tracking a kech by nonmagical means is impossible.

  • Kech: HD 5; AC 3 [16]Atk 2 claws (1d4) and bite (1d6)Move 12; Save 12; AL C; 
    CL/XP 5/240; SpecialRending claws, pass without trace, surprise on roll of 1-3 on 1d6

Source: Kech from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Keeper Of The Well

Keepers Of The Well are semi-intelligent water spirits that enter the material world at the behest of a powerful cleric. These spirits willingly enter into a contract with the spiritual leader who brought them forth, agreeing to be bound to a particular well or spring and defend it from all creatures not part of the local village or temple. In return for its service, the Keeper of the Well is freed from the slave-like existence it would normally have on its home place or in the spirit world. A village’s Keeper of the Well is often worshipped as a minor deity. A Keeper of the Well appears as a large, snake-like column of water rising out of the opening of the well that it defends. They cannot leave the well, though they can manifest themselves from any opening tied to the local water system, instantly appearing at the desired location. Keepers of the Well are immune to fire and possess magic resistance of 75%. Spells that specifically affect water (such as Part Water) can be used to damage or affect a Keeper of the Well with results that may vary from the spell’s normal operation. (Author: Andrew Trent)

  • Keeper of The Well: HD 9; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 “fist” (2d8); Move 0 (see text for special); Save 6; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Fire immunity, Magic resistance (75%), Water teleport.

Source: Monstrosities

Kelp Devil

Kelp devils are relatives of kelpies. To the casual observer, the kelp devil resembles a large colony of slow moving seaweed about 20 feet in diameter. A closer look reveals six 10-foot long pseudopods extending from its body. Kelp devils speak the common tongue.

Kelp devils are patient creatures. They lie perfectly motionless until potential prey moves within 10 feet. Once their prey is within range, they strike quickly with their pseudopods, attempting to grab an opponent. Grappled creatures are dragged underwater and drowned. Slain creatures are devoured by the kelp devil.

Twice per day, on a successful hit with a frond, a kelp devil can affect the opponent as by charm monster. The creature can make a saving throw to resist the effects.

Creatures hit by a kelp devil’s fronds must make a saving throw or be entwined and dragged under water to drown. Kelp devils are expert at squeezing the air from a creature’s lungs, so their victims can only hold their breath for 1 round per 2 points of constitution before they drown.

  • Kelp Devil: HD 8; AC 2 [17]Atk 6 fronds (1d6)Move 12/18 (swimming); Save 8; AL C; 
    CL/XP 10/1400; SpecialCharm, immunity to electricity, resistance to fire (50%), resistance to blunt weapons (50%), underwater concealment

Source: Kelp Devil from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Bruce Cordell.

Kelpie

In their true form, kelpies are indistinguishable from normal seaweed. They are found in saltwater and freshwater, swamps, fens, and stagnated underground pools and lakes. In her human guise, a kelpie appears as a beautiful female with long flowing dark hair, emerald eyes, and soft, pale skin. She is cloaked in robes of seaweed or wears nothing at all. A kelpie often assumes a semi-human form in which her lower torso is composed entirely of seaweed. Kelpies speak the common tongue and possibly the language of merfolk and tritons.

Kelpies lie in wait for their foes, most often males, and when a target moves within range, they reshape their form to appear human. In most cases, they take the form of a drowning woman to lure the target closer. If the ruse is not detected and the opponent moves within reach of the kelpie, she attacks, attempting to drown her victim. Drowned foes are taken back to the kelpie’s lair and devoured.

Once per day, a kelpie can produce an effect identical to the charm monster spell. The target can make a saving throw to avoid the effects. If the save fails, the victim believes the kelpie to be a very beautiful and attractive creature, and attempts to move as quickly as possible toward the kelpie. The kelpie can automatically grapple a charmed foe, for they do not resist the kelpie’s embrace. A charmed foe can only hold his breath for a number of rounds equal to his Constitution. After that, he drowns.

Female creatures are immune to the kelpie’s charm ability; only males can be affected. The charm is negated if the victim dies, the kelpie dies, or dispel magic is cast on the victim.

Kelpies can survive out of the water for 6 hours.

  • Kelpie: HD 5; AC 2 [17]Atk Slam (see below)Move 9/12 (swimming); Save 12; AL C; 
    CL/XP 7/600; SpecialCharm, amphibious, reshape form, resistance to fire (50%), telepathy 1 mile

Source: Kelpie from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Lawrence Schick.

Khargra

Khargra resembles a human-sized cylinder covered in metallic scales. It sports three large “fins” spaced even around its circumference. Between each fin is a metal sheath from which slide long claw-like arms. A large hole in the front of its cylindrical body is lined with many small curved metallic teeth and seems to function as its mouth. A khargra is a 5-foot long cylinder and weighs about 300 pounds.

Khargras are native to the Elemental Plane of Earth and are only encountered on the Material Plane when summoned. On occasion, a khargra slips through a tear in the planar fabric and enters the Material Plane to digest ores and metals not normally found on its native plane. 

Khargras attack from ambush, preferring to wait just inside the wall of a dungeon or corridor and springing out when prey passes nearby. The khargra attempts to grab and devour any metal objects within the area. Nonmetallic objects may be bitten, but not devoured.

A khargra’s bite can tear right through armor and weapons. Khargra can bite weapons by making a successful melee attack at a -5 penalty. If a khargra misses an attack due to armor or a shield, their attack instead affects the armor. In either event, the owner of the object must roll a saving throw, rolling 1d20 and adding either the armor bonus or weapon’s damage dice and equalling or exceeding a roll of 15. If unsuccessful, the obect is ruined.

A khargra can glide through stone, dirt, or almost any other sort of earth, including metal, as easily as a fish swims through water. Its burrowing leaves behind no tunnel or hole, nor does it create any ripple or other signs of its presence. A move earth spell cast on an area containing a burrowing khargra flings the khargra back 30 feet, stunning the creature for 1 round unless it succeeds at a saving throw. Khargra can automatically sense the location of anything within 60 feet that is in contact with the ground.

  • Khargra: HD 6; AC 0 [19]Atk 3 claws (1d3) and bite (2d8)Move 6/12 (burrowing); Save 11; 
    AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; SpecialRuin armor and weapons, earth glide, immunity to cold and fire

Source: Khargra from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Lawrence Schick.

Kheph

The Kheph are jackal-headed humanoids with a sleek black covering of body fur. Below the neck, the form of a Kheph’s body is very much like that of a muscular and well-proportioned human being, although they are larger (averaging 7 feet tall). The Kheph are an ancient species, older than mankind, and they revere evil gods forgotten or never known by most living races. Their supernatural link to planes of existence beyond material reality is very strong, and Kheph leaders are said to be able to shift between planes of existence with ease.

Warrior kheph have 8HD but no magical abilities. They usually fight with scimitars, attacking twice per round, but may (20%) be armed with bows or (20%) with polearms. Kheph priests cast spells as a cleric of 9th level, and in addition can (as an innate ability) cast symbol of pain and plane shift once per day. Kheph Magi cast spells as a magic user of 10th level, and in addition can (as an innate ability) cast symbol of fear and plane shift once per day. Kheph elders have the spell casting abilities of an 11th level cleric and magic user, and in addition can (as an innate ability) cast symbol of death and plane shift once per day. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Kheph Warrior: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 scimitars (1d8); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: +2 to hit.
  • Kheph Priest: HD 9; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 scimitar (1d8); Move 12; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Spells as level 9 cleric, symbol of pain, plane shift.
  • Kheph Mage: HD 10; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 scimitar (1d8); Move 12; Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Spells as level 10 magic-user, symbol of fear, plane shift.
  • Kheph Elder: HD 11; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 scimitar (1d8); Move 12; Save 4; AL C; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Spells as level 11 magic-user and level 11 cleric, symbol of death, plane shift.

Source: Monstrosities

Khryll

Khrylls are bizarre subterranean creatures, possessed of a malevolently genius-level intellect. They have curving, jointed shells like that of a crayfish or lobster, but without claws; rather than legs, the creature has squid-like tentacles emerging from each segment of the armored body. The tentacles of a Khryll permit some kind of limited levitation; a khryll can float and maneuver in the air provided that at least two of its tentacles are in contact with the ground or a wall. They cannot rise higher than the length of the 10ft tentacles.

The origin of these creatures in the deep underworld is unknown, but they are rapacious harvesters of most other intelligent species, even to the extent of breeding slaves to serve as food. They communicate telepathically, and their primary attack is to produce a mental shockwave that necessitates a saving throw by anyone caught in the area of the cone-shaped psychic ripple. The effect of the blast depends upon how many creatures are caught within:

1-2 creatures in area: Natural 1 on saving throw = death, Failed save = stunned 3d6 turns, Successful save = panic for 1d10 rounds.
3-4 creatures in area: Natural 1 on saving throw = stunned 3d6 turns, Failed save = panic for 3d6 turns, Successful save = confused for 1d10 rounds.
5+ creatures in area: Natural 1 on saving throw = panicked for 3d6 turns, Failed save = confused for 1d6 turns,Successful save = confused for 1d6 rounds.

In melee combat (or at leisure if all its foes are incapacitated), Khryll hold prey with their tentacles and insert a mouth-tube into the victim to begin liquefying the internal organs. If an opponent is hit by any two of the khryll’s tentacles, the khryll has an opportunity to jab its tube-like tongue down the victim’s throat into the body cavity, and begin liquefying organs for ingestion. This inflicts 1d6 points of damage in the first round, 2d6 points of damage in the second round, 3d6 points of damage in the third round, and death in the fourth round (no saving throw). Once the two tentacles have grabbed an opponent with successful hit, no further attacks are necessary to continue holding the victim.

If the Khryll is hungry it will suck the liquefied organs through its mouth-tube as food; otherwise it will lay eggs in the prepared body, and these will hatch into khryll-spawn in 1d3+1 days.

Khryll society is quite complex and byzantine; in general no more than six of them will be encountered together at one time, but in the deepest caverns beneath the earth there are unquestionably much larger populations of them. Their cities are said to be as much vertical as horizontal, with vast schools of khryll floating up the sides of underground cliffs where they have built bizarre structures and tunnels directly into the sides of their great caverns. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Khryll: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 8 tentacles (varies by round); Move 9; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Mental blast, liquefy internal organs, magic resistance (80%).

Source: Monstrosities

Killmoulis

A killmoulis is thought to be distantly related to brownies and other small, helpful fey, though it bears little physical likeness to its kin. Standing about 1 foot tall, they do not speak except through a limited form of telepathy. The race appears to be sexless. They are unnaturally thin and a bulbous head with no chin, seemingly no mouth and an immense, trunk-like nose. A kilmoulis has pale white skin and deep blue eyes.

A killmoulis gang always tries to take up residence in places of human habitation where foodstuffs are prepared or handled, dwelling beneath floorboards or in garrets or behind pantry shelves. The killmoulis has the same loyalty to its host family and eagerness to perform chores as the brownie, but unlike the brownie they are more prone to pointless but harmless mischief.

Killmoulises are inoffensive creatures, lacking any real combat capability. They do carry dagger-like needles, however, and use these to stab and pierce their opponents. Occasionally, these needles are poisoned with whatever poison is readily available.

  • Killmoulis: HD 1d4; AC 4 [15]Atk Needle (1)Move 15; Save 18; AL N; CL/XP B/10; 
    SpecialMagic resistance 25%, surprise on a roll of 1-3 on 1d6, telepathy 100 ft.

Source: Killmoulis from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Ki-Rin

Ki-rin are wind spirits, looking much like a unicorn, but with dragon-like features such as golden-scaled skin, and having a huge, flowing mane. Most are benevolent in nature, but they seldom interfere in the doings of humankind. A ki-rin can cast spells as an 18th level cleric and as an 18th level magic user.

Cleric spells: 7/7/7/7/7/4/1
Magic-user spells: 6/6/6/6/6/5/2/2/1

A common selection of spells for a ki-rin might be as follows:

Cleric

Level 1: Cure Light Wounds (x2), Detect Evil, Detect Magic, Light, Protection From Evil, Purify Food and Drink
Level 2: Bless, Find Traps, Hold Person (x2), Silence, 15-ft. Radius, Snake Charm, Speak with Animals
Level 3: Continual Light, Cure Disease, Locate Object, Prayer, Remove Curse (x2), Speak with the Dead
Level 4: Create Water, Cure Serious Wounds (x2), Neutralize Poison, Protection From Evil 10 ft. Radius, Speak With Plants, Sticks to Snakes
Level 5: Commune, Create Food, Dispel Evil, Finger of Death, Insect Plague, Quest, Raise Dead
Level 6: Animate Object, Blade Barrier, Speak with Monsters, Word of Recall
Level 7: Control Weather.

Magic-User:

Level 1: Charm Person, Detect Magic, Protection From Evil, Read Languages, Read Magic, Sleep
Level 2: ESP, Invisibility, Locate Object, Mirror Image, Phantasmal Force, Web
Level 3: Dispel Magic (x2), Fireball, Haste, Protection From Normal Missiles, Slow
Level 4: Confusion (x2), Fear, Plant Growth, Polymorph Other, Polymorph Self
Level 5: Conjure Elemental, Contact Other Plane, Telekinesis (x2), Teleport, Wall of Stone
Level 6: Death Spell, Disintegrate, Flesh to Stone, Legend Lore, Stone to Flesh
Level 7: Delayed Blast Fireball, Limited Wish
Level 8: Monster Summoning VI, Power Word Blind
Level 9: Time Stop.

  • Ki-rin: HD 12; AC –5 [24]; Atk 1 horn (3d6), 2 hoofs (1d8); Move 18 (Fly 24); Save 3; AL L; CL/XP 18/3800; Special: Spells, magical powers, magic resistance (90%).

Source: Monstrosities

Kobold

Kobolds are subterranean, vaguely goblin-like humanoids. They have a -1 penalty when fighting above ground. Many use slings or short bows, and they fight with short swords or spiked clubs in melee combat.

  • Kobold: HD 1d4hp; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 6; Save 18; AL C; CL/XP A/15; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Ko’haai

Ko’haai are large, 6-legged lizards covered in scales that coruscate with varying hues of blue. They are normally found in tropical climates where they are used as riding animals and beasts of burden by the local populace. Ko’haai possess long, powerful tongues, used to make a whip-like attack. In addition to suffering damage, the victim of this attack may have his arms pinioned if the tongue wraps around him (saving throw at -2 penalty). The bite of a Ko’haai is mildly poisonous, inflicting 1d3 points of damage (saving throw at +2 negates), and the poison has a very strange property with repeated exposures. The skin of any person who has sustained 3 or more Ko’haai bites within a week takes on a discernible bluish cast, which persists for 3d8 weeks. After six successful saving throws made against Ko’haai poison, the body develops a permanent immunity to the damaging effects of the poison, and begins to treat the poison as a mild amphetamine, providing a +1 to attack rolls and saving throws for 1d4+2 hours after being bitten (the downside to this, of course, is the damage taken from the bite itself). (Author: Andrew Trent)

  • Ko’haai: HD 3; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d6 + poison) or 1 tongue (1d4 + pinion) ; Move 6; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Poison, pinion with tongue.

Source: Monstrosities

Koi Folk

The Koi Folk are brightly colored humanoid goldfish, peaceful and amphibious peasants of Eastern lands, and generally pleasant to be around, if somewhat dull company. They are simple-minded and easily led, often prey to bullies like the Yurmp (see, “Yurmp”) or haughty local nobility. Some monks will occasionally attempt to teach the Koi Folk martial arts, and instill the drive to stand up for themselves, only to give up in frustration at these creatures’ blank-faced placidity. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Koi Folk: HD 2+1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 slap (1d3); Move 9 (Swim 12); Save 16; AL L; CL/XP 2/30; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Komodo Dragon

Komodo dragons are very large lizards with a poisonous bite (saving throw). Death from the poison takes place in 1d4 melee rounds after the bite.

  • Komodo Dragon: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d6 + poison); Move 6; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Poison bite.
  • Giant Komodo Dragon: HD 5; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (2d6 + poison); Move 9; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Poison bite.

Source: Monstrosities

Korred

A korred has the upper torso of a small humanoid and the lower torso of a goat, thus giving it a satyr-like appearance. It has a long, flowing beard, and like its hair, is tangled and matted into frightful knots. It wears a simple leather covering on which hangs a large leather pouch. Its hair is dark and its wild, brown eyes have an almost feral-like gleam in them. Korreds speak their own language.

Three times per day, a korred can unleash a laugh that stuns all creatures within 60 feet that hear it for 1d2 rounds. A saving throw negates the effects. 

A korred can weave its hair (contained in its pouch) into animated ropes that can entangle foes. The time it takes to weave enough hair to entangle one foe is dependent on the size of the creature as follows:

Size                                              Time
Dwarves, Halflings            1 round
Elves, Humans                      2 rounds
Ogres                                           3 rounds

A korred cannot entangle an opponent larger than an ogre.

  • Korred: HD 6; AC 4 [15]Atk Slam (1d4) or shears (1d6) or club (1d6); Move 12; Save 11; AL N (Chaotic tendencies); CL/XP 8/800; SpecialAnimate hair, laugh, magic resistance (30%)

Source: Korred from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Kraken

Kraken are gigantic squid-like monsters of malign, genius-level intelligence, residing in the black depths of the oceans. When kraken strike with their tentacles, they may wrap their prey and constrict them each round for an automatic 2d6 damage, also making the victim defenseless against the kraken’s bite. Ships may be constricted in the same way, typically requiring 18 tentacle-rounds to crush the vessel sufficiently to pull below to the kraken’s expansive undersea lair. Tentacles may be targeted individually and severed. They each have AC 6[13] and 16 hit points, which are not considered part of the kraken’s hit point total. Kraken retreat by jetting backwards, at which point they may release a poisonous 80ft x 80ft x 120 ft. ink cloud. For a total of four rounds, anyone within the cloud will suffer 1d4 points of damage. It is rumored that kraken possess unnatural powers to control weather and to create false lights in order to ambush or mislead sailors. (Author: Random)

  • Kraken: HD 20; AC 0 [19]; Atk 6 tentacles (2d6), bite (3d6); Move (Swim 3) (Jet 21); Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 24/5600; Special: Ink cloud, constriction, control weather, create lights.

Source: Monstrosities

Kuah-Lij

A kuah-lij resembles a halfling who has been stretched vertically to the height of a human. Its features are knobby and elongated. Its hair is light and downy, more akin to a soft fur than anything else, and its skin is white with pale blue undertones. They are natural tinkerers and enjoy creating bizarre contraptions.

  • Kuah-Lij: HD 4hp; AC 8 [11]Atk Weapon (1d4)Move 18; Save 18; AL N; CL/XP A/5; 
    Special:None

Source: Kuah-Lij from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Lance Hawvermale.

Kurok-Spirit

A kurok-spirit is a non-human spirit that manifests as a ghostly crocodile, limned with a transparent gray fire. Kuroks can only be damaged by silver or magic weapons (or by spells). Anyone within melee attack range of the creature must make a saving throw or be paralyzed by the ghost-flames around the spirit’s crocodile body. When the kurok bites an opponent, the bite causes the temporary loss of 1d4 constitution points (recovered within 1d3 days); if a victim’s constitution drops to 0 as the result of a kurok’s bite, he dies and the spirit takes his soul to eat. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Kurok-Spirit: HD 3; AC 4 [15]; Atk Bite (1d4 points of constitution); Move 9; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Drains constitution, immune to normal weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Kzaddich

This weird but benevolent race exists outside of the normal concept of time. They may come from the distant future, but could just as easily hail from the distant past or from an alternate reality altogether. When encountered, they are generally working to defy the plans of their arch-enemies, the Tsalakians (another trans-dimensional race of beings), and to organize resistance against them. The Kzaddich (singular and plural) always appear as man-sized figures, completely covered by cowled cloaks. Their own speech sounds not unlike wind chimes. When dealing with sentient creatures, they use their native telepathy. Their true form defies immediate description; uncloaked, they appear as an amalgamation of shifting, softly glowing spheres in a rough approximation of a bipedal form. The Kzaddich can slip in and out of the time-stream at will, and as a result they are exceedingly difficult to harm. They can anticipate the future actions of their opponents, resulting in their almost unhittable armor class. Moreover, they make saving throws as an 8HD creature and take half or no damage from damage-causing spells that allow saving throws, and are allowed a saving throw against spells that normally do not allow one – whether these spells cause damage or not. They are immune to all person-affecting spells (hold person, charm person, etc.) and cannot be affected by spells that affect time, such as slow or time stop. Indeed, Kzaddich can ignore the effects of these spells and even interrupt and share any beneficial effects of such magics. Kzaddich are loathe to engage in combat, but if forced, they have the innate spell-like ability to haste themselves at will. If faced with certain capture or death, a Kzaddich can, at will, simply slip into the far future or past to avoid the situation. Kzaddich have considerable mental powers. They can mentally alter the density of their bodies from a weight of 0 to 500 pounds at will, heal all damage they have suffered five times per day, levitate at will, communicate telepathically within 100ft with any creature, and read psychic impressions left upon objects. The Kzaddich do not perceive time the way others do; they can perceive the outlines of the future (90% chance to make the most favorable choice between two actions). Kzaddich can never be taken by surprise. Twice per day, a Kzaddich have the ability to create a time stop (as per the spell, with a duration of 2 combat rounds). A Kzaddich can share the time stop with another creature with which it is in physical contact. Almost nothing is known of the Kzaddich culture; they vie against the machinations of the Tsalakians on a scale that mortal creatures cannot comprehend, in a vast war that spans time and dimensions. (Author: John Turcotte)

  • Kzaddich: HD 1+1; AC -8 [27]; Atk 2 weapons (1d8); Move 12; Save 8; AL L; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Haste, improved saving throws, immune to person-affecting spells, immune to time spells, escape into future, mental powers, cannot be surprised, time stop (2/day).

Source: Monstrosities

L

Lamia

Lamias are horrid, centaur-like creatures, always female. Below the female human torso is the body of a beast, usually with a lion’s forelegs and the hindquarters of a horse – but the beast-like part can vary. A lamia can cast charm person, charm monster, and suggestion once per day, these powers often being used to lure prey into the dismal and abandoned places where the lamia lairs. In addition, the lamia’s touch drains a point of wisdom permanently from the victim. Any victim whose wisdom falls to 3 or lower becomes the lamia’s slave (one or more such slaves might be used to guard the lair or even participate in luring victims to the place).

  • Lamia: HD 9; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 24; Save 6; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Spells, touch drains wisdom.

Source: Monstrosities

Lammasu

Lammasu are akin to angels; they are human-headed, winged lions that often serve as temple guardians and agents of divine Law. Lammasu tend to be defenders of Law, temples, and cizilization rather than being active against the forces of Chaos. If the need arises, of course, a lammasu is quite capable of taking the offensive against threats to its wards – but because they are often pledged to guard particular places, people, or objects, they will often engage other servants of Law to pursue such threats. This being the case, a high level party of Lawful characters might very well be contacted by a lammasu with a request for assistance. The lammasu are usually generous with their rewards to those who are effective allies in the battle against Chaos.

  • Lamia: HD 6+2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d6); Move 12 (Fly 24); Save 11; AL L; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Invisibility at will, dimension door, protection from evil 10ft radius, spells (CL6).

Source: Monstrosities

Lamprey, Giant

Giant lampreys are slow-moving eels with a toothy, sphincter-like mouth. Once the monster scores a hit, it fastens to the victim and drains blood automatically each round thereafter until the victim is dead. Normal lampreys aren’t really dangerous enough to merit a separate entry.

  • Giant Lamprey: HD 4; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move (Swim 9); Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Sucks blood.

Source: Monstrosities

Lamprey, Land

Land lampreys are 3-foot long, blackish-green eels with large, downward facing mouths lined with sharpened teeth. They can be found in all but the hottest and the coldest environments and prefer the dark and dampness of the subterranean world and so are most often encountered there. 

If a land lamprey hits with a bite attack, it latches onto the opponent’s body and drains 1d4 hit points per round by draining the victim’s blood. An application of fire causes the land lamprey to releases its hold and move away from the source of the flame. The lamprey can also be pulled off with a successful open doors check, though doing so inflicts 1d4 points of damage. Once a land lamprey has dealt 8 points of damage, it detaches and slithers off to digest the meal. If its victim dies before the land lamprey’s appetite has been sated, the land lamprey detaches and seeks a new target.

  • Land Lamprey: HD 1; AC 3 [16]Atk Bite (1d3)Move 15; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; 
    Special: Attach, blood drain

Source: Land Lamprey from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Lamprey, Lightning

Lightning lampreys are floating creatures about three feet long that feed upon powerful electrical currents and lightning. Schools of them drift along in the wake of storm clouds. They are not normally encountered away from electrical storms (some may sniff their way down from higher altitudes if lightning is actually striking the ground). However, they might be found in unusual magical environments where electrical discharges or lightning is plentiful. Their bite inflicts one point of damage from the sharp teeth, but also delivers an electrical shock of 1d6hp. Their bodies are extremely good electrical conductors. (Author: Matt Finch, first appeared in Spire of Iron and Crystal)

  • Lightning Lamprey: HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1hp + 1d6 shock); Move (Fly 6); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Electrical bite.

Source: Monstrosities

Lantern Goat

A lantern goat has tangled and patchy gray-and-white hair, and horns and hooves that appear to be made of stone. Its eyes are stark white. Around its neck hangs a dented and ugly iron lantern that glows with a foul amber light. The scarred and battered lantern serves to channel souls into the undead creature. It emits an ugly yellow light that causes all creatures within 60 feet who see it to flee in fear (as per the spell of the same name) if they fail a save. Any creature slain while within 60 feet of a lantern goat must save or have its soul drawn into the goat’s lantern to be digested. Only a wish can return creatures to life after they have been consumed by the lantern goat.

  • Lantern Goat: HD 7 or 14; AC 3 [16]; Atk 7 HD: butt (1d8) and 2 hooves (1d6); 14 HD: butt (2d6) and 2 hooves (1d8)Move 6; Save 9 or 3; AL C; CL/XP 7 HD (10/1400); 14 HD (17/3500) SpecialFear light, soul capture

Source: Lantern Goat from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene and Lance Hawvermale.

Lava Child

This creature is a stocky humanoid standing about 5 or 6 feet tall with sooty-black hair and green eyes. It wears crudely constructed hides of fur and leather. Its face has a curious, almost child-like appearance and seems to be imprinted with a permanent, non-changing smile. Its skin is pinkish-white. Lava children make their lairs deep underground and usually in warmer climates. Some lava children build their communities in dying or burned out volcanoes as well. Their society as a whole is reclusive, and rarely do lava children have dealings with outside races (magmin and fire elementals being the exception). Lava children speak their own gibberish-like tongue.

Lava children take one extra point of damage per caster level from water spells and suffer double damage from cold spells and effects. Lava children are immune to all earth spells and to any metal object or weapon and its effects (swords, armor, doors, walls, for example). Metal simply passes through the lava child as though it did not exist. Metal items are not destroyed, just ignored. Any metal weapon (including magic weapons) that strikes a lava child deals no damage and simply passes through its body. Likewise a lava child can simply walk through metal doors or walls as though they did not exist and ignore bonuses to an opponent’s Armor Class due to metal armor.

  • Lava Child: HD 4; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4) and bite (1d6)Move 12; Save 13; AL N; 
    CL/XP 5/240; SpecialImmunity to earth magic, fire and metal, double damage from cold

Source: Lava Child from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Jim Donohoe.

Leaping Maw

A Leaping Maw is a weird form of parasite that has extra-dimensional properties. It is never encountered alone, as it requires a host of some form. A small creature can support only one Leaping Maw, but a medium-sized creature (such as a human) can support up to four, and a large creature can support nine or more. The Leaping Maw looks like a small, fanged mouth, rather wolf-like, sprouting from a host creature’s body. The body is a fist-sized lump, hidden within the host’s body, and the host must usually be slain in order to get to it. The Leaping Maw is able to teleport itself directly onto any flesh within 30ft, and if it scores three successful hits it has burrowed into the victim’s flesh. It cannot attack anyone who is employing a protection from evil spell. Use of a dimension door within 10ft of a leaping maw kills one leaping maw per 3 levels of the caster. Teleport will drive them out from the host. If a leaping maw remains in a host for a week, the host begins to experience surreal and vivid dreams and hallucinations that cause a permanent loss of 1 Wisdom point per leaping maw per month. When the victim reaches wisdom of 0, he becomes completely controlled by the parasites, a puppet for breeding and transmission. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Leaping Maw: HD 1; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 0 (Teleport 30 ft.); Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Teleport, occupy host, attack against unarmored AC.

Source: Monstrosities

Leech, Giant

Giant leeches are about one and a half feet long per hit die. After they score a hit, they drain blood automatically at one hit point per hit die of the creature. These are nasty creatures to find inhabiting the murky, muddy waters of a dungeon or swamp.

  • HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 3; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Sucks blood (1 hp/round).
  • HD 2; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 3; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Sucks blood (2 hp/round).
  • HD 3; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 3; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Sucks blood (3 hp/round).
  • HD 4; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 3; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Sucks blood (4 hp/round).
  • HD 5; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 3; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Sucks blood (5 hp/round).
  • HD 6; AC 9 [10]; Atk 1 bite (1d4); Move 3; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Sucks blood (6 hp/round).

Source: Monstrosities

Leech, Giant (II)

Giant leeches appear as larger versions of the common leech. There is a 50% chance that any leech encountered carries disease. A giant leech attacks any living creature that comes within 30 feet of it.

If a giant leech hits with a bite attack, it latches onto the opponent’s body. An attached giant leech drains blood, dealing 1d6 points of damage per round. Once it has dealt 12 points of damage, it detaches and slithers off to digest the meal. If its victim dies before the giant leech’s appetite has been sated, the giant leech detaches and seeks a new target. A giant leech can be pulled off with a successful open doors check, but doing so inflicts 1d6 points of damage.

A giant leech takes 1d4 points of damage per pound of salt poured on its body.

  • Giant Leech: HD 2; AC 8 [11]Atk Bite (1d6); Move 3/9 (swimming); Save 16; AL N; 
    CL/XP 3/60; SpecialAttach, blood drain, disease, salt vulnerability

Source: Giant Leech from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Garty Gygax.

Leopard

Leopards are small, roaring great cats, standing about 2 ft. tall at the shoulder. They are not quite as fast as the other great cats, but they are stealthy hunters.

  • Leopard: HD 3; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d6); Move 16; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Lephane

The Lephane is a semi-aquatic relative of the Elephant, adapted for dwelling in rivers and lakes. The main body, resembling a boulder, is a shrivelled and shrunken mass, although it is still almost the size of a normal elephant’s. The head is barely recognizable as an elephant’s, as the ears are atrophied lumps; the trunk is much longer than that of a normal elephant. The lephane attacks by grabbing and constricting with its long, muscular trunk from underwater. Once it has struck, it can apply continuous damage per round and can drag victims underwater. If the lephane manages to drag its prey all the way to its mouth, it can also bite for 1d6 damage. In general, any creature attacking it while it is in the water will suffer a -2 penalty to hit and damage (except with spears or other good underwater weapons). Breaking free from the lephane’s trunk can be managed on a roll of 1-2 on a d6.

The lephane is an accomplished swimmer, but lazy. It prefers to walk along a river bottom, poking the tip of its trunk above the water to breathe. Like its land-bound kin, it has ivory tusks that will fetch a fine reward: 100-400gp per tusk. Unlike its land-bound kin, the lephane is omnivorous; it can survive on roots and leaves, but it prefers fresh meat. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Lephane: HD 7; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 trunk (2d4+constriction), 1 bite (1d6); Move 6; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Constriction, pull beneath water.

Source: Monstrosities

Leprechaun

Leprechauns are fey creatures, usually portrayed as irrational and possibly quite malevolent (although they have the common fey characteristic of being bound by bargains they make). They are somewhat magic resistant (10%), and are extremely elusive. They can become invisible and dimension door at will. They can also cast phantasmal force once per day.

  • Leprechaun: HD 1; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 18; Save 15; AL N; CL/XP 5/400; Special: Magic resistance (10%), magic abilities.

Source: Monstrosities

Leprechaun (II)

Leprechauns are short fey creatures, about 2 feet tall. They favor brightly colored clothes, particularly greens and reds. Leprechauns are a jovial people, enjoying fine food and drink; some leprechauns also enjoy a good smoke from a long-stemmed pipe. They are a tricky folk and enjoy jokes and pranks, although they usually do not appreciate being the victims of such acts.

Most leprechauns are skilled pickpockets (as 8th level thieves), and it is a favored prank of these wee folk to filch items from unsuspecting travelers in their domain and then taunt the intruders into pursuit. The leprechaun so involved in the prank often alternates between being visible and invisible as he teases and pesters his pursuers in a merry chase. Leprechauns tire of pranks quickly, however, and will give up the stolen item and sneak away. Some say leprechauns are descendants of halflings and pixies. Leprechauns summarily dismiss this rumor, however, scoffing at those who repeat it.

Leprechauns can cast invisibility (self only), phantasmal force, polymorph (objects only) and ventriloquism at will.

  • Leprechaun: HD 1d6; AC 5 [14]Atk Dagger (1d3); Move 15; Save 18 (16 vs. magic); AL N; 
    CL/XP 3/60; SpecialSpells, magic resistance 60%

Source: Leprechaun from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Garty Gygax.

Leucrota

The leucrota has a badger’s head and a lion’s body, but with cloven hooves instead of claws. Its toothy mouth stretches from ear to ear (and delivers a deadly bite). The original description of a leucrota comes from Pliny the Elder, writing in the first century.

  • Leucrota: HD 6; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (3d6); Move 18; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Lich

Liches are the undead remnants of wizards, either made undead by their own deliberate acts during life, or as the result of other magical forces (possibly including their own magics gone awry). A lich has the same number of hit dice as the original Magic-User and the same spell-casting powers. A lich’s touch causes paralysis with no saving throw, and the very sight of one of these dread creatures causes any being of 4 HD or below to flee in abject terror. Liches are highly intelligent and totally malign.

  • Lich (12 HD): HD 12; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 hand (1d10 + automatic paralysis); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Appearance causes paralytic fear, touch causes automatic paralysis, spells.
  • Lich (13 HD): HD 13; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 hand (1d10 + automatic paralysis); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 16/3200; Special: Appearance causes paralytic fear, touch causes automatic paralysis, spells.
  • Lich (14 HD): HD 14; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 hand (1d10 + automatic paralysis); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 17/3500; Special: Appearance causes paralytic fear, touch causes automatic paralysis, spells.
  • Lich (15 HD): HD 15; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 hand (1d10 + automatic paralysis); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 18/3800; Special: Appearance causes paralytic fear, touch causes automatic paralysis, spells.
  • Lich (16 HD): HD 16; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 hand (1d10 + automatic paralysis); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 19/4100; Special: Appearance causes paralytic fear, touch causes automatic paralysis, spells.
  • Lich (17 HD): HD 17; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 hand (1d10 + automatic paralysis); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 20/4400; Special: Appearance causes paralytic fear, touch causes automatic paralysis, spells.
  • Lich (18 HD): HD 18; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 hand (1d10 + automatic paralysis); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 21/4700; Special: Appearance causes paralytic fear, touch causes automatic paralysis, spells.

Source: Monstrosities

Lich Shade

A lich shade is a rotting and skeletal humanoid dressed in tattered and worn robes with ancient runes etched on their surface. Its eye blaze with a crimson fire. Lich shades are evil creatures who attempted to achieve lichdom but failed. A lich shade stands about 6 to 6-1/2 feet tall and weighs about 160 pounds. The robes and gowns it wears often denote its previous life’s profession. A lich shade’s touch is supernaturally cold, so any creature struck by one of its claws must save or be dazed for 1 round. When reduced to 0 hit points, a lich shade crumbles into a pile of dust equivalent to dust of sneezing and choking. When a spellcaster within 50 feet of a lich shade attempts to cast a spell, he must save or lose the spell as it is absorbed by the creature. The lich shade can cast the spell on its next turn, turn the spell into a bolt of magic energy (similar to a magic missile) that does 1d6 points of damage per two levels of the original spell cast, or gain a number of hit points equal to the spell level x 4.

  • Lich Shade: HD 11; AC 6 [13]Atk 2 claws (1d6 + chill); Move 9; Save 4; AL C; 
    CL/XP 14/2600; Special: Chill, death throes, spell leech, resists cold and electricity, spell resistance (22%) 

Source: Lich Shade from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Lichenthrope

Lichenthropes are human (or similar) creatures that have been infected by a carefully prepared mixture of spores and alchemical ingredients. This infusion causes a condition with effects similar enough to lycanthropy that the infected victims are treated as were-creatures for all purposes except one. Because lichenthropy is an alchemical condition rather than a supernatural one, lichenthropes are not immune to normal weapons, as true were-creatures are. They are, on the other hand, still affected by magic weapons that are especially enchanted against were-creatures.

At will, a lichenthrope can take one of two non-human forms in addition to its human one. The first of these is a noisome agglomeration of fungus-material shaped somewhat like a dog. In this form, the lichenthrope is resistant to magic (25%) and immune to any sort of mental control that would not ordinarily affect a plant. The second non-human form of a lichenthrope is a formless mass of fungus with an air bladder that allows it to fly, provided that it has a full combat round to inhale air.

Lichenthropes can commune with any form of intelligent plant, although they do not exert actual control over such plants.

Any character suffering 50% damage from the attacks of a lichenthrope will begin transforming into a lichenthrope. However, since the process of lichenthropy is alchemical and normally induced directly by a creator of lichenthropes, the transformation does not always proceed in a predictable way. There is a 50% chance that an infected character will simply turn progressively into a mess of disgusting fungus over the course of 1d4 weeks. During this time, whether the transformation is proceeding normally or not, the process can be arrested and cured by the use of a cure disease spell. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Lichenthrope: HD 3; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 14; CL/XP 5/2400; Special: Shapechange, 25% magic resistance (in hound form only), contagion.

Source: Monstrosities

Linnorm

Linnorms look like massive serpents with draconic heads. Linnorms never speak, nor do they have spell-casting ability. Linnorms attack with their bite which deals grievous damage and injects a deadly poison into their opponents (save or die). A linnorm may also constrict an opponent for 3d4 points of damage per round. If a linnorm attacks with its bite and 4 or more than the number needed in rolled on its attack dice, the victim is swallowed whole. Swallowed victims suffer 2d4 hit points of damage per round and may only strike back at the linnorm with short weapons. The inside of a linnorm is considered armor class 8[11].

Linnorms share the size categories and age categories of dragons. They are deaf, detecting heat and vibration, and are therefore unaffected by silence and invisibility. Thrice per day, linnorms may breathe a cloud of poisonous gas 30ft long, 20ft wide, and 10ft high, which deals damage equal to the linnorm’s full hit points (save for half damage). Linnorms may not be subdued and are immune to poison. They are excellent swimmers and sometimes lair in or near large bodies of water. (Author: John Turcotte, © 2006)

  • Adult (7 HD): HD 7; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite (3d6 + poison) and 1 constrict (3d4); Move 12 (Swim 12); Save 9; AL C: CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Poison, constrict, swallow whole, immune to poison, silence and invisibility, breath weapon.

Source: Monstrosities

Lion

A lioness has an AC of 7 [12], but is otherwise similar to the male lion. The first lion encountered will be male; all the rest in the encounter will be lionesses.

  • Lion: HD 5+2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), 1 bite (1d8); Move 12; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Lithonnite

Lithonnites are huge mollusk-like creatures, about one ton in weight, living in subterranean and surface environments. The front of a lithonnite’s body is encased in a powerful shell, even to the rock-like eyelids. When the rest of the lithonnite’s body is concealed in a grotto or under water, the shell appears like a boulder or other natural rock. It is not possible for the lithonnite to draw its soft body entirely into the shell. In combat, the lithonnite reaches around its shell with two slug-like tentacles to attack. The creature’s frontal portion, protected by the shell, can be attacked by any sort of weapon; behind the shell, the soft body is AC 6[13], but cannot be affected by blunt weapons due to its boneless consistency. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Lithonnite: HD 8; AC 2 [17] (frontal shell), 6[13] (body); Atk 2 tentacles (2d6); Move 9; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Body immune to blunt weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Livestone

Livestone is a strange species of ooze that can solidify itself into a consistency that very closely resembles that of stone. In its solidified form, a livestone is indistinguishable from a normal boulder or slab of rock. No one is quite sure from where livestones originated, but ancient legends say that the dwarves accidentally unleashed these horrors on the surface world by digging into their subterranean lairs. Eventually, some livestones found their way to the surface.

Livestones are incredibly long-lived, solidifying and entering a form of hibernation and remaining that way indefinitely until a food source wanders too near. Livestones have a simple chameleon-like ability to mimic local stone by ingesting a small sample and adjusting its own color and texture to match. A hibernating livestone can become covered in moss and lichens to further the deception.

Livestones generally attack from ambush, waiting for a potential meal to pass before flowing into their ooze form and rushing up to engulf the prey. If the surprise attack fails, a livestone resorts to hammering with pseudopods. When attacking in this manner, a livestone will solidify the tip of the pseudopod and strike with a hammer-like blow. A livestone’s usual tactic is to solidify the half of its body facing the prey and then send hard-tipped pseudopods out from behind this shield.

A livestone can simply mow down human-sized or smaller creatures by moving over them. It cannot make a slam attack during a round in which it engulfs. The livestone affects as many creatures as it can cover. Opponents can attempt a saving throw to avoid being engulfed; on a success, they are pushed back or aside (opponent’s choice) as the livestone moves forward. An engulfed opponent takes 1 point of damage per round as the livestone consumes it (unless the livestone solidifies itself).

A livestone that has engulfed an opponent can instantly solidify its form, dealing 8d6 points of crushing damage per round to the trapped victim (saving throw for half damage).

An engulfed creature can be freed by killing the livestone or by casting stone to flesh on the livestone. This deals 1d6 points of damage per caster level to the livestone and automatically ejects an engulfed victim. 

An opponent attacking a livestone must succeed on a saving throw each time his attack hits. If the save is failed, the livestone actually solidifies the portion of its body at the instant it was hit, cutting damage in half. A livestone cannot attack if its entire form is solidified. 

Livestones surprise on a roll of 1-4 on 1d6 in stony areas.

  • Livestone: HD 5; AC 10 [9]Atk Slam (1d8); Move 9; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 7/600; 
    Special: Engulf, solidify, immunity to petrification, surprise on 1-4 on 1d6

Source: Livestone from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Living Lake (Agrath-Ogh)

Hundreds of feet across, a living lake is an ooze of truly colossal proportions. The protoplasmic body of a living lake is fluid in nature and transparent in water. A living lake attacks by forming pseudopods from its oozy form and pummeling its opponents. The ooze can raise a portion of itself off the ground and come crashing down on opponents who must save or be engulfed into the ooze and “drown” in the living lake. A living lake casts spells as a 9th-level druid.

  • Living Lake: HD 16; AC 2 [17]Atk 4 slams (3d8); Move 6; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 17/3500; 
    Special: Engulf, spells

Source: Living Lake from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Lizard Samurai

Lizard samurai come from some unknown race of bipedal lizards, possibly from the spirit world, possibly from another dimension, possibly from far lands. They are only encountered in elaborate armor, bearing sharp swords and sometimes with longbows. Lizard samurai follow a strict code of combat, but consider humans of non-fighting social class to be animals virtually beneath their notice. When venturing into human lands, they are normally formed into well-organized military units, sometimes with members of some other race serving as auxiliary troops. These military units generally consist of at least 20 of the lizard samurai, and are always led by a captain with 6 hit dice. Lizard samurai make all saving throws at +1 (already reflected in the statistics). (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Lizard Samurai: HD 3; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 sword (1d8) or 2 arrows (1d6); Move 9; Save 14; AL any; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Improved saving throw.
  • Lizard Samurai Captain: HD 6; AC 2 [17]; Atk 1 sword (1d8) or 2 arrows (1d6); Move 9; Save 11; AL any; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Improved saving throw.

Source: Monstrosities

Lizard, Cavern

Cavern lizard are 8-foot-long gray lizards with wide feet and sapphire-gold bulging eyes. Their legs are thick and muscled and their large feet have small suction cup-like pads on the bottoms that aid in climbing. Its head is angular and somewhat flat. Its mouth sports a row of long, serrated teeth. These very aggressive hunters latch onto prey with their bite, automatically dealing damage each round thereafter.

  • Cavern Lizard: HD 4; AC 5 [14]Atk 1 bite (2d4); Move 9/6 (climb); Save 13; AL N; 
    CL/XP 4/120Special: Grab

Source: Cavern Lizard from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Lizard, Fire

Fire lizards are often called “false dragons.” Despite their general resemblance to dragons, sages have as yet found no evidence of these creatures being in any way related to them. Fire lizards look like wingless dragons with gray scales dappled in red and brown. Its underbelly is bright red and its yes are black with yellow pupils. A fire lizard is averages 30 feet long but can grow to almost twice that size. Fire lizards do not associate with or keep company with dragons. Once every 1d4 rounds, a fire lizard can breathe fire in a 20-foot cone. Creatures in the area take 2d6 points of fire damage (saving throw for half).

  • Fire Lizard: HD 10+1; AC 2 [17]Atk 2 claws (1d8), bite (2d6); Move 12; Save 5; AL N; 
    CL/XP 11/1700Special: Breathe fire, immunity to fire, double damage from cold

Source: Fire Lizard from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Lizard, Giant

Giant lizards (the ones described here, in any case) are about 4ft tall at the shoulder (not quite large enough to ride). Larger specimens could certainly be found – perhaps they continue to grow throughout their long lives, leading to giant lizards of close to saurian dimensions.

  • Giant Lizard: HD 3; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 12; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Lizard, Gnasher

A gnasher lizard is typically 10 feet to 20 feet long and weighs about 1,000 pounds. Gnasher lizards have a wide gaping maw filled with double rows of dagger-like teeth. Its head is large and flat and sports a ridge of hardened bone that runs the length of its head before tapering off near the middle of its back. Its four legs end in large, flat clawed feet. A gnasher lizard that rolls 4 or higher than needed to hit a creature swallows the victim whole. If the lizard rolls a natural 20, it severs an opponent’s limb.

  • Gnasher Lizard: HD 8; AC 6 [13]Atk 1 bite (1d8); Move 10; Save 8; AL N; 
    CL/XP 7/600Special: swallow whole, severing bite

Source: Gnasher Lizard from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Lizard, Lightning

Lightning lizards stand 5-ft. in height and may reach a length of 14ft. Their scales are a shimmering blue and sparks of lightning constantly crackle around their maw. Lightning lizards have sometimes been used as mounts for powerful orcish chiefs or tribal lords.

A lightning lizard may spew a crackling stream of lightning to assault its foes twice per day. A successful save halves the damage. Lightning lizards are immune to electrical based attacks or spells.

A rare breed of flying lightning lizards are known to exist. They are identical to their earthbound kin with the addition of massive wings which give them a flying movement of 18 (which adjusts the CL/XP to 8/800). (Author: Skathros)

  • Lightning Lizard: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), 1 bite (1d8) or Lighting Blast (4d6); Move 12; Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Lightning blast.

Source: Monstrosities

Lizardman

Lizardmen are reptilian humanoids, both male and female, usually living in tribal villages in the depths of fetid swamps. Some can hold their breath for long durations (an hour or more), while others can actually breathe underwater.

  • Lizardman: HD 2+1; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d6); Move 6 (Swim 12); Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Breathe underwater.

Source: Monstrosities

Lobster-Giant

The Lobster-Giants are strange and rare creatures, living in swamps and remote coastal shallows. They are not related either to giants or to lobsters, save for the fact that they are indeed a bizarre form of intelligent (albeit somewhat stupid) crustaceans. In addition to a pair of large pincers, lobster-giants have a ridge of smaller “arms” along the length of the underbelly, and these smaller limbs are coated with a paralytic poison.

Lobster-Giants attack with their two pincers, and if they succeed in hitting an opponent with both pincers, they have also managed to grab hold and hug the opponent to their chests, where the smaller limbs can scrabble through armor and scratch with the poison. A victim who has been grabbed will suffer an additional 2d6 attacks, and for of these that hits a saving throw is required to avoid being paralyzed for 1d10 turns. A character is allowed to attempt breaking out of the giant’s pincer-grip each round, which is done by rolling 4d6. If the resulting number is equal to or lower than the character’s strength, the character has escaped. (From Black Monastery, detailed by Matt Finch)

  • Lobster-Giant: HD 10; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 pincers (2d6); Move 9 (Swim 9); Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Grab for 2d6 extra paralysis attacks when hitting with both pincers.

Source: Monstrosities

Lurker Above

The lurker above is a subterranean carnivore that preys on any living creatures that enter its territory. It looks something like a massive manta ray. Its body is black on the top and gray on the underbelly. A lurker’s underbelly tends to blend in with stone, allowing a lurker pressed against a ceiling a 4 in 6 chance to surprise opponents below.

Lurkers above are extremely territorial and are never encountered with others of their kind. Mating habits among lurkers is unknown to sages as no two of these creatures have ever been encountered together. A typical lurker above has a hunting territory of several square miles.

A lurker above can try to wrap a creature in its body as an attack that ignores armor bonuses to Armor Class. If successful, it establishes a hold and deals buffet damage each round the hold is maintained. A wrapped opponent must hold its breath or suffocate. A grabbed opponent can hold her breath for 2 rounds per point of constitution. Attacks that hit an engulfing lurker above deal half their damage to the monster and half to the trapped victim.

Lurker Below

The lurker below is an aquatic variety of lurker above that makes its lair in any body of water and in any climate (though it rarely lairs in extremely cold climates). Lurkers below are pale blue or black in color and are often mistaken for giant manta rays. Lurkers below cannot fly, but have a swim speed of 15. They are otherwise identical to their land-based counterparts detailed above, except they lie in wait on the sea floor and attack from below.

  • Lurker Above: HD 10; AC 4 [15]Atk Buffet (1d8); Move 6/15 (flying); Save 5; AL N; 
    CL/XP 12/2000Special: Amorphous, smother, half damage from blunt weapons

Source: Lurker Above from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Lurker, Ceiling

Lurkers resemble floating manta rays, with a rough, stone-like undersurface. They levitate to ceiling-tops and wait for prey to walk underneath, whereupon they drop and enfold the victim in their thick “wings” (to-hit roll). Anyone trapped inside a lurker’s clutches takes 1d6 points of damage per round from crushing, and will suffocate within 1d4+1 rounds unless the lurker is killed. There is normally only a 10% chance to detect a lurker’s presence visually before it attacks, and it has a 65% chance to gain initiative automatically (unless a “surprise roll” system is being used, in which case the lurker has a 4 in 6 chance to gain surprise).

  • HD 10; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 crush (1d6); Move 1 (Fly 7); Save 5; AL N; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Smother.

Source: Monstrosities

Lycanthropes

Lycanthropes are were-creatures, particularly those in whom the disease permits assumption of a hybrid form of the human and animal. They cannot be hit by normal weapons: only silver and magical weapons affect them. If anyone is attacked and brought below 50% hit points by a lycanthrope, the person will become a lycanthrope himself.

Werebear

Werebears are often found in temperate forests. On an attack roll of 18+ (natural roll) with its claws, the werebear grabs its victim and hugs it for an additional 2d8 points of damage.

  • HD 7+3; AC 2 [17]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (2d4); Move 9; Save 9; AL N or C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Lycanthropy.

Wereboar

Wereboars are often found in the remote wilderness.They can take the form of a boar, a human, or a boar-like biped.

  • HD 5+2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 12; Save 12; AL N or C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Lycanthropy, hit only by magic or silver weapons

Wererat

Wererats are often found in cities, lurking in shadowy alleyways. Wererats can control rats, and are extremely stealthy, surprising opponents on 1–4 on a d6.

  • HD 3; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 bite (1d3), 1 weapon (1d6); Move 12; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Lycanthropy, control rats, surprise, hit only by magic or silver weapons.

Weretiger

Weretigers are often found in tropical cities and ancient jungle ruins, but will appear in more temperate climates as well, if tigers live in the surrounding wilderness. These lycanthropes can assume the form of a tiger, a human, or a bipedal, tiger-like hybrid of the two forms.

  • HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 claws (1d4), 1 bite (1d10); Move 12; Save 11; AL N or C; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Lycanthropy, hit only by magic or silver weapons.

Wereweasel

Wereweasels tend to be aggressive, cruel and vicious. In their lycanthrope form, they are sleek and quick, biting for 2d4 hit points of damage in addition to any weapons they may wield. They continue to drain blood after a successful bite, inflicting an additional 2d4 points of damage per melee round until slain or until they release their prey. As with other were-creatures, the bite also has a chance to inflict lycanthropy. These lithe creatures are fast, gaining a +1 bonus on initiative rolls. Wereweasels are often found with 1d4 giant weasels, which obey their commands. In human form, wereweasels tend to be thin and wiry, dark of aspect with sharp features. (Author: John Turcotte)

  • HD 3+2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 bite (1d6) and weapon (1d8); Move 15; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Drain blood, lycanthropy, +1 initiative, hit only by magical or silver weapons.

Werewolf

Werewolves are the traditional Lycanthropes seen in horror movies. They can turn into a wolf or into a wolf-man. Wolvesbane keeps them at bay.

  • HD 4+4; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d6+1); Move 12; Save 13; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Lycanthropy, hit only by magic or silver weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Lynx, Giant

If a giant lynx hits with both of its front claws, it can make 2 more attacks with its rear claws. These large cats are found in the cold wilderness, where they hide in trees waiting for prey, then leap to the attack. They are highly intelligent, and can communicate with each other when coordinated action is needed. As with the common lynx, giant lynx are well camouflaged, and if waiting in ambush they will surprise opponents (5 in 6 chance).

  • HD 2; AC 6 [13]; Atk 2 claws (1d2), 1 bite (1d4); Move 12; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Rear claws, surprise

Source: Monstrosities

Lythic

Lythics are 5- or 6-foot-tall humanoids composed of smoothly-carved rock. Their features are human-like but emotionless. Related to earth elementals, lythics are shy creatures that tend to flee rather than confront people. They are experts at blending into stone, and use this camouflage technique to seemingly vanish if threatened. Lythics can glide effortlessly stone and dirt like a fish through water.

  • Lythic: HD 3; AC 4 [15]Atk 2 slams (1d4+2); Move 12/18 (burrowing); Save 14; AL N; 
    CL/XP 3/60Special: Earth glide, blend with stone

Source: Lythic from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

M

Macaw, Giant

Giant macaws are not predators, but they are highly territorial and very dangerous, being as large as a tall man. They have brilliant green, blue, or red plumage, and are generally found in tropical regions. The giant macaw attacks with a wickedly powerful beak. They are ordinarily found in mated pairs, and their feathers can usually be sold for a tidy sum. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Giant Macaw: HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 beak (1d10); Move 6 (Fly 20); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Magmoid

Magmoids are large, sentient, spherical balls of liquid fire and rock about 10 feet across. Small bubbling pockets on the magmoid’s form serve as sensory organs. A giant magmoid, measuring 30 feet across is thought to exist, though none have ever seen it. A magmoid attacks by spraying a blast of superheated magma at opponents or by slamming into and rolling over them. The magmoid’s body is composed of molten rock that melts any nonmagical weapon that hits it. Once every 1d4 rounds, a magmoid can release a line of magma up to 40 feet (2d6 damage, save for half).

  • Magmoid: HD 8; AC 2 [17]Atk 1 flaming slam (2d6); Move 9; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100 
    Special: Melt normal weapons, magma blast, immune to fire, sleep and poison

Source: Magmoid from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Magnesium Spirit

Magmoids are large, sentient, spherical balls of liquid fire and rock about 10 feet across. Small bubbling pockets on the magmoid’s form serve as sensory organs. A giant magmoid, measuring 30 feet across is thought to exist, though none have ever seen it. A magmoid attacks by spraying a blast of superheated magma at opponents or by slamming into and rolling over them. The magmoid’s body is composed of molten rock that melts any nonmagical weapon that hits it. Once every 1d4 rounds, a magmoid can release a line of magma up to 40 feet (2d6 damage, save for half).

  • Magnesium Spirit: HD 6; AC 5 [14]Atk Touch (2 strength); Move 18; Save 11; AL C; 
    CL/XP 11/1700 Special: Blinding flash, level drain, strength damage, possession, magic resistance (40%), vulnerability to holy water

Source: Magnesium Spirit from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Nick Louth.

Malcarna

Malcarnae are female creatures with a four-armed human torso and the lower body of a great, writhing serpent, fifteen feet long. These horrible creatures are one of the many possible teratomorphs that may result from human congress with demons, most commonly an incubus. In some cases they may also be hatched from clutches of eggs laid by Marilith demons following events too hideous to contemplate. When they are born into any but the most depraved human societies they are usually killed at birth, so they are seldom found upon the material planes. Malcarnae generally arm themselves with a shield and three weapons, and can also attack with their lashing tails for 1d8 points of damage. Despite the horrible shape of these creatures, they are obscenely beautiful; creatures of fewer than 4 hit dice cannot attack them, and opponents with 4 or more hit dice must make a saving throw to succeed with any attempted physical attack. They are immune to normal weapons (other than silver ones) and have magic resistance of 25%. The human parentage of the malcarnae prevents them from being turned by a cleric. Some malcarnae may have clerical spell casting ability. (Author: Matt Finch, first appeared in Footprints magazine)

  • Malcarna: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 tail (1d8) and up to 3 weapons (1d8); Move 12; Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Magic resistance 25%, hit only by magic or silver weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Malformian

Malformians are the result of magical breeding experiments. They are ugly human-like creatures, often of misshapen proportions, crossbred by insane wizards from humans, goblinoids, animals, and even beings summoned from other worlds. No two malformians look alike; one might be covered in warts and tufts of fur, a second might have useless atrophied wings growing from its back, a third might have eyes and hands of mismatched sizes, and so on. Their various deformities tend to hinder their movement. Any weapons and possessions will be makeshift in nature, such as clubs, staves, crudely stitched cloaks, etc. Gangs of malformians make hideouts in wilderness ruins or subterranean lairs; they do not interact with civilization except as occasional predators and raiders. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Malformian: HD 1+2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 9; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 1/15; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Mammoth

Mammoths are huge, shaggy precursors to elephants, larger and more feral, with great, curving tusks. They might be trained as mounts by snow-barbarians. If a lone mammoth is encountered, there is a 50% chance that it is sick or old (no more than 4hp per HD) and a 50% chance that it is a young bull (no fewer than 4hp per HD).

  • Mammoth: HD 12; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 trunk (1d10), 2 gore (1d10+4), 2 trample (2d6+4); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: None.

Source: Monstrosities

Mandragora

The mandragora is a vaguely humanoid looking plant creature with mottled green and brown flesh. Its lower roots are splayed and resemble legs and feet. Its upper roots are long and resemble humanoid arms. Its head, if it could be called that, is a mass of solid vegetable matter covered in lumps. The mandragora stands about 5 feet tall and weighs about 120 pounds.

The mandragora is carnivorous and relishes the taste of human flesh. If it goes more than three days without devouring flesh, it burrows into the ground and attaches to local tree roots, from which it draws its sustenance until living prey can be found.

A mandragora attempts to grab its prey and strangle it, inflicting 1d4 points of damage per round. Slain creatures are covered in a thick layer of mucus and slime and devoured at the mandragora’s leisure.

Abrupt exposure to bright light stuns the mandragora for 1 round. On subsequent rounds, they are dazzled and suffer a -1 penalty to hit as long as they remain in the affected area.

  • Mandragora: HD 1; AC 3 [16]Atk 2 tentacle slaps (1d4); Move 12/9 (burrowing); 
    Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 3/60 Special: Constrict, light blindness, resistance to fire (50%), magic resistance (10%)

Source: Mandragora from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Mantari

Mantari sustain themselves on a diet of rats, carrion, and subterranean plants, but prefer the taste of fresh meat, particularly humans and gnomes. Mantari appear as large manta rays, gray in color, with a long smooth tail that ends in a sharpened barb. The mantari flies silently through its underground world in search of prey, and when encountered, it is often hungry and immediately attacks.

  • Mantari: HD 1; AC 5 [14]Atk Tail sting (1d6); Move 3/24 (flying); Save 17; AL C; 
    CL/XP 2/30 Special: None

Source: Mantari from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by David Wormell.

Manticore

This horrid monster has bat wings, the face of a feral human, the body of a lion, and a tail tipped with 24 iron spikes. The manticore can hurl up to 6 of the iron spikes from its tail per round, at a maximum range of 180 ft.

  • Manticore: HD 6+4; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d8), 6 tail spikes (1d6); Move 12 (Fly 18); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Flies, tail spikes.

Source: Monstrosities

Mantidrake

A mantidrake is a cross between a dragon and a manticore. A typical mantidrake is about 10 to 12 feet long and weighs about 1,100 to 1,300 pounds. Its draconic head is scaled and is the same color as its dragon parent. A mantidrake’s breath weapon depends on its dragon heritage. Regardless of its type, a mantidrake’s breath weapon is usable once every 1d4 rounds, deals 5d8 points of damage, and allows a save for half damage: black, 60-foot line of acid; blue, 60-foot line of lightning; green, 30-foot cone of gas; red, 30-foot cone of fire; and white, 30-foot cone of cold). A mantidrake has 24 iron spikes on its tail. It can hurl up to 6 of the spikes per round, to a maximum range of 180 feet.

  • Mantidrake: HD 9+2; AC 3 [16]Atk 2 claws (1d3), 1 bite (1d8), 6 tail spikes (1d6); 
    Move 12/18 (flying); Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: breath weapon, spikes

Source: Mantidrake from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by David Wormell.

Mantis, Giant Praying

The giant praying mantis is ten feet long, with a bark-like exoskeleton which makes it blend well into forest terrain (desert varieties have chitin with a sand-like texture). The huge insect attacks with blinding speed, usually by surprise, reaching forth with its jointed, serrated front limbs to grab prey. If the mantis hits, and the victim fails a saving throw, the forearms not only do damage but pull the victim close to the mantis’ mouth. The victim is held thereafter (not helpless, but unable to pull away) with the mantis doing automatic damage with the serrated forearms and also attacking with its bite for an additional 1d12 points of damage (rolls required to see if the bite hits).

  • Giant Praying Mantis: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 grab (1d12); Move 9; Save 8; AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Bite (1d12).

Source: Monstrosities

Marble Snake

The marble snake has whitish-gray scales, translucent in places where its underlying veins can be seen. The snake’s head is long and has a large lion-like mane of golden fur. Two long sharp fangs protrude from its mouth. Its multi-faceted eyes are red. A typical marble snake is 10 feet long and can grow to a length of 20 feet.

Unlike normal snakes, it adapts very well to its environment, hence it can be found just about anywhere, though underground encounters are rare. The marble snake prefers sunlight and warmth to the cold and darkness of dungeons and caverns and most often makes its lair in high, sunny altitudes. 

Typically an encounter is with a single marble snake. In instances where more than one is encountered, they will a mated pair and young. A female marble snake is usually only encountered during mating season (when she lays 1d10 eggs). Marble snake eggs are milky-white with gray-brown flecks. An egg can fetch up to 5 gp on the open market.

A marble snake can whistle, gaining the attention of any creature within 50 feet that hears it. All creatures (other than marble snakes) with the area must succeed on a saving throw or become entranced. An entranced victim walks toward the marble snake, taking the most direct route available. If the path leads into a dangerous area, that creature gets a second saving throw. The effect continues for as long as the marble snake whistles and for 1 round thereafter. An entranced victim is effectively dazed, and cannot attack, but can defend itself. If an entranced opponent is attacked, the effect is immediately broken.

  • Marble Snake: HD 3; AC 7 [12]Atk Bite (1d6); Move 9/9 (climbing); Save 14; AL N; 
    CL/XP 4/120; Special: Whistle

Source: Marble Snake from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley, based on original material by Jean Wells.

Marrosian Statue

Marrosian Statues are animated statues of human warriors created from a rare, magical marble-like stone frequently used by a lost civilization. Marrosian Statues move with a silent, fluid grace that belies their inorganic nature. Creatures damaged by a Marrosian Statue must make a saving throw or suffer from a deep, soul-chilling cold that radiates outward from the wound. Failure results in a -2 to all subsequent saving throws and combat rolls. This penalty dissipates over the course of the following 24 hours.

Marrosian Statues are partially immune to damage from slashing and piercing weapons, taking only half damage from these sources. (Author: Andrew Trent)

  • Marrosian Statue: HD 3; AC 1 [18]; Atk 1 stone weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 14; AL Any; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Soul Chill, Slashing/Piercing Resistance.

Source: Monstrosities

Maun-Ge

The Maun-Ge are transparent-skinned humanoids. They live alone among humans in remote settlements, usually wearing lacquered wooden masks and an enveloping outer garment that cloaks the entire body. All Maun-Ge are female and will eventually mate with a human male to produce a sole Maun-Ge child. They are able to commune with the spirits of their ancestors who offer guidance, praise and censure to their descendant. With the ability to draw upon the knowledge and experience of their forebears, the Maun-Ge are revered as sages and storytellers. Those who interact with them at length come away feeling somewhat enlightened (+1 wisdom for 2d4 days). The Maun-Ge know the True Names of all men (treat as a Geas Spell), using this knowledge to command humans to play a part in their schemes to increase and perpetuate their bloodline’s influence, status and power. (Author: Sean Wills)

  • Maun-Ge: HD 1; AC 9 [10]; Atk dagger (1d4); Move 12; Save 17; AL L; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Geas.

Source: Monstrosities

Mawler

A mawler’s natural form is that of a small blob of fleshy stuff approximately 2 feet across. Mawlers are rarely ever seen in their natural form, however, as they almost always take the shape of an article of clothing. A mawler can alter its texture, color and shape to match such substances as leather and metal. A single mawler usually takes on the form of a single article of clothing, such as a hat, helmet, scarf, codpiece or belt. A pair of these creatures encountered together can take the shape of a pair of boots or a pair of gloves. A mawler radiates as magic, which often lures victims to it who detect magic on the item the mawler is mimicking. When an unsuspecting person dons the mawler, it attacks with its bite. If a mawler hits, it automatically constricts for 1d4 points of damage in the next round. If a mawler rolls a natural 20 on its bite attack, it severs whatever appendage is within it at the time (a leg or hand, for example).

  • Mawler: HD 4; AC 7 [12]Atk Bite (1d4); Move 6; Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; 
    Special: Constrict, mimic shape, radiate magic, vorpal bite

Source: Mawler from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Mechanisms

Mechanisms are, effectively, magically-constructed robots. They are not merely animated, for they have a mechanical component to their operations, but these mechanical components require magic in order to function.

Bronze Cobra

Bronze cobras are similar to iron cobras, built in ancient days by powerful spell casters as mechanical servants using powerful magic. These jointed snakes are the size of a normal cobra, and follow commands given to them or programmed into them by their creators. Bronze cobras are not as lethal as iron cobras, being made of softer metal and having a five-dose supply of paralysis poison (3d6 turns) rather than a three-dose supply of lethal poison. They are, however, faster than the similar mechanism created from iron.

  • Bronze Cobra Mechanism: HD 2; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 bite (1d2 + poison); Move 12; Save 16; AL N;CL/XP 3/60; Special: Non-lethal paralysis poison.

Clockwork Cavalier

A clockwork cavalier is a metallic humanoid (usually plated with tarnished bronze), elaborately forged to resemble a handsome, mustached gentleman, with a winding mechanism (a key) in its back between the shoulder blades, and armed with a sword extending from its right forearm. Once it has been wound up, the cavalier will wait in place until it can perceive a male humanoid armed with a sword, whom it will challenge to fight a duel to the death. If the opponent declines, the cavalier will accuse him with cowardice, and attack the following round. During combat the Cavalier will mock its opponent with a selection of insults and taunts. Any other combatants striking the Cavalier will also become targets. A Cavalier never flees from a fight.

The cavalier grows slower as it winds down. Each successive round it is in combat it gains a -1 to hit and to its movement rate. Eventually it comes to a complete halt (once movement rate reaches 0, in 12 rounds) and is thereafter totally unable to move or fight (although the insults continue for a further 1d4 rounds). Clockwork cavaliers are immune to Sleep, Charm and Hold, and to all non-magical piercing weapons. Any two-handed sword or axe that hits has a 1 in 6 chance of beheading the Cavalier – which causes it to halt and then explode within the next round (burst radius 20ft, 1d6 damage – a successful saving throw means that a person caught in the blast only takes half damage). (Author: Sean Wills)

  • Clockwork Cavalier: HD 5; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 sword (1d8); Move 12; Save 13; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Slows down, immune to sleep, charm, hold, and non-magical piercing weapons, explodes if beheaded.

Giant Robot

Throughout time, every evil genius yearns deep in his heart to create a giant robot armed with a heat ray and machine guns – even (or perhaps especially) in worlds where the height of technology is represented by hammer-pounded iron, waterwheels, and crossbows. With the aid of magic, madness, and perseverance, however, some such evil geniuses succeed in the task against all odds. And then, there might be beings who live in the deserts of Mars, and beyond the dark void of the night sky. One never knows. Giant robots are 13-15 ft. tall. They tend to be sleek in design and most highly advanced. These heavy combat robots have machine guns for hands (each making four attacks per turn), a chest-mounted mortar (damages all in a 5-ft. radius of the target), and can fire a cone of heat from its head that is 90ft long and 30ft wide at its end, that inflicts hit points equal to the robot’s initial hit points (save for half damage). (Author: Scott Casper)

  • Giant Robot: HD 15; AC 2 [17]; Atk 8 machine gun shots (2d6), mortar (4d6); Move 12; Save 3; AL N; CL/XP 19/4100; Special: Heat ray.

Iron Cobra

Iron cobras are a type of eldritch mechanism, created by the great wizards of yore using formulae from their legendary spellbooks and tomes of knowledge. They are jointed constructions of iron, the size of a normal cobra, that slither and attack as commanded (perhaps eons in the past) by their makers. The iron cobra contains a reservoir with three doses of lethal venom. Larger specimens might have been built, with an addition venom dose per additional hit die.

  • Iron Cobra Mechanism: HD 3; AC 1 [18]; Atk 1 bite (1d4 + poison); Move 9; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Poison.

Source: Monstrosities

Medusa

The terrifying medusa has a female face but hair of writhing snakes; it has no legs, but the body of a serpent. The gaze of a medusa turns anyone looking upon it into stone. In addition to the medusa’s relatively weak melee-weapon attack, the snake-hair makes one attack per round, causing no damage but inflicting a lethal poison with a successful hit (saving throw applies).

  • Medusa: HD 6; AC8 [11]; Atk 1 weapon (1d4); Move 9; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Gaze turns to stone, poison.

Source: Monstrosities

Medusa, Greater

A greater medusa looks like its lesser kin except that it has the lower torso of a giant snake. The greater medusa is a rare form of the normal medusa. They are very solitary creatures and dwell far from civilization, rarely leaving their lairs. In all other respects, they behave as the normal medusa. 

A greater medusa’s gaze turns people to stone and their snakes’ fangs are poisonous. The blood of a greater medusa is highly poisonous even to the touch. A creature contacting the blood must succeed on a saving throw or take 2d6 points of damage. The blood loses its potency one hour after being exposed to air.

  • Medusa, Greater: HD 8; AC 3 [16]Atk Shortbow (1d6) or dagger (1d4) and snakes (1d4 plus poison); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Petrifying gaze, poisonous blood

Source: Medusa, Greater from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Wizards of the Coast.

Melgara

The Melgara (singular and plural) are a humanoid race from an alternate world. They appear to be tall, slender, blue-skinned women, dressed in silvery-grey robes and sandals, with long pale hair, and slitted eyes. They have six digits per extremity, plus an extra thumb on the left hand, and live for 200 to 350 years. All members of the Melgara race are mystical and introspective by nature, given to meditating upon philosophy, cosmology, and emotional awareness. They consider most other races to be psychologically impaired, and will communicate with them as condescending parents or teachers to slow or stunted children. The Melgara arm themselves with staffs and wands of a strange, durable crystal found on their world. The staff deals 2d4 damage. The wand, when used as a striking weapon, deals 1d4 damage in addition to 1d4 rounds of a Slowing effect or a Stunning effect (saving throw negates). The Melgara can also channel mental energy through these crystal weapons (3 times per day), causing any one of the following more powerful effects with a successful Attacks: (1) Paralysis for 1 turn, (2) Sleep for 1 hour, or (3) Charm for 1 full day. Each member of the race has spell ability equal to a cleric of level 2, and some have spell casting ability of up to level 5. They do not, however, have the ability to turn undead. In addition to clerical spell casting, all melgara can cast the magic-user spells sleep, shield, blur, and ESP, although these spells take up a clerical spell “slot”. Once per day, they can increase their own speed, allowing a bonus of 2 to armor class (AC 5[14]). In any group of melgara, one will possess a crystal pendant or silvery rod of unusual design. These items have no combat function, being ceremonial devices on the Melgaran homeworld. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Melgara: HD 3+2; AC 7 [12] or 5[14]; Atk 1 staff (2d4) or wand (1d4 + stun or slow); Save 14; Move 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Spells (1 level 1), mentally augmented attack (hold, sleep, or charm), increase speed.

Source: Monstrosities

Melhukiskata (Sap-Snatcher)

The hunters of the northernmost forests share that terrain with many strange and dangerous beasts. One such predator is the melhukiskata, or “sap snatcher.”

So stealthy is the melhukiskata that it is rare for one to be spotted on the move. Those who have seen them report that its body is three feet long, shaped like a weasel or badger, but can walk like a bear. It is covered with shaggy, grey-brown fur all over, down to the tip of its two-foot long tail. Its mouth is elongated and oddly eel-like, while its feet are wickedly taloned. The most unusual features of the beast, though, are its fingers — for instead of forepaws, the melhukiskata has fingered hands. Odder still, the fingers are long and stiff, and grow out like antlers. The longest of these antler-like fingers yet seen on a melhukiskata were five feet long.

The sap on the hands holds fast anyone touched and also is a weakening contact poison (save vs. poison or lose 1d6 points of strength per round, causing loss of consciousness at 2 strength or lower). Anyone so held can be automatically bitten each round and will be held until the melhukiskata is killed, the adhesive is burned away, or is washed off with vinegar or alcohol. All lost points of strength will be regained in 1d6 hours.

Tracking the melhukiskata is difficult, for when it does travel it often walks backwards, dragging its huge fingers behind it as if to sweep away its trail. Perhaps because of this so many folktales describe the melhukiskata as a clever animal. More likely, such behavior is instinctive. In no other regard does it appear to be smarter than a dog. (Author: Scott Casper)

  • Melhukiskata: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 antler-hand (0), bite (1d6-1); Move 9; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Strength-draining poison, holds fast.

Source: Monstrosities

Memory Child

A memory child is an otherworldly being whose sole purpose is the collecting of memories. A memory child looks exactly like an ordinary child (male or female) about 7 or 8 years old. Regardless of its actual age, a memory child never seems to grow up or grow old. A memory child can absorb an opponent’s thoughts and memories by touch. Draining memories is painful and does 1d6 points of damage to the victim. Alternatively the touch of a memory child can flood the opponent’s mind with every single thought the child has ever collected from those that have come into contact with it. This effect overloads the opponent’s brain, dazing it for 1d6+2 rounds and confusing it for 1 hour (treat as a confusion spell). A successful save negates the stunning effect and reduces the confusion effect to 1 minute. A memory child can use ESP at will.

  • Memory Child: HD 8; AC 5 [14]Atk Mind drain (1d6); Move 12; Save 8; AL N; 
    CL/XP 8/800; Special: Mind flood

Source: Memory Child from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Memory Moss

Memory moss appears as a 1-foot square patch of black moss. It grows in temperate or warm climates and is sometimes encountered in subterranean realms (though not often). Memory moss cannot abide the cold or the arid clime of the desert and is never encountered in such environments.

When a living creature moves within 60 feet of a patch of memory moss, it attacks by attempting to steal that creature’s memories. It can target a single creature each round. A targeted creature must succeed on a saving throw or lose all memories from the last 24 hours. This is particularly nasty to spellcasters, who lose all spells prepared within the last 24 hours. 

Once a memory moss steals a creature’s memories, it sinks back down and does not attack again for one day. Any creature who loses its memories to the memory moss acts as if affected by a confusion spell for the next 1d4 hours. Lost memories can be regained by eating the memory moss that absorbed them. Doing so requires a saving throw, with failure resulting in the creature being nauseated for 1d6 minutes and suffering 2d4 points of damage.

A creature that eats the memory moss temporarily gains the memories currently stored therein (even if they are not the creature’s own memories). Such creatures can even cast spells if the memory moss has stolen these from a spellcasting creature. Creatures eating the memory moss to regain their own lost memories do not lose them after 24 hours. Fire and cold kills a single patch of memory moss.

When first encountered, there is a 25% chance that the memory moss has eaten within the last day and does not attack by stealing memories. In such a case, the moss contains 2d4 spells determined randomly. When a living creature moves within 60 feet of a sated memory moss, it assumes a vaguely humanoid form and casts the stolen spells at its targets.

Source: Memory Moss from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Erica Balsley, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Mephit

Mephits are minor spirits usually related to fire and heat, that can, from time to time, be loosed on the Material Planes by natural means (such as a volcanic eruption) or by supernatural means (such as being summoned by wizards or sent on errands by demons or devils). All of these creatures have the ability to turn into a (mephitic) bad-smelling gaseous form for 1d6 rounds, once per day.

Brimstone Mephit

As with other mephits, brimstone mephits are elemental creatures; they are sly, but not highly intelligent. They spit a reeking cloud of yellowish gas that is 20ft long, by 10ft tall, by 10ft wide. This cloud is choking and caustic, inflicting 2d6 points of damage to anyone caught inside, with a saving throw allowed to reduce the damage to half. The mephit’s own gaseous form is not poisonous, although it smells foul. When in gaseous form, the mephit cannot be attacked other than with spells that would affect gas, but it cannot attack, either. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Brimstone Mephit: HD 3; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 claws (1d3); Move 12 (Fly 20); Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Breathe gas cloud, gaseous form.

Fire Mephit

Fire mephits are minor fire imps, cunning, but not terribly intelligent. They are often servitors of more powerful demonic or infernal beings, and may occasionally be found on the material planes under the circumstances described in the general description of mephits, above. A fire mephit can breathe flame for damage of 1d8+1, half if the victim makes a saving throw. The fire has a range of 20ft. When in gaseous form, the mephit is visible and foul-smelling; it cannot be attacked other than with spells that would affect gas, but it also cannot attack.

  • Fire Mephit: HD 3; AC 5 [14]; Atk 2 fiery touches (1d3+1); Move 12 (Fly 20); Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Breathe gas cloud, gaseous form.

Source: Monstrosities

Lightning Mephit

A lightning mephit is a winged imp about 4 feet tall and weighs about 1 pound. It breathes a 15-foot cone of lightning (1d8 electricity, save for half). Once per day it can call down a bolt of lightning for 2d6 points of damage. A successful save halves the damage. Once per day, a lightning mephit can attempt to summon another lightning mephit with a 25% chance of success. 

  • Lightning Mephit: HD 2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d2 + 1d4 electricity)Move 12/18 (flying); 
    Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Specialbreath weapon, immune to electricity, summon mephit

Source: Lightning Mephit from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Smoke Mephit

A smoke mephit is a winged imp about 4 feet tall and weighs about 1 pound. It breathes a 15-foot cone of hot soot (1d4 points of fire damage, save for half). Living creatures that fail their saves are tormented by burning eyes that impose a –2 to-hit penalty for 3 rounds. Once per day, the mephit can create a downpour of white-hot embers in a 20-foot radius that causes 2d6 points of fire damage to creature in the area. A successful save halves the damage. Once per day, a smoke mephit can attempt to summon another smoke mephit with a 25% chance of success. 

  • Smoke Mephit: HD 2; AC 4 [15]; Atk 2 claws (1d2)Move 12/18 (flying); 
    Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Specialbreath weapon, immune to fire, summon mephit

Source: Smoke Mephit from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Merman

Mermen have the torso of a human and the lower body of a fish. Although the race is called “mermen,” there are female members as well.

  • Merman: HD 1; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 1 (Swim 18); Save 17; AL Any; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Breathe water.

Source: Monstrosities

Midnight Peddler

The midnight peddler appears as a normal human, cloaked in a long gray hooded robe. A long protruding, sharp jaw can be seen under the hood. He wanders city streets and is normally only encountered on fog-covered nights. He is first detected by the audible squeaking of the cart he pushes, the sound growing louder as he draws closer. The midnight peddler moves with a slow gait as he pushes his wooden cart. The contents of his cart vary each time he visits the Material Plane, but at any given time, he has available any item listed in the equipment section with a value of 50 gp or less. The midnight peddler speaks the common tongue.

The touch of the midnight peddler drains 1d4 levels to a living creature.

The peddler provides advice and answers correctly any one question asked of him by any creature who buys something from his cart.

The midnight peddler can plane shift to any inner or outer plane as a move action. His cart (and any non-living matter contained therein) shifts with him. This ability otherwise functions as the spell of the same name.

  • Midnight Peddler: HD 7; AC 3 [16]Atk Touch (death chill); Move 9; Save 9; AL N; 
    CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Death chill, divination, plane shift

Source: Midnight Peddler from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Mihstu

Mihstus are semi-solid creatures from the Elemental Plane of Air. They are found in cool, damp, dark areas such as ruins, dungeons, and underground caves and caverns. The mihstu can shape its body at will and almost always appears on the Material Plane as a cloud of swirling vapor. It can seep through small cracks and openings.

When threatened, a mihstu forms four tentacles from its body. Each tentacle ends in a razor-sharp, barb-like talon. A mihstu can try to wrap a creature in its body as an attack that ignores the victim’s armor bonus to Armor Class. Even while engulfing a victim a mihstu can still use its tentacles to strike at other targets. A mihstu deals 1d2 points of constitution damage to an engulfed opponent each round the hold is maintained.

Ranged attacks (including magic missile) used against a mihstu have a 50% miss chance. Cold-based attacks and effects deal no damage to a mihstu, but stun it. If the cold-based effect allows a saving throw and the mihstu succeeds on its save, it ignores the stun effect. If it fails its save, or if the effect doesn’t allow a save, the mihstu is stunned for 1d4+2 rounds.

  • Mihstu: HD 8; AC -3 [22]Atk 4 tentacles (1d6); Move 9/9 (flying); Save 8; AL C; 
    CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Constitution damage, engulf, +1 or better weapon to hit, immunity to electricity, resistance to missile attacks, magic resistance (15%), susceptible to cold

Source: Mihstu from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Mimi

A mimi resembles a 1-foot-tall elf with small, bee-like wings, silver hair, milk white skin, and icy blue eyes. A mimi dresses in brightly colored clothing, preferring garments of blue, silver, or green. Mimis avoid combat, but blast foes with a cone of cold (once per day) if disturbed. They turn invisible (at will) and flee if threatened.

  • Mimi: HD 2hp; AC 5 [14]Atk 1 dagger (1d4); Move 3/18 (flying); Save 16; AL N; 
    CL/XP 1/15; Special: Spell-like abilities

Source: Mimi from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Mimic

Mimics are formless creatures that imitate surrounding features they have seen. In subterranean settings, they might be disguised as an archway, treasure chest, door, etc. When touched, they glue themselves to the victim with a strong adhesive, while striking with a suddenly-formed tentacle.

  • Mimic: HD 7; AC 6 [13]; Atk 1 smash (2d6); Move 2; Save 9; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Mimicry, glue.

Source: Monstrosities

Minotaur

The minotaur is a man-eating predator, with the head of a bull and the body of a massive human, covered in shaggy hair. Most are not particularly intelligent.

  • Minotaur: HD 6+4; AC 6 [13]; Atk Head butt (2d4), 1 bite (1d3) and 1 weapon (1d8); Move 12; Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Never get lost in labyrinths.

Source: Monstrosities

Mire Beast

Mire brutes, when dormant, appear as large stretches of mud bristling with wooden stakes. Once per day a mire brute can vomit forth a spray of fetid water to a range of 30 feet. The spray contains small biting insects and worms. Treat these vermin as a creeping doom spell. A mire brute can try to impale smaller opponents.  An impaled opponent immediately takes 4d6 points of damage and is stuck on the stakes jutting from the mire brute’s body. The stakes protruding from a mire brute’s body are filthy and diseased. A saving throw is allowed (versus poison). The effects of the disease are decided by the Game Referee.

  • Mire Beast: HD 15; AC 3 [16]Atk 2 fists (3d6) ; Move 9/20 (swimming); Save 3; AL N; 
    CL/XP 15/2900; Special: Disgorge vermin, disease, impale, magic weapon required to hit, immune to fire

Source: Mire Beast from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Mirror Fiend

Mirror fiends inhabit mirrors. They appear as emotionless humans staring out of the reflective surface to the world beyond. If a mirror fiend locks his gaze with someone looking into the mirror, the victim must make a successful saving throw or have his soul sucked into the mirror, while his body remains motionlessly staring at himself in the mirror. While within the mirror, the victim’s actions are controlled by his immobilized self as the mirror fiend attacks the victim’s mirror-self. The victim’s mirror-self suffers -4 to his first attack due to being unfamiliar with the mirror-image environment, but the penalty is reduced by 1 in each subsequent round. Should the immobilized victim’s gaze be moved away from his mirror-self, he will no longer be able to control his movements within the mirror, and the mirror-self will become a motionless target for the mirror fiend. Slaying the mirror fiend will restore the victim’s soul to his body, but shattering the mirror will forever trap the soul within the mirror. Mirror fiends are immune to attacks from normal weapons, and are 50% resistant to magic. Weapons used from outside will likely shatter the mirror, and spells used from the outside will reflect back upon the caster rather than enter the mirror-realm. (Author: Skathros)

  • Mirror Fiend: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 mirror weapon (3d4); Move 12; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Unaffected by normal weapons, 50% magic resistance.

Source: Monstrosities

Mist-Men

Mist men are humanlike forms summoned from some other plane of existence or dimension, often stored in small containers until they are freed to take their full shape when the container is opened.

Once every four rounds, a mist man can breathe out a heavy cloud of choking mist in a 15 foot cone. Anyone caught in the cone must make a saving throw or be blinded by the noxious fumes for 1d4+1 rounds. The mist persists in an area for 1 full turn. (First published in The Black Monastery, adapted by Matt Finch)

  • Mist Men: HD 4; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 fist (2d6); Move (Fly 18); Save 13; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Exhale mist.

Source: Monstrosities

Mite

Mites are thought to be distant relatives of the goblins. Mites live their lives deep under the surface of the earth and are never encountered on the surface world. While sunlight does not harm a mite, it prefers the darkness and dampness of its underground realm. 

Common mites speak their own language of garbled twittering, though some can speak the language of goblins. Pesties generally prefer not to communicate with others (even those of their own race) except through body language and hand signals. It is unknown whether pesties simply cannot or choose not to speak.

Trickery and surprise are the forte of the mite. They avoid direct melee with opponents, preferring to attack from ambush. Often, the first tell-tale signs that mites may be nearby is the plethora of traps, snares, and tripwires encountered. Mites prefer to attack those they feel they can overpower or dispose of quickly. Extremely tough or powerful opponents are ignored and left to pass through unabated or swarmed by a massive number of mites. Though considered unintelligent and stupid by other races, there is a sort of weird cooperation and strategy to mite tactics (that only mites can understand).

A typical mite ambush has the creatures digging narrow tunnels that parallel a dungeon’s corridors. When a foe traverses these corridors, the mites burst from the walls and tunnels and strike quickly with their daggers. Opponents are rarely killed, but any knocked unconscious are relieved of coins, weapons, or any other item of value. If forced into melee, mites seek escape at the first possible opportunity. Mites attack with clubs and a bite in combat, while pesties prefer to utilize hit-and-run tactics to keep opponents off-balance.

Mites make their homes underground in deep, dark dungeons and caverns where they survive by stealing from those unfortunate enough to wander near their lair. A mite lair is often a large central room or cavern from which many small and winding tunnels lead. A mite lair is a filthy place littered with garbage and refuse. Cleanliness and sanitation are virtually unknown in a mite community. Pesties often are found working with or lairing with goblins or (more usually) common mites. The trapmaking skills of the mite complement the pestie’s adeptness at speed and hit-and-run tactics. Mite young are almost never encountered, but a typical lair contains a number of noncombatant young equal to the number of adult mites.t

  • Mite, Common: HD 1; AC 7 [12]Atk Club (1d4) and bite (1d3) ; Move 9; Save 17; AL C; 
    CL/XP 1/15; Special: None
  • Mite, Pestie: HD 1; AC 5 [14]Atk Dagger (1d3) ; Move 15; Save 17; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; 
    Special: Surprise on 1-2 on 1d6

Source: Mite from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Authors Scott Greene and Skeeter Green, based on original material by Ian Livingstone and Mark Barnes.

Mogura-Jin (Cannibal Mole Men)

Cannibal Mole-men (Asian)

Mogura-Jin are a race of subterranean humanoids, descended from a group of villagers who resorted to cannibalism during a particularly fierce winter and were cursed by the Gods. They are squat beings, between 4 and 5 feet tall with pale skin, small beady red eyes, no body hair, and nails overgrown to claws. Mogura-Jin are always hungry and need to consume human flesh every so often to remain alive. Like their animal namesake (the mole) they are proficient tunnelers and their preferred method of attacking their victims is to tunnel under them and emerge from the ground in a swarm attack to surprise them.

Mogura-Jin can see perfectly well even in total darkness; however their over-sensitive eyes are easily blinded by bright lights. (Author: edsan)

  • Mogura-jin: HD 2; AC 7 [12]; Atk 2 claws (1d4); Move 9 (Burrow 9); Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Blinded by bright light.

Source: Monstrosities

Mohrg

Mohrgs are the animated corpses of mass murderers or similar villains who died without atoning for their crimes. They resemble zombies, but are far more dangerous, being somewhat more intelligent, much faster, and much stronger a zombie.

Due to a mohrg’s blinding speed, these monsters will always attack first during a combat round unless squared off against an opponent using some sort of magic that increases the character’s own speed of motion (such as boots of speed). Mohrgs have two possible methods of attacking. First, the mohrg’s tongue extends five feet, and has a paralyzing effect. A saving throw at -2 is permitted to avoid this effect, but victims failing the saving throw are paralyzed for 1d6 turns. The morgh’s second option in combat is to strike opponents with its fists. When the mohrg hits with its hands, the strike not only causes damage, but allows the mohrg to hold on if the victim fails a saving throw. A character who is so held cannot attack, and if the mohrg hits with its tongue in a subsequent round, the tongue will hit automatically (although the victim is still allowed a saving throw to avoid paralysis). Any held character may break free with a successful saving throw during the character’s attack initiative.

Any character killed by mohrg will rise after 1d4 days as a zombie under the morhg’s control. Thus, mohrgs are often found accompanied by 1d6 zombies.

  • Mohrg: HD 10; AC 0 [19]; Atk 1 fist (1d8) or tongue (paralysis); Move 12; Save 5; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: paralyzing tongue, grabs and holds.

Source: Monstrosities

Mold, Brown

Within 5-ft. of a patch of brown mold, the mold drains body heat from living creatures (other than creatures which use magical cold or have cold breath weapons, such as a white dragon). Damage from the heat drain is 2d8 hit points per round with no saving throw. If fire comes in contact with the mold, the mold grows to cover an area twice its original size, boiling forth into new areas and beginning to suck heat from them in the following round. Growths of brown mold can only be killed by the use of magical cold.

  • Brown Mold: HD n/a; AC n/a; Atk none; Move 0; Save n/a; AL N; CL/XP 4/120; Special: Drains heat.

Source: Monstrosities

Mold, Yellow

Yellow mold is a subterranean fungus; it neither moves nor attacks. However, if it is poked or struck, it may (50% chance) release a cloud of poisonous spores, roughly 10 ft. in diameter. Failing a saving throw against the spores means that the character dies a rather horrible death. Touching yellow mold causes 1d6 points of acid damage. These growths can be destroyed with fire, but are effectively immune to weapons.

  • Yellow Mold: HD n/a; AC n/a; Atk 1d6 damage + spore cloud; Move 0; Save n/a; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Poisonous spore cloud, killed by fire.

Source: Monstrosities

Mongrelman

Mongrelmen are hideous creatures seemingly pieced together from parts of other monsters as some sort of vile joke or blight on humanity. Though not inherently evil, mongrelmen are shunned from society because of their appearance. They make their homes far from civilization, and those few encountered in settled areas are usually slaves or servants of the local humanoid races. Mongrelmen that must travel among other races take precautions so as not to reveal their true identities, using cloaks, capes, and the like to hide their forms. Mongrelman society is a collection of close-knit tribes, each with its own leader. Mongrelmen never fight against other mongrelmen, preferring to live peaceably with others of their kind, for all mongrelmen know they are shunned by outsiders and must stick together if their race is to survive. Mongrelmen stand about 6 feet tall. The average lifespan of a mongrelman is 35 years. Mongrelmen speak their own guttural language.

Mongrelmen can imitate sounds made by any creature they have previously encountered, including monsters with special vocal attacks. They cannot, however, mimic the special vocal attack powers or damage dealt by such attacks. A successful listen check made by a listener detects the falsehood. 

Mongrelmen as Characters

Mongrelman characters enjoy a +1 bonus to strength and constitution scores at character creation, but suffer a -3 penalty to their charisma score. These adjustments cannot increase a starting ability score above 18 or lower a starting ability score below 3. Mongrelmen can see in the dark as well as elves and retain their ability to imitate sounds. Mongrelmen can advance in levels as fighters (up to 6th level, or 7th level with a strength score of 13+) or thieves (up to 8th level, or 9th level with a dexterity of 13+).

Randomly Generating a Mongrelman

Mongrelmen are a mixture of many different creatures, and no two mongrelmen ever look alike. The table below can be used to generate the appearance of any given mongrelman.

Roll one time for each of the following areas of a mongrelman: left side of head (includes ear and eye); right side of head (includes ear and eye); torso; right arm; left arm; right leg and left leg.

1d20    Type
1                Gnoll
2                Goblin
3                Hobgoblin
4                Human
5                Kobold
6                Merfolk
7                Locathah
8                Sahuagin
9                Dwarf
10              Elf
11              Gnome
12              Halfling
13              Orc or Ogre
14              Troglodyte
15              Crabman
16              Bugbear
17              Minotaur
18              Flind
19              Lizarfolk
20              Missing body part (Use common sense on this one. Obviously, a mongreman cannot
                    be 
missing part of its torso.)

  • Mongrelman: HD 2; AC 4 [15]Atk Fists (1d4) or club (1d6) ; Move 12; Save 16; AL N; 
    CL/XP 2/30; Special: Sound imitation, surprise on 1-2 on 1d6

Source: Mongrelman from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Monstrous Mouth

A bulbous body twelve feet in diameter, resting atop tiny legs, a monstrous mouth is almost entirely a huge, gaping maw equipped with rows upon rows of sharp, pointed teeth. Atop the strange creature’s body, two short eye-stalks allow it to see its prey, even in total darkness. Each of these eye-stalks can discharge a sleep ray, causing potential prey to fall into a deep slumber; this requires a successful attack roll by the monstrous mouth, but no saving throw is permitted. The slumber is identical to that caused by a magic-user’s sleep spell, but affects creatures with any number of hit dice. Each eye-stalk can use a sleep ray only once per day.

Another, even stranger, ability is the monstrous mouth’s capacity to inhale with such force that a specific target up to 30ft away may be sucked into the creature’s toothy maw. A successful attack roll by the monstrous mouth, followed by a failed saving throw on the part of the victim, will result in the victim being “sucked” into the creature’s mouth. Once the victim is sucked in, the monstrous mouth constricts its interior to pin the victim, suffocating him in 1d4+2 rounds. A successful saving throw is required to escape. Each round spent trapped within a monstrous mouth will inflict damage equal to 1d6, +1hp if the victim is wearing leather armor, +2 if the victim is wearing metal armor other than plate mail, and +3 if the victim is wearing plate mail. (Author: Skathros)

  • Monstrous Mouth: HD 6; AC 3 [16]; Atk Bite (4d6) or special; Move 6; Save 11; AL N; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Slumber rays, Inhale.

Source: Monstrosities

Moon Dog

The moon dog is a large wolfhound from the outer planes (believed to have its origins on the plane of Elysium). Moon dogs often enter the Material Plane when chaos has grown to an immeasurable level in an area. Otherwise, they are found in the employ of deities, solars, planetars, and the most powerful devas. 

Moondogs forepaws are prehensile and resemble human hands. Though moon dogs can move on two legs in a bipedal fashion, most do not do so, preferring the speed and grace they gain by moving on all fours. They have grayish-black fur and golden eyes.

A moon dog can produce one of the following effects when it howls or barks.

Fear: All evil creatures within 80 feet must make a successful saving throw or be affected as by a fear spell.

Dispel Evil: This effect works like the spell, and affects one evil creature within 80 feet.

Dismissal: This effect forces an extraplanar creature to pass a saving throw or be sent back to its home plane.

The following abilities are always active on the moon dog: Detect evil, detect magic, and detect invisibility. They can cast mirror image three times per day and darkness, invisibility, light and obscuring mist once per day. A moon dog can also dispel magic once per day, but doing so forces it back to its plane of origin.

When in shadows, a moon dog can move in such a way as to affect evil creatures within 60 feet as though by a hypnotic pattern. Any lawful creature in the area of the shadow weave will be affected as though by protection from evil. The moon dog cannot use its shadow weave and attack, and the moon dog must concentrate to maintain it.

By licking a person’s wounds, a moon dog may use one of the following abilities: cure disease, cure light wounds or remove disease. Each is usable at will by the moon dog, but only once per day per recipient. 

A moon dog can enter the Ethereal Plane, Astral Plane, or Material Plane. 

  • Moon Dog: HD 9; AC -3 [22]Atk Bite (1d8); Move 18/12 (bipedal); Save 7; AL L; 
    CL/XP 15/2900; Special:  Bay, shadow weave, spells, +1 or better weapon to hit, immunity to fear, lick, plane shift, magic resistance (30%)

Source: Moon Dog from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Mortuary Cyclone

A mortuary cyclone is 5 feet wide at the base, 30 feet wide at the top and about 40 feet tall tornado composed of grave dirt, bone fragments, and body parts all swirling around in its whirlwind form. A mortuary cyclone emanates an aura of desecration within a 50-foot radius centered on its body. Undead within the area gain a +2 bonus on attack rolls, damage rolls, and saves. Once every 1d4 rounds, a mortuary cyclone can blast forth a mass of bone fragments, debris and negative energy in a 30-foot cone. Creatures caught in the cone take 6d6 points of damage. Creatures that save reduce the damage by half. 

Opponents touching or entering the mortuary cyclone (if the cyclone moves into another creature) might be lifted into the air if they are smaller than the mortuary cyclone. A creature that comes into contact with the whirlwind takes 3d6 points of damage. It must also succeed on a save or be picked up bodily and held suspended in the powerful winds, automatically taking 3d6 points of damage each round thereafter. Creatures trapped in the whirlwind cannot move except to go where the mortuary cyclone carries them or to try to escape the whirlwind. Any living creature slain by a mortuary cyclone’s whirlwind attack or energy drain attack becomes an undead creature in 1d4 rounds. Creatures with less than 3 HD return as a ghoul or ghast; 4-7 HD, a wraith; 8-11 HD, a spectre; and 12+ HD return as a ghost.

  • Mortuary Cyclone: HD 17; AC 0 [19]Atk 1 fist (3d6 + level drain) ; Move 16; Save 3; 
    AL C; CL/XP 20/5900; Special:  50% spell resistance, +2 magic weapons required to hit, create spawn, desecrating aura, whirlwind 

Source: Mortuary Cyclone from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Mosquito, Giant

Giant mosquitoes are 3 feet long and slender, with dark black bodies. Silver scales line their thorax, and like other insects, the giant mosquito is segmented. It has six legs of the same dark color as its body and its single pair of wings is translucent. The giant mosquito possesses a long, slender proboscis, the end of which contains its mouth. Females use this to pierce a living creature’s flesh and drink their blood (1d4 hit points per round for 1d6 rounds).

  • Mosquito, Giant: HD 4 hp; AC 6 [13]Atk 1 bite (1 point + blood drain); Move 6/15 (flying); 
    Save 13; AL N; CL/XP B/10; Special: Blood drain

Source: Mosquito, Giant from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Mothdog

Feathery and brightly fluttering, the mothdog is, as its name suggests, a magical crossbreed of moth and dog. The head has compound eyes and feelers; otherwise the creature looks like a greenish-feathered dog. Mothdogs can be tamed, due to their canine intelligence. However, these creatures are insects that lay eggs and undergo a larval stage. A mothdog can emit a piercing high-pitched sound, primarily as a warning signal; if maintained for more than one round, it may cause disorientation and temporary deafness to all within a radius of 5-ft. per mothdog in the group. Some forest folk, particularly nocturnal humanoids, use mothdogs as guard dogs. The combination of canine scent and bat-like echolocation makes the mothdog a superb tracker; some wilderness villages have been known to employ them as tracking beasts. (Author: Scott Wylie Roberts, “Myrystyr”)

  • Mothdog: HD 2+2; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bite (1d6); Move 18; Save 16; AL N; CL/XP 2/30; Special: Moth-scream.

Source: Monstrosities

Mothmere

Little is known about these eerie and malevolent beings. Their appearance in a civilized area is cause for fear and alarm, for they kill humans, sometimes stalking a particular individual, sometimes haunting a specific location such as a crossroads in search of victims. Mothmeres are humanoid in shape, but with great, membranous wings, dark blue-grey skin, and eyes that glow with a faint reddish hue. They have no arms. A mothmere is generally seven feet or so in height, but can be as large as ten feet tall. Mothmeres are most commonly found in the ethereal plane, which may be their natural habitat. They can move into the ethereal plane once per round, becoming immune to any material damage and to all spells other than those with a mental effect. Mothmeres frequently use this ability to enter closed rooms and dismember the inhabitants. A mothmere’s faintly glowing eyes cause fear within 30ft, causing any creature of fewer than 4HD to make a saving throw or flee for 3d12 rounds. Mothmeres can carry 300 lbs. weight while flying, and often pick their victims up to drop from great heights. They also have the ability to control fire at will, as per the pyrotechnics spell. It is unknown why these creatures attack (never eating their prey) or why they seem to haunt areas for periods of time and then suddenly leave. Some claim to have been haunted by these creatures for weeks before being found dead or simply never seen again. Mothmeres typically make temporary lairs in old ruined buildings, hidden caves or mines, or in trees, using them as places to rest during the day and to store trophies from their kills. (Author: M. Ahmed)

  • Mothmere: HD 8; AC 3 [16]; Atk 2 foot-talons (1d6); Move 6 (Fly 24); Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Telepathy, mimicry, pyrotechnics, ethereal travel, +1 or better weapon required to hit, magic resistance 30%.

Source: Monstrosities

Muckdweller

The muckdweller is a small, swamp-dwelling bipedal lizard that lives on a diet of carrion, fresh meat, plants, and insects. It has a long tail that allows it to swim rapidly through the water or maintain its balance when standing upright. Muckdwellers sometimes associate with lizardfolk. Muckdwellers stand about 4 feet tall. They speak their own language of croaks and hisses, and a rare few speak the language of black dragons.

By filling its mouth with muddy water, a muckdweller can fire a stream of muddy water in a 10-foot line. A creature hit must succeed on a saving throw or be blinded for 1d2 rounds. A muckdweller can take a move action to refill its mouth with muddy water so it can use its spray again.

  • Muckdweller: HD 1d6; AC 5 [14]Atk Bite (1d3); Move 6/12 (swimming); Save 18; AL N; 
    CL/XP 1/15; Special: Blinding spray

Source: Muckdweller from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Mudbog

Mudbogs are slow-moving, pudding-like creatures that are brownish in color, resembling nothing more than brackish mud. The average mudbog is roughly 10 feet across and 3 feet deep. Mudbogs dig holes in the swamp and wait for creatures to blunder into their bodies. A mudbog secretes a digestive acid that dissolves organic material (leather armor, wooden clubs, etc.) and deals 1d6 points of damage. Any being that stumbles into a mudbog is considered engulfed and takes 1d6 points of damage from the creature’s acidic nature automatically in the rounds thereafter. 

  • Mudbog: HD 3; AC 5 [14]Atk Engulf; Move 3; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 3/60; 
    Special: Immune to blunt weapons, engulf, acid

Source: Mudbog from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Erica Balsley.

Mudman

A mudman’s natural form is that of a pool of mud about 5 feet in diameter. In this form, they cannot be discerned from normal mud. Mud pools are formed where the run-off from alchemical laboratories mixes with soil. Though not evil, mudmen look with disdain on any who trespass in their mud pools.

When a living creature enters a mud pool, the mudman forms its humanoid shape and attacks until the opponent is slain or leaves the mud pool. A mudman attacks by pummeling a foe with its fists or by hurling globs of mud. Mudmen are bound to the pool where they are formed. 

A mudman attacks by hurling globs of mud at its opponent. These globs deal no damage and have a range of 30 feet. A successful ranged touch attack means the mud glob hits the target and solidifies in the same round. A creature hit by a mud bomb has its movement rate reduced by 3. A creature whose movement is reduced to 0 is stuck on the ground. A stuck creature cannot move without making a successful open doors check. A creature can scrape the mud off, taking one round to scrape it off for every mud bomb that hit them.

A mudman can hurl itself at any creature within 10 feet. If it succeeds on a ranged attack, the mudman engulfs the victim’s head and upper body in mud that instantly solidifies and cuts off the victim’s air. This attack destroys the mudman if its hits; otherwise it reverts to its natural form and must spend one full round reforming. A character that has no air to breathe can hold her breath for 2 rounds per point of Constitution. After this period of time, the character suffocates. The mud can be hit automatically and is destroyed when it takes 6 hit points of damage from a blunt weapon. Each successful attack deals half its damage to the mud and the other half to the engulfed victim. The mud can be pried off by a creature with a successful open doors check.

Mudmen are mindless, and thus immune to mind-influencing effects like charms, suggestions, fear and illusions. Dispel magic acts as a fireball spell against a mudman, dealing 1d6 points of damage per caster level to all mudmen in a 30-foot radius (no save). Transmute mud to rock deals 1d8 points of damage per caster level to all mudmen in the area of effect (save for half).

  • Mudman: HD 2; AC 7 [12]Atk 2 slams (1d4) or mud bomb (see text); Move 6; Save 16; 
    AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Engulf, mud bomb, +1 or better weapon to hit, mindless, mud pool

Source: Mudman from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by David J. Browne, Tom Kirby, and Graeme Morris.

Mummy

Mummies cannot be hit by normal weapons, and even magical weapons cause only half damage. In addition to normal damage, their touch also inflicts a rotting disease which prevents magical healing and causes wounds to heal at one-tenth of the normal rate. A Cure Disease spell can increase healing rate to one-half normal, but a Remove Curse spell is required to completely lift the mummy’s curse.

Mummified kings, pharaohs, priests, or sorcerers might be considerably more powerful than normal mummies.

  • Mummy: HD 5+1; AC 3 [16]; Atk 1 fist (1d12); Move 6; Save 12; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Rot, hit only by magic weapons.

Source: Monstrosities

Mummy of the Deep

A mummy of the deep is an undead creature that lairs in the depths of the sea. It is the result of an evil creature that was buried at sea for its sins in life. The wickedness permeating the former life has managed to cling even into unlife and revive the soul as a mummy of the deep. It appears as a rotting humanoid wrapped in seaweed.

On a slam attack, a victim must pass a saving throw or be embraced by the mummy. The mummy presses its lips against an opponent’s and regurgitates sea water into the opponent’s lungs. Each round thereafter, for the next 10 rounds, the victim must make a saving throw or take 1d4 points of damage that round. Three consecutive successful saves means the character has coughed up enough water to shake the effects of this attack and takes no further damage. An affected creature can take no actions other than to defend itself in any round it takes damage from this ability. At 0 or less hit points, the victim falls unconscious. In the next round, he drowns. Holding one’s breath does not prevent drowning because water is already in the lungs. A remove curse halts the damage if applied before the creature reaches 0 or less hit points.

At the mere sight of a mummy of the deep, the viewer must succeed on a saving throw or be paralyzed with fear for 1d4 rounds.

Once per day, a mummy of the deep can part water or lower water.

  • Mummy of the Deep: HD 6+2; AC -1 [20]Atk Slam (1d6 plus curse of the deep); 
    Move 9/9 (swimming); Save 11; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Curse of the deep, despair, control water, resistance to fire (50%)

Source: Mummy of the Deep from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Murder Crow

Murder crows resemble standard crows except that they stand nearly 4 feet tall with a wingspan of 9 feet. Their tattered feathers are black and carry the stench of death. The eyes of a murder crow are bleak and hollow, showing no signs of emotion or life. Murder crows attack with their jagged beaks and sinister talons. If a murder crow hits an opponent with both claw attacks in the same round, the victim must save or be blinded for 1d4 days or until healed. When killed, a murder crow explodes into a murder of undead ravens.

Undead Raven Swarm: HD 7; AC 6[13]; Atk Swarm (3d6); Move 18 (flying); Save 9; CL/XP 8/800; Special: Disease, distraction, eye-rake

  • Murder Crow: HD 8; AC 4 [15]Atk 2 claws (1d4), bite (1d6); Move 6/30 (flying); Save 8; 
    AL N; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Eye-rake, death throes

Source: Murder Crow from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Lance Hawvermale.

Murder-Born

A murder-born appears as a ghostly image with translucent, yet delicate features. Its unholy eyes rage with absolute and thorough evil that reflects its hatred for the living. Spawned of hatred when both mother and child are murdered, the rapacious soul of the unborn sometimes rises as a foul and corrupt spirit. A murder-born’s incorporeal touch does 1d6 points of damage. Twice per day, a murder-born can unleash a child-like wail that causes creatures to be overcome with despair (save resists) and results in a -1 penalty to saving throws for 24 hours. Magic weapons are required to hit the incorporeal murder-born.

  • Murder-Born: HD 6; AC 4 [15]Atk 1 incorporeal touch (1d6); Move 15 (flying); Save 11; 
    AL C; CL/XP 8/600; Special: Despondent wail, +1 magic weapons to hit

Source: Murder-Born from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Mushroom-man

Standing 4 ft. in height, mushroom-men resemble humanoid mushrooms endowed with both arms and legs. Mushroom-men are usually found in natural caves, caverns, and underground passages.

Mushroom-men are initially created by magic. Once given life through magic they reproduce by way of spores. When a mushroom-man dies (0 hit points or less) it releases 1d6 spores which rapidly (within 1d4 rounds) grow into mushroom-men of 1 HD lower than the parent (1 HD mushroom-men do not produce spores upon death). The spores have 2 hit points (before becoming fully formed mushroom-men). (Author: Skathros)

  • Mushroom-Men: HD 1; AC 5 [14]; Atk Fist (1d6) or weapon; Move 12; Save 17; AL C; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Spores.
  • Mushroom-Men: HD 2; AC 5 [14]; Atk Fist (1d6) or weapon; Move 12; Save 16; AL C; CL/XP 3/60; Special: Spores.
  • Mushroom-Men: HD 13 AC 5 [14]; Atk Fist (1d6) or weapon; Move 12; Save 14; AL C; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Spores.

Source: Monstrosities

N

Naga

“Naga” is the Sanskrit word for dragon or snake. In mythology, the naga are benevolent and very powerful, equivalent to Asian dragons. The nagas portrayed here are more serpentine and less powerful; all have the body of a snake, although the head is not necessarily that of a serpent. All kinds of interesting abilities may be found in “unusual” nagas designed by the Referee, from breathing fire to moving in and out of strange planes of existence.

Guardian Naga

The largest and noblest of the naga, guardian nagas are from 20 to 25 feet in length. They do not necessarily have a humanlike head, but some characteristic (a flowing mane of hair, for instance) will immediately set their appearance apart from normal serpents. They can bite or spit with lethal poison, and if they hit with their coils they automatically cause 1d8 points of constriction damage per round thereafter. Guardian nagas cast clerical spells (2/2/1/1). A sample selection of spells for a guardian naga might include: level 1: Cure light wounds x2; level 2: hold person, silence 15-foot radius; level 3: cure disease; level 4: cure serious wounds.

  • Guardian Naga: HD 11; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d6 + poison), 1 constrict (1d8), 1 spit (poison); Move 18; Save 4; AL L; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Poison, constriction, spells.

Hanu-Naga

Hanu-nagas are a predominantly tropical and subtropical form of naga, less magical than the human-headed variety. Rather than a human-headed giant snake, hanu-nagas have a feral monkey head upon a great serpentine body. These nagas lair in jungles and rainforests, haunting forgotten temples and ancient ruins, where many are worshipped by tribes of wild monkeys and/or apes. The most intelligent of hanu-nagas may have followings of tribesmen or cavemen. The stylized, writhing dance of a hanu-naga allows it to exert a mystic control over apes and monkeys within a radius of 300ft. These controlled creatures will act at the naga’s mental command. It is not necessary for the apes to actually see the naga’s dance to fall under its control; indeed, when a hanu-naga begins its dance, simian creatures within one mile (to a maximum of 20 apes) will immediately begin moving at top speed to the dancing naga’s presence. The naga may dance and attack at the same time. The bite of a hanu-naga is poisonous, and if the naga hits with its constricting attack it will inflict automatic damage of 1d6 per round until killed. (Author: Matt Finch)

  • Hanu-Naga (5 HD): HD 5; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d8 + poison) and 1 constrict (1d6); Move 12 (In treetops 9); Save 12; AL C; CL/XP 6/400; Special: Monkey-summoning dance, poison bite, control simians.
  • Hanu-Naga (6 HD): HD 6; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d8 + poison) and 1 constrict (1d6); Move 12 (In treetops 9); Save 11; CL/XP 7/600; Special: Monkey-summoning dance, poison bite, control simians.

Spirit Naga

Spirit nagas are malicious, evil creatures. Their gaze has the effect of a Charm Person spell, their bite is poison, and they cast both Magic-User spells (4/2/1) and Cleric spells (2/1). A sample spell selection for a spirit naga might be: Magic-User spells level 1: Charm Person x2, Magic Missile, Sleep; level 2: Mirror Image, Web; level 3: Protection from Normal Missiles. Cleric spells level 1: Cure Light Wounds x2; level 2: Silence 15-foot Radius. Such nagas are from 10 to 20 feet in length, and have a human head.

  • Spirit Naga: HD 9; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d3 + poison); Move 12; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Poison, charm gaze, spells.

Water Naga

Water nagas might be of any alignment. They do not ordinarily have human heads, but like the guardian nagas they will have some physical attributes separating them clearly from normal serpents. In the case of water nagas, this might be the color of the scales or the presence of flowing beard-like fins, perhaps. Water nagas are from 10 to 15-ft. long. Water nagas cast magic-user spells (4/2/1). A sample spell selection for a water naga might be: level 1: charm person x2, magic missile, sleep; level 2: mirror image, web; level 3: protection from normal missiles.

  • Water Naga: HD 7; AC 5 [14]; Atk 1 bite (1d4 + poison); Move 12 (Swim 20); Save 9; AL Any; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Poison, spells.

Source: Monstrosities

Nazalor

A nazalor is 7-foot-tall bipedal, stocky, bronze furred hyena with slightly oversized claws and fangs. Its fur is bronze in color with varying shades depending on the creature’s age (young nazalors are brighter in color while an aged nazalor’s coat is dull). Its eyes are usually green or brown. If a nazalor hits an opponent with both claws and its bite in the same round, the opponent must save or be stunned for 1d2 rounds from the ferociousness of the attack.

  • Nazalor: HD 8; AC 4 [15]Atk 2 claws (1d8) and bite (1d8); Move 6; Save 8; 
    AL N; CL/XP 8/600; Special: Stun

Source: Nazalor from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Necrophidius

The necrophidius appears to be a great skeletal snake topped with a human skull. To the dismay of some, it is not undead and therefore cannot be turned or rebuked. The necrophidius is a construct created by a magic-user to serve as a guardian or assassin. A typical necrophidius is 10 feet long.

A necrophidius can entrance opponents by swaying back and forth. Those within 30 feet viewing the dancing snake must succeed on a saving throw (adding a +1 bonus for high wisdom) or be unable to act for 2d4 rounds. Victims are dazed for the duration of the effect and cannot take any action other than defending themselves. 

A living creature bitten by a necrophidius must succeed on a saving throw or be paralyzed for 1d6 minutes.

Rattler

A variation of the necrophidius, the rattler is constructed from the skeletal remains of a giant rattlesnake. During the creation process, the tail rattle is left intact and magicked to create a confusion effect on those that hear it rattle. The rattler uses the same statistics as the standard necrophidius except it does not have the necrophidius’s dance of death special attack. Instead it gains the special attack detailed below.

By shaking its tail rattle, the creature emits a rattling noise to a range of 30 feet. Those within the area that hear this rattle must succeed on a saving throw or be affected as by a confusion spell for 2d4 rounds. 

Construction

A necrophidius’ body consists of a human skull and the skeletal remains of a constrictor snake treated with rare oils and powders worth at least 1,000 gp. Creating the body requires the cooperation of a master sculptor and a 10th level magic-user that can cast charm person (or confusion) and polymorph.

  • Necrophidius: HD 3+3; AC 1 [18]Atk Bite (1d8 plus paralysis); Move 12; Save 14; 
    AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Dance of death, paralysis

Source: Necrophidius from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Simon Tilbrook.

Nemorphic Twin

A Nemorphis is a non-corporeal entity that absorbs stray memories and thoughts; they are sometimes attracted toward the sudden reassemblance of memories that takes place when a person is raised from the dead. Once a Nemorphis forms a psychic link to its victim (saving throw negates), it drains an experience level per day, using absorbed memories and feelings to become a ghostly duplicate of its victim, a so-called Nemorphic Twin. During the days when the victim is being drained of life energy, he frequently becomes lost in wistful reveries of past times, alternating with vivid nightmares.

Once the victim descends to 1st Level, the Twin becomes corporeal, usually resembling a more youthful version of the victim. The Nemorphic Twin will track the person down the next day and attempt to slay him, having the same stats, skills and spells possessed by the weakened twin. Whichever combatant is victorious “inherits” the drained experience levels, in a rush of sensations that has a 1 in 4 chance of sending the victor into a coma lasting 1d6 hours. If defeated, a Nemorphic Twin disappears, leaving no trace of its short existence. If the Nemorphic Twin wins, it will be drawn to the places and people it “remembers.” People interacting with the Nemorphic Twin will find it “wrong” in many ways, for it is still mentally inhuman, whatever its guise. (Author: Sean Wills, aka “Geordie Racer”)

  • Neomorphic Twin: stats depend on circumstances.

Source: Monstrosities

Nereid

Nereids are elemental fey that spend most of their time swimming through the Elemental Plane of Water. Occasionally one finds her way into the Material Plane and takes up temporary residence in lakes, rivers, springs, pools, or inland seas. Many sailors, seafarers, pirates, and other sea-goers have met their ends at the hands of a nereid. Their natural beauty lures men to their doom, for behind the beauty of the honeyed ones lies certain death for any creature that tries to steal a glance or kiss from a nereid.

A nereid can assume the shape of either a male or female humanoid, and almost always assumes a female form unless encountering an all-female party of adventurers. In humanoid form, she can use any of her special attacks and special qualities and can wield weapons and wear armor (though a nereid rarely does so). In her water form, she cannot use any of her special attacks or special qualities, except as noted below. A nereid in water form moves at her swim speed and can flow through cracks, under doors, and through small openings. In this form she retains her damage reduction and AC and gains immunity to poison. A nereid is effectively invisible in water until she assumes humanoid form.

A nereid’s natural form is that of a small pool of water. She can assume a humanoid form at will and usually employs this form when on the Material Plane. Some are arrayed in robes of white or gold, but most appear unclothed. All nereid in humanoid form wear a shawl of white or gold draped over their shoulders.

Nereids shy away from combat and flee at the first sign of conflict if possible. If a nereid encounters only female opponents, she assumes the shape of a handsomely striking male humanoid. A nereid that is attacked can attempt a saving throw. If successful, she takes no damage and assumes her natural watery form and flows away.

A creature of the opposite sex viewing a nereid must make succeed on a saving throw or be instantly smitten and beguiled. This effect is similar to an charm monster spell and lasts as long as the nereid is in view. Females viewing a nereid in male form gain a +2 bonus on their saving throw.

Any creature meeting the lips of a nereid must succeed on a saving throw or take 1d4 points of damage as the nereid floods the creature’s lungs with sea water. Each round thereafter, for the next 10 rounds, the victim must make a saving throw or take 1d4 points of damage. Three consecutive successful saves means the character has coughed up enough water to shake the effects of this attack and takes no further damage. An affected creature can take no actions other than to defend itself in any round it takes damage from this ability. At 0 or less hit points, the victim falls unconscious. In the next round, he drowns. Holding one’s breath does not prevent drowning (water is already in the lungs). A dispel magic, break enchantment, remove curse, heal spell, or successful DC 20 Heal check halts the damage if applied before the creature reaches 0 or less hit points. Nereids are not prone to giving kisses. An opponent that attempts to force a kiss must succeed on a successful grapple check against the nereid.

Once per round, a nereid can spit a stream of watery poison at an opponent within 20 feet. A successful ranged attack that ignores armor is required to hit. A target hit must succeed on a saving throw or be blinded (as the spell) for 2d6 rounds. A character can take a full round to wash away the poison using water or similar liquid.

A nereid can form a volume of water within 30 feet into the shape of a serpent formed of water. A watery serpent is about 6 feet long. It has the same number of hit points as the nereid who created it, and its AC is 4 [15]. Its attacks as the nereid and deals 1d6 points of damage on each successful attack against an opponent.

A nereid need not concentrate to maintain the watery serpent. She can direct it to a new target as a move action if she wishes. At hit points 0, the serpent collapses into normal water. A nereid can only have one such watery serpent in existence at a given time. The watery serpent lasts until destroyed or until the nereid dismisses it or dies.

At will, nereids can lower water and part water.

The nereid’s shawl contains a portion of her life force. If it is ever destroyed, the nereid to which it belongs immediately and forever dissolves into formless water.

  • Nereid: HD 4; AC 3 [16]Atk Poison spittle (ranged attack, poison); Move 12/15 (swimming); Save 13; AL N (chaotic tendencies); CL/XP 8/800; Special: Beguilement, kiss, poison spittle, spells, change shape, magic resistance (40%), transparency, vulnerability

Source: Neried from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Netherspark

A netherspark is a 6-foot-tall humanoid whose form is composed of dark matter. Its head is featureless and sports no eyes, ears, nose, or mouth. It wears no clothes, and bands of silver and white crackle and dance in its form. A netherspark radiates an aura of negative energy that does 1 point of damage to any creature in a 10-foot radius. Undead heal 1 point each round. Once every 1d4 rounds, a netherspark can release a burst of negative energy in a 20-foot radius that does 1d8 points of damage (undead heal 1d8 points). A netherspark can release a ray of energy in a 40-foot line that drains 1 level (save resists).

  • Netherspark: HD 10; AC 3 [16]Atk 2 slams (1d6); Move 12/15 (swimming); Save 5; AL N; 
    CL/XP 13/2300; Special: Negative energy ray, negative energy burst

Source: Netherspark from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Gary Gygax.

Night Hag

Night hags come from beyond the material plane: perhaps from the realms of dream, perhaps from the demonic pits of the underworlds. These creatures prey upon the souls of those who are evil/chaotic: they can cause enchanted sleep once against such individuals (saving throw, affects up to 12th level), or visit the victim’s dreams nightly (no saving throw) to leech away a point of constitution per night until the attribute reaches 0 and the hag can steal away the soul. In combat, night hags can magically weaken an opponent to half normal strength (saving throw) three times per day; additionally, they can use a spell that automatically inflicts 2d8 points of damage against a single opponent. Both of these abilities have a range of 100ft. A hag can also also become ethereal and incorporeal at will, summon a demon ally once per day (with only a 50% chance of success), and cannot be hit by weapons with a magical bonus of +2 or less. They are highly resistant to magic, as well.

  • Night Hag: HD 8; AC 8 [11]; Atk 1 bite (2d6); Move 10; Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 12/2000; Special: Magic resistance (65%), +2 or better magic weapon to hit, magical abilities.

Source: Monstrosities

Nightmare

Nightmares are the steeds of night hags and other demons; black horses with flaming hoofs and mane. Their breath is a cloud of brimstone smoke, which causes any nearby opponent to attack at –2 (saving throw applies). These horrible creatures can become incorporeal and travel between the planes of existence bearing their evil/chaotic riders.

  • Nightmare: HD 7; AC –4 [23]; Atk 1 bite (1d8), 2 hoofs (2d6); Move 18 (Fly 35); Save 9; AL C; CL/XP 10/1400; Special: Breathe smoke, ride between planes/realities.

Source: Monstrosities

Nightshade

A nightshade is a being of pure negative energy formed by the will of the undead. It can assume many shapes by sheer force of will although in its relaxed state it appears as a sludge or ooze-shaped creature composed of withering darkness. At will, a nightshade can cast darkness (15-ft. radius) and detect magic. Three times per day, it can use haste, hold monster and invisibility. Once per day, it can cast cone of cold, finger of death and monster summoning IV. Anyone staring into the swirling negativity of a nightshade’s being must save or flee in fear (as per the spell of the same name). The touch of a nightshade draws the heat from beings, dealing an additional 2d6 points of damage.

  • Nightshade: HD 14; AC 0 [19]; Atk 2 claws (2d8 + 2d6 cold); Move 6; Save 3; AL C; CL/XP 16/3,200; Special: Cold, gaze attack, magical powers.

Source: Splinters of Faith 10

Nilbog

The nilbog is a goblin afflicted with a strange space-time reversal disease known as nilbogism. The disease appears to occur when overly heavy use of magic strains the fabric of the space-time continuum and leads to some very strange localized events. The disease only affects goblins and is not transmitted by them. In appearance, nilbogs are indistinguishable from goblins.

A nilbog constantly emanates an aura of confusion in a 20-foot-radius. A creature in the area must succeed on a saving throw or be affected.

When struck by any attack that would normally damage it, the nilbog actually gains hit points equal to the damage the attack would have otherwise dealt. A nilbog gains any extra hit points above its normal total as temporary hit points, though it can never have more than twice its normal hit points.

The nilbog can only be damaged through the use of curative magic and effects (cure light wounds and healing potions, for instance). Curative magic deals damage equal to the amount it would normally heal.

  • Nilbog: HD 1d6; AC 4 [15]Atk 1 mace (1d6) or javelin (1d4); Move 9; Save 18; AL C; 
    CL/XP 1/15; Special: Spatio-temporal reversal, damage reversal 

Source: Nilbog from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene, based on original material by Roger Musson.

Niln (Vapor Horror)

Nilns are large, amorphous clouds of nearly transparent vapor. Small water droplets dance and play around their form and occasionally drop to the ground. Three large sapphire droplets function as eyes. When manipulating objects or attacking, nilns form wispy and vaporous tendrils that coat everything in water and put out open flames. Once per day, the niln can create a muggy cloud around it that spreads to fill a 20-foot radius. This moving fog fills a victim’s lungs with water as if he is drowning (2d6 damage, save resists).

  • Niln: HD 5; AC 3 [16]Atk 1 slam (1d6); Move 24 (flying); Save 12; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; 
    Special: Drench, drowning fog

Source: Niln from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Nixie

Nixies are weak water fey creatures. One in ten of them has the power to cast a powerful charm person (-2 penalty to saving throw) that causes the victim to walk into the water and join the nixies as their slave for a year. Casting dispel magic against the curse has only a 75% chance of success, and once the victim is actually in the water the chance drops to 25%. Nixies are ordinarily friendly, but they are highly capricious.

  • Nixie: HD 1d4hp; AC 7 [12]; Atk 1 weapon (1d6); Move 6 (Swim 12); Save 18; AL N; CL/XP 1/15; Special: Charm.

Source: Monstrosities

Nuckalavee

A nuckalavee is a large skinless warhorse with a rider of similar make-up, though closer inspection reveals the rider is actually part of the monster itself, growing straight out of the horse’s back. The monster’s internal organs, veins that carry its blackened blood, and corded muscles are all visible. Its body is covered with a thin layer of putrid reddish mucus. The sight of a nuckalavee incites fear in creatures within 30 feet that see it (as per the spell, save resists). Nuckalavee relish combat and attack with a combination of weapon, bite and hoof. Once every four rounds, the nuckalavee can breathe a cloud of noxious gas from its horse head that liquefies organs of those around it (6d6 damage, save for half).

  • Nuckalavee: HD 8; AC 2 [17]Atk 2 hooves (1d6), bite (1d6) and 1 weapon (2d8); Move 18; 
    Save 8; AL C; CL/XP 9/1100; Special: Breath weapon, fearful presence

Source: Nuckalavee from the Tome of Horrors Complete, Copyright 2011, Necromancer Games, Inc., published and distributed by Frog God Games; Author Scott Greene.

Nykoul

Nykoul are undead hill giant shamans, driven to continue plaguing the world by dark powers from beyond this world. In addition to being able to cast spells as a 5th level Cleric, Nykoul possess a disorienting gaze attack (as the spell Confusion) that they may use twice per day. One in three Nykoul commands an army of 1-12 Giant Rats. (Author: Andrew Trent, “the Venomous Pao”)

  • Nykoul: HD 9; AC 4 [15]; Atk 1 Weapon (2d12); Move 9; Save 6; AL C; CL/XP 11/1700; Special: Spells, Undead Immunities, Confusion.

Source: Monstrosities

Nymph

Nymphs inhabit the wild and untrammeled places of the earth, spots of beauty and calm. Anyone seeing a nymph naked must make a saving throw or die (or sometimes be transformed into an animal). Even looking upon a nymph causes permanent blindness (saving throw). Nymphs are not powerful in and of themselves, but harming a nymph almost always brings down vengeance of some sort from the gods.

  • Nymph: HD 3; AC 9 [10]; Atk none; Move 12; Save 14; AL N; CL/XP 5/240; Special: Sight causes blindness or death.

Source: Monstrosities